Justin Guitar Community

Tools of the Trade => Computer and OS => Topic started by: Dan Graves on February 06, 2014, 05:30:22 am

Title: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 06, 2014, 05:30:22 am
I've been wanting to do something with an Arduino but don't know what to do. I watched about 8 YT vids on the introduction to how it works. also saw a guy that set up a aquaculture system in his side yard and it checks the water level, ph, basically automates the whole deal.

I can't think of anything to make though. Where can I go to find out about some of the stuff you built? ... and why do people pick Raspberry Pi for some things and Arduino for others.


In reverse order :

People pick the Pi's for their price, the fact they are a lot more accessible than complete Arduino sets (which takes more die-hard involvement than most can muster), and some of the Pi's specs are better than the other small footprint ARM processor based systems.
For instance, while the Pi has on 256 or 512 mb's of RAM depending on the model, it does put out full HD, which makes it ideal for a small mediacenter.
It also draws less power than some of the other ARM systems out there, and there is a metric xx--xx ton of people thinking of cool things to do with these little things.
There's also the fact that for some reason the Linux community LOVES the Pi's, which makes controlling stuff through scripting a hell of a lot easier, as the cornerstone of any system is it's OS (or lack thereof), and Linux is a damn good starting point for DIY stuff, in my not so humble opinion.
Arduino, however, is a GREAT platform to interface/meld with an RPi, because of the enormous amount of boards and stuff they have.

My sources for many of my projects (Some of them not just for Pi related shizzle ): Lifehacker Pi hub (http://lifehacker.com/tag/raspberry-pi) (most DIY ideas i get from lifehacker, and then modify or merge to suit my needs) Hack-a-day, my go-to site for odd hardware hacks (http://hackaday.com/category/raspberry-pi-2/) Pi Musicbox (http://www.woutervanwijk.nl/pimusicbox/) (<that serves my parents' music needs in their kitchen, found mention of it on the official RPi forums)   Adafruit industries, maker of fun Pi hardware and innovator in many fields (http://learn.adafruit.com/category/raspberry-pi).
I get lots of stuff from ladyada and adafruit, Limor Fried FTW !
Hell, i remember the first time i heard of her was through hackaday, in an article about this : http://www.ladyada.net/make/wavebubble/ , a project which i paid a good friend to do for me (twice), because it was too complicated at the time, too many small solder joints, PCB's to get screened and such... They're great for shutting up chatty teenage girls with cellphones on public transit, so they were well worth the money ;D)

Some further Pi project links for you : http://readwrite.com/2014/01/21/raspberry-pi-great-projects  http://www.instructables.com/id/Raspberry-Pi-Projects/ http://www.howtogeek.com/163541/build-a-35-media-center-with-raspbmc-and-raspberry-pi-redux/

For my Hackbox i'm relying on the resurrection of an old friend : i used to religiously use a (heavily modified and extended) Backtrack Linux based laptop for any Pentesting/Auditing jobs.
Then the Backtrack project sort of died, and was reborn as Kali Linux (http://www.kali.org/), and the first thing they announced was their enthusiasm for the Raspberry Pi.

If you hoped for build specifics/logs of my projects, i'll have to disappoint you there, i keep no logs, and trial and error stuff is lost in translation with me (as has been established, my thinking can be right off the map and into the twilight zone at times, but somehow it works when i muck about with computers and gadgets).
If anything specific seems appealing i can run you through what i remember about the build, but i have no readily available build logs or anything.


Anyway.... I want to build something cool and cheap... has does data share for LAN sound... by that do you mean NAS ( data share LAN ).


Yes and no.
It's a NAS, but i's also more than a NAS, it's more like a central server node/data exchange server with central storage and autonomous clients attached.
And then there's the automation it does, i have sensors and a microphone hooked up to it, so it takes voice commands, and it turns on my light(s) when the photosensor i used detects that natural light has faded beyond a certain point.
It obviously can't do all it's tasks at the same time, hence why i make extended use of order queueing and assigning priority markers so certain tasks always get done first.
I can tell you i used a mix of this : http://scruss.com/blog/2012/12/08/x10-home-automation-with-raspberry-pi-heyu/ , this : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SuD42ZPOto8 and just running an Apache server to handle data exchange.

And i must admit i had lots of help from some of the other hackers at the local hackerspaces, and i'm contemplating borrowing some ideas from these guys : https://revspace.nl/Projects
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 06, 2014, 06:17:42 am
It will take me a bit to sift through those... I can't for the life of me remember how I found adafruit... I did find this this .... http://www.elazary.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=56:hampi&catid=17:misc&Itemid=17

But no links to ada.... .... yeah, that wavebubble is kinda frowned upon  :)... I can think of a few times I wish I had one though.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 06, 2014, 06:25:36 am
Have you seen this? Not a R-Pi but very interesting.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/mossmann/hackrf-an-open-source-sdr-platform/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pPKNpsTDKfI

Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: LievenDV on February 06, 2014, 07:59:32 am
that lifehacker site has some cool examples and heck, I know I can develop for web so if you can run a webserver on it I could imagine a dozen of things.

I think, on this forum, the used of music would be of course the most relevant
- build a synthesizer unit: build a box where you plug in an usb or midi keyboard
- build a guitar/basswhatever multieffect unit
- An internetradio/audio streamer
- build a multitrack recorder
- A music "training" unit; the combo of your own application and pitch recognition could get you into aural training, playing notes and chords and detecting them etc...
(That last one is a bit complicated to program, with these Fourrier stuff etc I know :))


non musical ideas I like are
- home surveillance
- a calendar screen
- moviestreaming,
- attach HD's and create a fileserver with plug n play HD's for streamlined backup and picture exchange processes both physically and over network and web
- gaming
- build a retro style home audio device (built in radio, mp3 player, etc) that fits in your interior  and sounds good
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: bradt on February 06, 2014, 09:11:30 am
I think, on this forum, the used of music would be of course the most relevant

I've had something related to that in mind, though it wouldn't require a pi. I've been thinking about attaching a distance sensor to the headstock of my guitar and basically setting it up as a wah. Basically, you kick the switch and it takes a base reading. from that point on, yanking the guitar up and down acts the same as a wah pedal.

Obviously that is not utilizing things to their fullest, but could be a cool project.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: LievenDV on February 06, 2014, 09:53:05 am
wah operated by headstock movement?

There used to be a user active here, Inventor, who used the mechanic of a Wii controller to create such a thing. I have him on my facebook so if you like; I can get you in touch with him
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: bradt on February 06, 2014, 10:24:49 am
It would really just require a distance sensor and a way to transmit. The distance sensor reads how far the headstock is from the ground and establishes that as a baseline. After that, up is more and down is less.

I dunno exactly how it would work, but could be fun to noodle out.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: LievenDV on February 06, 2014, 10:45:56 am
well, you'd rather not go post there but just as a good read; this was the old thread:
http://justinguitarcommunity.com/index.php?topic=10315.0 (http://justinguitarcommunity.com/index.php?topic=10315.0)
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 06, 2014, 11:10:03 am
I have had a Pi since picking one up at Oggcamp 2012, but I've not had the time to do anything with it yet.

As far as music projects go, I'm pretty familiar with the Linux audio subsystem (ALSA) having previously contributed patches which ended up in the kernel.

The audio hardware on the Pi isn't well regarded, and a lot of people seem to prefer cheap USB audio adapters.

There's also a matter of processing power, which the Pi is relatively limited on. I honestly doubt you would be able to do any significant amount of (for instance) guitar audio processing, such as amp modelling, on the Pi.

There are, however, a lot of potentially interesting projects that can be done on the Pi. I was, for instance, quite interested in the idea of building something using the sooperlooper backend, with some sort of LCD/hard button interface.

As far as audio over LAN is concerned, Jack is your friend there (as it is for most pro-audio type projects), specifically "netjack". I have successfully used this to pipe audio to and from different machines on the same LAN, although I've not tried it using a Pi.

There's also a bunch of audio streaming frameworks that work with Jack. Implementing these on a Pi should be relatively easy.

I've been doing music on Linux for years, as well as a fair bit of messing around with music and streaming apps. Subject to the limited resources on the Pi, most of this stuff should work on the Pi fairly easily.

I also follow Adafruit on G+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+adafruit

There's also a couple of communities dedicated to Pi projects, including the beautifully named "PiCurious": https://plus.google.com/u/0/114556619227408148485

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 06, 2014, 01:28:46 pm
Well, as Keith so eloquently pointed out, unfortunately using the RPi's for audio signal processing wouldn't work very well, too much latency and too precious little processing power, this is where the Beagle and Arduino sets would be a good starting point.

@ Lieven : http://www.woutervanwijk.nl/pimusicbox/
Music streamer  8)
My parents control their kitchen radio from their desktop pc, or my mom's nexus  ;D
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 06, 2014, 02:34:50 pm
Ok, let's say I want to make a media server / NAS route...  Or one or the other.... what specifically would you look at? Which specific components.

Like let's just say NAS with Gigabit port..

Look at items ( hardware, software, extras, etc. )... Ok, I'll start with what I know as specific...

A. Raw hard drives - have an assortment of IDE, SATA and different sizes from notebook to normal
----- 1.
----- 2.

B. Power supply --- not sure here... build,,, buy... which
----- 1.
------2.

C. Ard, Pi, Other ( and other can be store bought NAS if it's better and makes sense on money )

D. Software - no clue
---- 1. learning curve is an issue?
---- 2. costs
---- 3. custom code?

E. Boxes, components... I'm ok with DigiKey, Mouser etc but what about other specific type parts.



Ok, so help me fill in some blanks with specifics so I can look at the project and see if the cost, details, etc, are something I think I can do or want to tackle.


Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 06, 2014, 03:06:12 pm
Ok, let's say I want to make a media server / NAS route...  Or one or the other.... what specifically would you look at? Which specific components.

If you are specifically looking at a Pi, then most of what you need to be a basic NAS is pretty much built into Linux. You just need to know how to configure it all up.

This may help:

http://www.howtogeek.com/139433/how-to-turn-a-raspberry-pi-into-a-low-power-network-storage-device/

There are specific NAS based distros too, which wrap a lot of this geekery up into something that is much easier to install and configure, usually with some sort of web-interface. These are normally designed for installation onto a general PC, rather than a Pi, but....

Quote
Like let's just say NAS with Gigabit port..

I wouldn't start from a Pi, or in fact from any of these smaller systems. They simply wouldn't be powerful enough if you think you need Gigabit networking performance.

I would look at small form-factor PCs, or embedded appliances upwards. Even an old PC or laptop would do this. I know people who have build perfectly good NAS devices from old EeePCs. I believe there are barebones suppliers who can supply a power-efficient motherboard in a chassis designed for hot-pluggable drives.

One of the more popular of the aforementioned distros:

http://www.freenas.org/

They seem to have quite a rich community and lots of information on there about the sort of hardware that's available.

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 06, 2014, 03:46:04 pm
A) You'd want to go with SATA drives over PATA (IDE).
Best bang for buck for the storage part would be a pre-made NAS, as doing that through/with a Pi is NOT effective (i'm going to replace my self built drive rack with a proper NAS along the line), or worth the time, unless you magically have all the needed parts, cables and whatnot (i did cause i'm a packrat), but it'd still be very time consuming.
I agree with Keith on this : the Pi CAN do it, but it's not the right platform for it.
His suggestions for turning an old PC into a NAS are also excellent alternatives for buying some expensive premade NAS unit.

B) Power supply would be included with the NAS, so not an issue, for Pi power see E.

C) Pi could be used for the Media server/center bit, using it as the media player or as the main interface to the NAS, on top of the NAS just doing it's thing on the network as a share.

D1) Software takes a bit of learning, but for a mediacenter/server/player OpenElec and RaspBMC cannot be beat.
Both are VERY userfriendly and most things will work right out of the box, at the worst we'd have to teach you how to use the command line to update stuff or add files/dependencies, although both RaspBMC and OpenElec take care of the updating on their own, without much user interaction.
I'd suggesting looking at running NOOBS (http://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads) (don't  be put off by the name), which lets you install several OS'es on one SD card.
D2) Software cost is none, because GPL/Gnu/FosS/Linux.
D3) Custom code can be needed, but the Raspberry Pi forums are full of very friendly and helpfull folks who are often more than willing to help.

E) Pi's can be bought just about everywhere, even Amazon. Adafruit is an obvious choice for parts as well.
You'd typically want a Pi, a 4-8 GB SD card (class 10!!, and i suggest getting at least 8Gb's), a small enclosure (Adafruint, Cyntec, PiBow, Stackable, PiFace) and either a powered USB hub like the PiHub i showed in the 'random buys' thread that will also power the Pi, or just a small telephone charger (1-2A, 5v) and a self-powered USB hub.
The phone chargers are usually sold by the shops that carry the Pi's, but i want to stress that something like the PiHub is the best solution for clean power and connnectivity.
If you go the WiFi route you need to look into which USB dongles will work with your Pi OS of choice, but that isn't too hard to find out.
Other than that i have local sources, so i can't be of much help there.

Cost is what you make of it, a Pi with PiHub and a simple enclosure shouldn't be more than $60-$70 (many stores will sell complete kits for about tht, which will include the SD card, usually pre-imaged and ready to go), Wifi Dongle will be from $5 up to $20, depending on brand and type, NAS would be the most expensive part really.
Although a NAS isn't always necessary : a simple SAMBA share on your Windows PC could suffice, you download/attain by legal means the media you wish to play via the RPi, add to share, make sure Pi is on the same network, type info for the SAMBA share into the RPi's OS, and Bob's yer uncle.
For example, my dad's music collection was turned into MP3's, put on a SAMBA share on their living room PC, and the RPi in the kitchen can stream all that content.

A NAS would work the same;  setup NAS, connect to your LAN in whatever way you plan to, note down IP, point RPi to it, presto.

Assuming you have a modern TV with HDMI, the Pi hooks up to that, and any sort of luxury speaker sets you may have hooked to the TV will keep working as before.
If you want to control the Mediacenter with whatever remote(s) you may have lying around, you can invest in a Flirc dongle (around $20), and then you have luxury at your fingertips.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 06, 2014, 10:13:33 pm
...the Raspberry Pi forums are full of very friendly and helpfull folks who are often more than willing to help.

I would say that, in general, that's the case with most FOSS/hacker type situations.

I will expand on this for the general audience:

A lot of people get scared off of open source because of a handful of reports that the open source communities are "unfriendly" to noobs. In may expience, if you are respectful, nothing can be father from the truth. In fact most Open Source projects give you a "customer service" which is many, many times better than commercial software.

Why?

Because they will generally try to help you, and won't bull**** you in the process. Ultimately they are volunteers who do this for their own reasons. They are not employees, or servants, or lackies. They are, at least, peers. In a lot of cases the people who run these projects are superior to you (certainly to me).

If you treat them with respect, they will help you. If you wade in like a **** they will tear you a new one. They don't give a crap about being nice because they aren't paid to. In fact, being nice to you is costing them money. Most people in these communities will be nice to you, but don't expect it as a right. Because it isn't.

Case in point, Linus Torvalds, the "father" of Linux!

(In case you have never heard of him, Linus is responsible for creating the core of a product that is many times more successful than anything that Bill Gates, Steve Ballmer, or that Apple genius, Steve Wozniac ever produced. Combined!)

But, he can be a complete b******! If you mess up, he will call you out, in public!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_36yNWw_07g

Open source can be an unfriendly place, but only if you are a ****. In every case I have seen where people have complained about Open Source communities, it has been because the complainer has been a ****. They have acted as if they were a customer, with expectations of being fawned over, and their idiocy overlooked.

That sort of egotistical crap doesn't wash in the Open Source community. You can have an ego, but only after you have earned the right to have one.

Ultimately, open source is for people who want to get things done, and who care about security. It can be a rough ride if you act with any form of entitlement, but if you give the community respect they will reward you.

If you care more about having your flawed ego massaged, than actually achieving or leaning anything, or about getting something for nothing then Open Source is probably not for you.

I will add that Open Source communities have a lot in common with this community: treat the rest of the community with respect, contribute where you can, don't be a dick, and you will be rewarded many times over.


Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 08, 2014, 07:12:31 pm
Ok, lemme ax you something... I'm still weighing costs vs practicality and do I need it type thing.

would it be possible to make a little "pocket computer" that could run a browser that I could use for no other purpose than banking.

IOW, I would keep it offline util needed then it would have my banking and bill paying stuff ready to go with a simple browser... I know I could probably go find a $50 laptop but the battery will be dead, it will he bulky and heavy, certainly can stick it in a coat pocket, etc...

So is it possible to do that?  My first guess is no because ebanking often requires specific browser like IE or it won't allow access. At any rate ... what say you?  Possible or keep dreaming?

My other 'area of interest' I suppose you could say would be something like this for measuring and timing control... remote monitoring... like rainwater collection, pumping, on off of water valves...

Again, I know some of this stuff can simply be bought like irrigation systems and even computer controlled but then I am tied to whatever they offer as opposed to DIY or getting community help to write a piece of code that solves a additional need I may come upon in use.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2wWTadsBDA


I seem to be finding more stuff but still can't seem to get all the ducks in a row as to the big picture and individual parts that might be needed ( soft and hard )

ETA: BTW... I'm not saying I want to do all the stuff he is doing... I would however like to see a walk through of say a water level sensor that turns a valve off. IOW, if I saw that I could go buy the parts the follow the directions and end up with that one little item just like he has.

As an analogy... I don't need to know how to wind a transformer but I would like to see a simple fuzz box explained so I could buy the parts and build mine.... type comparison.

IOW... I don;t know where the Justinguitar of arduino or RP is so I can go ask how do I learn how to sense water and turn a valve on and off... and what parts do I need and how hard is it to write the code or have it written.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: dhalbert on February 09, 2014, 03:10:02 am
would it be possible to make a little "pocket computer" that could run a browser that I could use for no other purpose than banking.

... My first guess is no because ebanking often requires specific browser like IE or it won't allow access. At any rate ... what say you?  Possible or keep dreaming?

I haven't had the problem of "IE only" on such websites for several years. So I don't think this would be a limitation. A Raspberry Pi would be a fine solution if you wanted to use a separate computer. Some other possibilities:
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 09, 2014, 03:24:14 am
that's actually a good point.... if I run a live cd though, I couldn't save my links and login's though could I. I actually had not though of that idea.

I have run a live cd once to try to recover a drive and they seem to run well. The other issue is I don't know how to compile kernels and all that... It would be great to have something like a usb drive that stored my browser settings and was a barebones fast booting os.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: bradt on February 09, 2014, 03:35:58 am
TB, you could probably use a PI for that, but bear in mind that you will need a display of some sort. Raspberry Pi uses both HDMI and RCA video out, so you could do that somehow. You could maybe code for a small LCD display, but I don't know how well that would work with what you are planning.

As for the automatic watering and such, arduino may be something to look into there. Sensors and components are fairly inexpensive and easy to come by, and there's plenty of sample projects on the net. Raspberry Pi would certainly do it, and there's nothing wrong with using it, but unless you actually need an attached video output, it's a bit more than you'd really need.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 09, 2014, 04:14:45 am
TB, you could probably use a PI for that, but bear in mind that you will need a display of some sort.


I was just thinking of that... that was a bad idea... I forgot I would need a display.

I'm trying to think of something interesting and useful.. I watched the arduino videos and he makes an led blink and all that, which I can simply see.... but it's not really something I want to do.  I wish I could just find a simple practical project with a walk through. I must not be looking in the right place.

So where are you seeing these sensors?
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: bradt on February 09, 2014, 05:07:15 am
As far as tutorials, http://learn.adafruit.com/ is a great resource. Element14 also has some great ones.

For sensors, you can look on amazon or ebay if you know what you want
http://www.adafruit.com/category/35 (loads of fun things)
http://yourduino.com/ (Not a huge stock, but decent stuff)
http://www.sainsmart.com/ (Mostly arduino, but a 3.3v sensor is a 3.3v sensor...they make some great arduino clones too)

A lot of the walkthroughs you will find are mostly things that aren't very useful in themselves, but are pretty useful when putting things together. Some of the home automation tutorials on youtube are pretty good. Also Adafruit hosts a live "show and tell" stream every friday and posts the videos on youtube, you can see some cool ideas there.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 09, 2014, 12:18:09 pm
that's actually a good point.... if I run a live cd though, I couldn't save my links and login's though could I. I actually had not though of that idea.

I have run a live cd once to try to recover a drive and they seem to run well. The other issue is I don't know how to compile kernels and all that... It would be great to have something like a usb drive that stored my browser settings and was a barebones fast booting os.

There are lots of USB booting Linux distro which will do just this. As a suggestion, check out puppylinux.org

The days of needing to compile kernels to use Linux are long gone; more than a decade ago. I occasionally compile my own kernels, but that's out of interest rather than necessity: I sometime test bleeding edge kernel patches for new audio drivers, and have contributed code in the past. Outside of this I haven't compiled a kernel in about 10 years.

Obviously that's not helping you directly in your Raspberry Pi quest, but maybe some familiarity with Linux on a normal PC might whet your appetite and give you ideas for the Pi.

Cheers,

Keith

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: dhalbert on February 09, 2014, 02:42:55 pm
I have an Arduino, a Raspberry Pi and also a Beaglebone Black (http://beagleboard.org/Products/BeagleBone+Black). The BB is about $45 but harder to find. The community for the RPi is much larger, but the BB has a more modern CPU, has flash on board, and can run Ubuntu. I haven't done much with any of these.

As for thumb drive Linux, see also http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/create-a-usb-stick-on-windows.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 09, 2014, 05:17:57 pm
Ok, thanks for the links and ideas... I'm definitely going to try to made usb drive for banking and perhaps shopping.

Still thinking on RPi and Arduino.... I did come to conclusion that you could probably make a very nice effects / amp switching system with one. Not that it would be inexpensive but seems like a good match.

I finally saw those sensors... they really do have a lot.  I think I'll check out some of those show and tell vids. That must be what that aqua-culture video was.... he seemed like he was talking to someone specific rather than just making a YT video.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 09, 2014, 06:59:43 pm
Ok, thanks for the links and ideas... I'm definitely going to try to made usb drive for banking and perhaps shopping.

You may want to consider Tails:

https://tails.boum.org/

Tails is a live operating system, that you can start on almost any computer from a DVD, USB stick, or SD card. It aims at preserving your privacy and anonymity, and helps you to:

Although aimed at being able to use the Internet anonymously, as a side benefit you also get pretty good protection against people snooping on you, planting viruses or other malware, etc.

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 09, 2014, 08:09:54 pm
Ok, thanks will check that out... sounds interesting...

I have a question.... On this 'television' ...
http://www.adafruit.com/products/1033

I see it doesn't show ATSC ( digital over the air )... am I missing something here? Seems like they would have wanted that and you could have a portable TV for travel, whatever, by simply adding an antenna.
 
10-4 on the Kernal -- I did not know that... I have tried Linux several times and the last few times it seemed pretty good but every time I start to get this feeling of ...'ok, is everything secure'... In windows I kind of have this understanding of where everything is, I'm not going to delete it by accident, I'm not going to loose it, pretty well assured no one else can see it ( outside of my home/lan )... but in Linux I feel like I have no control or understanding..... although my recent experiences with Windows are becoming more an more that way as well. 
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 09, 2014, 08:46:08 pm
Ok, thanks will check that out... sounds interesting...

I have a question.... On this 'television' ...
http://www.adafruit.com/products/1033

I see it doesn't show ATSC ( digital over the air )... am I missing something here? Seems like they would have wanted that and you could have a portable TV for travel, whatever, by simply adding an antenna.

Personally, I think that is not a television. I think it is a small monitor.

I can see nowhere where it says it has a tuner of any sort, which would be required for a TV. I think the description is plain incorrect.
 
Quote
10-4 on the Kernal -- I did not know that... I have tried Linux several times and the last few times it seemed pretty good but every time I start to get this feeling of ...'ok, is everything secure'... In windows I kind of have this understanding of where everything is, I'm not going to delete it by accident, I'm not going to loose it, pretty well assured no one else can see it ( outside of my home/lan )... but in Linux I feel like I have no control or understanding..... although my recent experiences with Windows are becoming more an more that way as well.

It depends on the distro, but most distros are pretty secure by design. Of course it depends what you mean by "secure".

For instance if we take two common distros: Centos and Ubuntu. Centos is a clone of Redhat commercial linux (RHEL) and is popular because it is compatible with most commercial Enterprise type software designed to work on Linux.

By the way, by "compatible" I mean it uses the same versions of all the software, the same configuration file locations, the same directory layout, etc. Most of this software can be made to work on other Linux variants, but it make take some tweaking and may not be supported. If you just want it to work "out of the box" and want to get full support for it, you need to use the version they specify. In the case of a lot of commercial apps, that is RHEL.

Anyway, I digress...

If you compare how RHEL/Centos and Ubuntu are set up post install, arguably Ubuntu is more "secure":

* Ubuntu is set up so that normal users cannot do anything to the system by default, but can escalate their privileges in order to make important changes, such as install software. Ubuntu also, by default, blocks login access to the root (admin) user.

* Centos just installs with the root user, who has god-like access to the whole system. In order to secure Centos, you need to log in (as root) and create new users accounts, and do some configuration to disable root logins, etc. This isn't particularly difficult if you know what you are doing, but it's an additional step, and you need to know what you are doing!

Most "desktop focussed" Linux distros will create a non-admin user during installation, and will do most of the basic security stuff for you.

The biggest learning curve is knowing where everything is and that can be distro specific, as with Linux the kernel is the heart of it, but most of the functionality is provided by other applications. Take, for example, the desktop environment. With Windows you have one choice: Windows. With Linux you could be using KDE, or Gnome 3, or Enlightened, or XFCE, or variations on these like Mate or Cinnamon. These are all based on a common framework (X11) but there are also some alternative frameworks coming along (Wayland and Mir).

The good news is most apps will work on most systems regardless of the choices you, or the distro maker, makes. Usually the distro make will create a distro specific version of the common apps, which is then available in their "app store".

Linux has had "app stores" for about 15 years (well before Apple) only they are called "repositories" and all the software in them is usually free! If I run Synaptic on my Linux Mint system, it shows 40,924 packages available!

Now not all are full blown apps. Many are small utilities or even just libraries (equivalent to DLLs on Windows), but a good chunk of them are apps. Of course there's a whole new set of application names to know, as the common Windows/Mac apps aren't usually available on Linux. There is often at least one or two roughly equivalent Linux apps though, but you may need to do some research to find out what they are. You're not going to find Pro-Tools in the Linux repositories!

Once you get used to one distro, you can usually change to another without too much hassle, as most of the key apps are the same. You generally find the major differences are in the system utilities, and it is no more difficult than moving between different versions of Windows.

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 09, 2014, 09:41:10 pm
The biggest learning curve is knowing where everything is and that can be distro specific, as with Linux the kernel is the heart of it, but most of the functionality is provided by other applications.

I think that is my biggest hurdle and by secure I mean, do I know where all my stuff is.

I just have this built in 'feel' for Windows .. although lessening with every new OS... I think I never 'gotten' Linux to the point that I fell ok,,,, ok I know I'm 'root' now or ok, I know I need to make myself a user act and understand 'root' is behind the scenes...

As another example... I did something on a Mac once for someone else... thought I deleted a no longer needed thing... forgot what it was now. a year down the road, I'm looking at the PC for some other issue and lo and behold a reference to that item was still 'easily found' for lack of a better term. I foget the details.... the point being... I had/have no clue what's where and why... is it gone, is it moved, do I even have rights to really delete it, is it simply flagged, is the reference I see simply that, a left over reference to something that truly is gone... In windows I can pretty quickly figure that out.... like say a left over shortcut to a deleted program... I just know where to look to see if it really exists as an installed prog..

Maybe I need a Linux for Dummies book

Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 09, 2014, 10:28:41 pm
I think that is my biggest hurdle and by secure I mean, do I know where all my stuff is.

In that respect, you should be OK. Almost everything as a user will be in your home folder. This is always at "/home/<user>" by default (you can change it, but why would you?). So if you created a user "tbav" your files would be at "/home/tbav/".

Of course, you can put them other places if you want, but home is usually the default location.

The file system of Linux (and Unix in general) is quite simple: there is a single tree. This is unlike Windows where there is a separate tree under every drive (C:\, D:\ and so on). Linux doesn't recognise the concepts of physical hardware changing the structure of the filing system. Any drive (of any type) can be made to appear, arbitrarily, at almost any point in the tree.

Equally, any part of the tree can be moved to a new physical drive and will (or can be made to) appear in the same place in the filing system as it originally did.

This takes a little getting used to, but it is ball-achingly elegant.

What does sometimes confuse new users is that there is a, fairly standard file system structure with system directories cryptically called "/etc", "/usr", "/var" and so on. Most of these can be ignored most of the time. As a user your files and personal app configuration settings will be stored in your "/home/tbav" folder.

Quote
I just have this built in 'feel' for Windows .. although lessening with every new OS... I think I never 'gotten' Linux to the point that I fell ok,,,, ok I know I'm 'root' now or ok, I know I need to make myself a user act and understand 'root' is behind the scenes...

The standard Unix/Linux permission system is relatively simple in concept. In most cases as a desktop user you normally have to care about your own user, and about root. You can use "sudo" to get limited/temporary permission escalation. That's automatically built into a lot of distros now, like Ubuntu, Linux Mint, and so on. You basically get a pop up asking for your password before that action is allowed (to make sure that some other user isn't trying to mess up your computer). That's very much how Windows now does it too.

If you are doing Raspberry Pi type stuff, there's more of a chance you need to get "under the hood".

Quote
As another example... I did something on a Mac once for someone else... thought I deleted a no longer needed thing... forgot what it was now. a year down the road, I'm looking at the PC for some other issue and lo and behold a reference to that item was still 'easily found' for lack of a better term. I foget the details.... the point being... I had/have no clue what's where and why... is it gone, is it moved, do I even have rights to really delete it, is it simply flagged, is the reference I see simply that, a left over reference to something that truly is gone... In windows I can pretty quickly figure that out.... like say a left over shortcut to a deleted program... I just know where to look to see if it really exists as an installed prog..

Linux can be brutal with deletion. However, a lot of desktop environments will overlay a "Trashcan" and make that the primary option, similar to Windows and Mac. However, a lot of Desktop Environments will specifically give you the option "Move to Trash" or "Delete". Delete is hard delete. I hope you had a backup because it's now gone!

If you are ultra paranoid, there are apps which will "shred" the file by overwriting the disk space with random patterns that so that even the NSA would find it difficult to recover the data.

Quote
Maybe I need a Linux for Dummies book

Not necessarily a bad idea, if only to get you going.

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 09, 2014, 10:35:32 pm
Maybe I need a Linux for Dummies book

(http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b366/DanielGravesNL/Picture94_zpsd87b5588.jpg)
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 09, 2014, 10:38:04 pm
By the way, the temporary permission escalation is provided by something called "sudo" (super user do). This also works on command line, where you can prefix any command with "sudo" to get escalated privilages (again, subject to entering a password).

The term "sudo" has entered geek culture, as epitomised by this classic xkcd comic (http://xkcd.com/149/):

(http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/sandwich.png)

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 09, 2014, 10:46:21 pm
Code: [Select]
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade -y  that little snippet of code will be your best friend and worst enemy 8)
That and
Code: [Select]
sudo apt-get install (fill in package name here)
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 09, 2014, 10:46:49 pm
Equally, any part of the tree can be moved to a new physical drive and will (or can be made to) appear in the same place in the filing system as it originally did.

This takes a little getting used to, but it is ball-achingly elegant.


Now that I was not aware of.... and yes I do think think I'm starting to feel something ache.

What does sometimes confuse new users is that there is a, fairly standard file system structure with system directories cryptically called "/etc", "/usr", "/var" and so on. Most of these can be ignored most of the time. As a user your files and personal app configuration settings will be stored in your "/home/tbav" folder.

But what if your boot drive is say a small SSD and you have say massive gigs of samples... Normally I would want Prog on C and Library on D:\Samples for instance... How would you handle that?

I hope you had a backup because it's now gone!

That I can deal with... I usually have a backup before I hit delete.

If you are ultra paranoid, there are apps which will "shred" the file by overwriting the disk space with random patterns that so that even the NSA would find it difficult to recover the data.


No, I just like to know what is what... when drives get old I might do an NSA type wipe if I want to re-use it but normally I retire them ( with a screw driver and hammer )
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 09, 2014, 10:49:03 pm
Code: [Select]
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade -y  that little snippet of code will be your best friend and worst enemy 8)
That and
Code: [Select]
supo apt-get install (fill in package name here)

Is that book really ok... or are you just joking... Also what does that code mean?

Looks like first line is saying maybe go look for updates as admin and do the update?

2nd line ??? supo?? I don't know --- somebody go get something and install it.... which might overwrite something I as a lowly user might be sorry I did??



Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 09, 2014, 10:57:42 pm
But what if your boot drive is say a small SSD and you have say massive gigs of samples... Normally I would want Prog on C and Library on D:\Samples for instance... How would you handle that?

Same as in windows, really.
Or any OS for that matter.
Point OS to new/larger drive, tell it to install there or to move items there for storage.
Most of it can be done through GUI, and if not, the command line isn't anywhere near as daunting as it may seem at first.

That book is not a joke, it's an actual desk reference for linux.
I'd not go with the 2nd edition that i have, as it's dated, but as a basic manual it is fine.
[edit] http://www.dummies.com/store/Computers-Internet/Operating-Systems/Linux.html
Find recent editions for those online and see if they seem useful[/edit]

The first code snippet is self explanatory if you look at what Keith told you about the sudo command.
It's a Debian command (which works on just about every debian derivative) that tells the 'Advanced Packaging Tool' package manager (Apt) that you want user Root (sudo) to look for updates (apt-get update) and then upgrade without asking you questions like 'this new install will take an extra 200kb of disk space, do you want to allow this' (apt-get upgrade -y).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Packaging_Tool

The second snippet is a command to install a package, like say, VLC player (and of course i made a xx--xx typo and somehow typed a P insstead of a D , turning sudo into supo :-[ ).
So a anyway, as per the example of installing VLC player
Code: [Select]
sudo apt-get install vlc
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 09, 2014, 11:21:25 pm
Ah... ok... I didn't see p next to d so I figured it wasn't a typo.

So on the D: versus not having drive letters.... I will simply see 'something' like maybe a drive name?

I was sort of reading this as.....

Win
C: - 250G
D: - 1T

Linux
Drive Space - 1.250T

and trying to figure how does that work with \user\tbav\  as I assumed tbav\ must be somewhere and how will I know that \Library\Samples actually ends up on that D: drive
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 09, 2014, 11:26:00 pm

But what if your boot drive is say a small SSD and you have say massive gigs of samples... Normally I would want Prog on C and Library on D:\Samples for instance... How would you handle that?

The point is it's all one big file system.

A lot depends on whether you have separate fixed internal drives (or separate partitions of those drives) or removable media. At the file system level, the principle stands: it's all one big file system, but most Linux distros are set up to deal with them slightly differently.

For "permanent" drive mappings, these are usually configured in a config file. Normally this is created for you at installation time, but you can alter it using various GUI utilities (like partitioning tools) or by using a text editor on the file itself. Normally you wouldn't need to mess with it.

For instance, if you wanted to have another physically installed drive just for music files, you could connect it to the file system at "/home/tbav/data" or "/var/samples" or, in fact, almost anywhere you want.

More normally you could have the whole /home directory (with users files) on a separate drive. The point is, you could start with a single drive with /home sharing space with everything else. Then if you buy a new drive you can move /home to it, and it would still be /home. The file structure is independent of physical drives. If you have any apps that expect data to be at /home/tbav then they won't care that you've moved this data to another drive; it is totally transparent to them as long as the pathname doesn't change.

For removable media, the OS will usually automatically connect this to the file system tree at some commonly defined place, such as /media. So you might have "/media/cdrom" and "/media/floppy" or "/media/KeithsUSB1" for a usb drive. In a desktop environment this is all transparently done and there's usually some nice gui way of accessing things like USB keys.

This works for file shares as well. For instance, I have a file share on a different machine (actually a NAS) which is mounted at "/fileserver/share". on my desktop PC. That was my personal choice and it was totally arbitrary.

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 09, 2014, 11:39:52 pm
Code: [Select]
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade -y  that little snippet of code will be your best friend and worst enemy 8)
Quote

This is, roughly, the command line equivalent to doing a Windows Update on a distro like Ubuntu or Mint.

Breaking it down

sudo : execute this with superuser privileges
apt-get update : this means update the local index of the software repositories. This index includes details of software versions and updates
&& : this, effectively, means "start a new command". It's a way to combine multiple commands on one line
sudo : execute this with superuser privileges
apt-get upgrade : install all updates


Quote
That and
Code: [Select]
supo apt-get install (fill in package name here)

That means "with super user permissions, install package called ....".

There are, by the way, normally GUI equivalents to these. But it's a lot quicker to tell someone "cut and paste this into a terminal" than to instruct them to use a gui to do these actions, so you often see these bandied around.

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 09, 2014, 11:41:48 pm
Ok, I think I see what you are saying now...

So let's say in windows speak I had this

C:\ one part
D:\ divided into 4 parts -- for no special reason but let's say it ended up D E F G

Linux

After first install it might default to user/tbav on what I know to be the C:\

I could then simply move the entire user/any-and-all-users to D: .. not sure how I will know it's the D: or first partition but I assume it's not hard to see that.

So then I could load samples onto say G: and wha ti would see is

user/tbav/samples   someone else might see user/their name/samples

But if I wanted to do a safety backup I would be backing up the G: partition which again I assume is shown to me as such by some means ... like maybe it says Sample Partition or similar.

Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 09, 2014, 11:46:43 pm
This may shed some light on that : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Device_file#Linux_naming_conventions
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 09, 2014, 11:49:03 pm
Quote
update the local index of the software repositories.

Ok so now in that example were are those repositories? Are they out on the Internet, on a DVD, a file I just downloaded or are they part of my Linux install that is simply sitting on the disk somewhere that I have never actually used.

I think that's another thing that always confused me about Linux and my 'secure' issue. I get confused about what exactly do I have and what do I need?

Like if I want to update Reaper for instance. Version 4.51 running now... they show ver. 4.52 on site. Pretty easy, I'm out of date so I download. I know I need to run it... so I do... do you want to update... yes... fine, it's done, do you want to run 4.52 now?

I can't seem to grasp that what, when, where of Linux.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 09, 2014, 11:58:50 pm
This may shed some light on that : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Device_file#Linux_naming_conventions

So if SATA drives it looks like G:partition would be ??? sdb??? I can't quite figure how that partition is identified.

SD=drive

SDB=second drive

But I can't figure how those partitions are handled
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 10, 2014, 12:02:05 am
BTW... I recall seeing some of this stuff now but every time I have messed with Linux I was trying to recover a failed windows drive so it was not exactly a good learning environment. It was more like panic. and usually I stumbled around simply by recognizing the files and knowing where they were in my windows environment.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 10, 2014, 12:07:06 am
Repositories are on the internet, specifically on trusted servers.
As for versions, that's where
Code: [Select]
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade -y comes in, as it figures out if there is a newer version than what you have, and it does the work for you, much like a built in updater for windows software does.
And most distributions will have GUI run package managers like Synaptic, Aptitude etc, that will tell you 'hey, there's updates for (list of software, drivers, firmwares and kernel updates here), do you wish to update, and if so, what shall we update ?'.
Ubuntu, as much as i loathe it, is a prime example of this : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_Updater http://www.zdnet.com/blog/bott/windows-update-versus-ubuntu-update/496

As for drives, it would be
SDA = one drive
SDB = another drive
SDC = another drive
>SDC1 = that ^drive, partition one
>SDC2 = as above, but partition two.

It's always SD(letter) or HD(letter) for a drive, with appended numbers for partitions per drive.

Something to keep in mind, TB;  linux has become more like windows over time.
There's GUI's for everything.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 10, 2014, 12:13:15 am
As for "how do I know which drive is D", well that is done by some sort of raw drive identifier. There's two ways to do this which I will, call the "old way" and the "new way", although on many systems both systems are supported.

In the "old way", drives appear within the /dev pseudo filing system. The filing system is so important and powerful in Linux than most system resources are mapped into it in one way or another. You can literally open a file browser on the /dev folder and see the raw drives.

For most (non SCSI) drives they normally appear as /dev/sd<x> where x = a, b, c, d, etc.

Then each partition also show up separately as a file with the same name and a number.

So, if you had two physical drives with two partitions on the first drive and 3 on the second, they would appear as:

/dev/sda - The complete drive
/dev/sda1 - partition 1
/desv/sda2 - parition 2
/dev/sdb
/dev/sdb1
/dev/sdb2
/dev/sdb3

This system has many advantages, but if you move a drive to another controller then the drives will be renumbered and this will mess things up.

You can actually examine the raw data of any partition, or the whole drive, by reading the appropriate file. You can image any partition, or the whole drive, by copying the appropriate file.

The "new way" is based on the fact that, with modern drives and BIOS/UEFI, partitions have a unique UUID assigned to them when they are created. You can simply refer to the UUID and it doesn't matter which controller the drive is connected to.

But in either case, in order to map the partition to a specific place in the file tree, you "mount" it. This is either done with a manual command, or an automounter (in the case of things like USB drives) or by specifying the desired mapping in a file that is read at boot time.

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: bradt on February 10, 2014, 12:56:40 am
All of this that you guys are posting is a very good argument for getting a Raspberry Pi, or Beaglebone Black. It's a great way to learn linux, and basic physical computing.

In the case of Pi, that's kind of what it was designed for; to be a cheap computer that you really can't brick if you screw up the software setup, and don't really break the bank if you drop it.

Beaglebone black is similar, but doesn't have near the video (or audio) support. However, if controlling physical systems is your thing, it has a much better GPIO setup (and many more of them).
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 10, 2014, 01:19:15 am
Unfortunately this can be more difficult to describe than it actually is in practice, so maybe a picture will help.

Here is an example of a system with two physical drives, sda and sdb. The current view shows sdb which has a number of partitions and mapping to mount points in the file system tree:

(http://i523.photobucket.com/albums/w359/Majik394/partitions.png) (http://s523.photobucket.com/user/Majik394/media/partitions.png.html)

This was using a graphical partition editor, which is normally how most users would access this these days. As Dan said, Linux is becoming a lot more like WIndows in some respects.

So in this case /dev/sdb7 is the user data partition, but it appears in the file system as /home

99.99% of the time you don't need to care that it is /dev/sdb7. You just know it as /home.

Cheers,

Keith

Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 10, 2014, 01:29:53 am
Ok, I see now.... that seems pretty easy to follow.

----------------

RPi and Linux ... now I didn't realize they run Linux. I thought the Arduino had it's own language and that RPi probably also had it's own. Maybe you all had already told me that but I thought they each had proprietary OSs
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 10, 2014, 03:18:57 am
You won't believe this... I went to the Beaglebone site and started looking at some project's. Saw a SDR(software defined radio) and I'm currently studying for my Extra class license so i check that out.

this guy has a pretty sophisticated deal going with a little iPOD like setup designed all based on public domain stuff. So he has this presentation slide show... and I read through it... at the end is call sign, and address. The guy lives within walking distance of me.

All the way around the world through the Internet and land in my own back yard.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 10, 2014, 11:17:29 am
RPi and Linux ... now I didn't realize they run Linux.

Uuuuh, did you read my first post at all or did you just copy all the links ?  :o

As for coincidences, i keep running into people i know on the internet, but without realising it.
Found an old classmate of mine from highschool on the RPi forums.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 10, 2014, 03:34:53 pm
LOL,,, you mean 4 pages ago....

Quote
There's also the fact that for some reason the Linux community LOVES the Pi's,

OK, OK, LOL..... I think I'm starting to catch on.....  I wonder if maybe Legos would be a bit more tuned to my skill level? or perhaps Tinker Toys.

Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 10, 2014, 09:50:21 pm
Oi ! No trashtalking Lego, i've got a Lego Mindstorms kit here !  :P 8)
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 10, 2014, 10:23:50 pm
Does it run Linux?
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 11, 2014, 12:07:14 pm
The RPi that will eventually control it does  ;)
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 11, 2014, 05:09:45 pm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fGYCrYT114o

OK.. what do you think of that array of software?

I have a bunch of drives and power supplies for them. All USB.

That seems like it would get me going with RPi... get me going with Linux adn get me a NAS with all these drives that are just taking up space..

But... would you make any substitutions in software?

I also watched this guy and he seems pretty smart.... I could even follow how he tracked down the 'sdb'  drive and identified it based on the stuff you guys showed me above.

So basically I think building a NAS would be a good idea. I know I could do it with a PC or laptop but I don't want a big PC running and don't have an old laptop ..and... if i ever get one... I can certainly 'do it over' with what I learn on the RPi right?

I think... with some rewinds... I can pretty much follow this guy... might need some help... but not too far out there it seems...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPrKAZ9Y7ZA

So between those two... any special recipe for disaster regarding the software the two of them mention?

Got drives
Got or can get USB hub
Got wires, cables, power, box, etc..
Can get software
Can get RPi or other

What should be on my shopping list / recipe.. brand of Linux, windows access, etc..


Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 11, 2014, 06:05:16 pm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fGYCrYT114o

OK.. what do you think of that array of software?

I have a bunch of drives and power supplies for them. All USB.

That seems like it would get me going with RPi... get me going with Linux adn get me a NAS with all these drives that are just taking up space..

But... would you make any substitutions in software?

Unfortunately I can't get your first link to play for me. I skimmed through the second one though.

However, I would tend to go with the recommendations in the video, if only because (I'm assuming in the case of the first video) there's a step-by-step guide there. I'm not heavily into advocating one Open Source project over others as they all have their strengths and weaknesses.

I often get people asking me which Linux distro is best. Often it's the one you will have most familiarity with, or find easiest to use. Having a walkthrough video to hand supports the "easier to use".

I've stuck with CentOS for servers for years on the basis I knew Redhat and Mandriva very well. I also knew there were things about Ubuntu, Debian, ArchLinux, and others that made them better for what I was doing in some ways, but not enough to make me switch. Because I see this as "tinkering" as there is no overwhelming thing that makes one Linux distro universally "better" than another. It's swings and roundabouts.

The same largely applies to other applications. Ultimately, what works for you is what is best, and your reasons are different from my reasons.

Having a tutorial video seems like a great reason to follow his recommendations to me.

Quote
So basically I think building a NAS would be a good idea. I know I could do it with a PC or laptop but I don't want a big PC running and don't have an old laptop ..and... if i ever get one... I can certainly 'do it over' with what I learn on the RPi right?

With the caveat that it won't be a super-fast NAS. However, that doesn't mean it won't be adequate or useful. It sounds like a good starter project.

And, yes, most of what you learn can be translated to Linux in general, as well as future Pi projects.

Quote
What should be on my shopping list / recipe.. brand of Linux, windows access, etc..

The second link was part of a channel which had a whole range of tutorials:

http://www.youtube.com/user/RaspberryPiBeginners/videos

I would pull out the appropriate ones from this to start. For example:

Prepping the SD Card (Installing the OS) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c6g4kZy2TTc)
Loading Debian "squeeze" desktop (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B6tqw6C6cWk)
Installing software (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3bOn0K8o8-4)
Webmin (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eP412AudA3g)

When it comes to which Linux, he doesn't make it completely clear which one he is using, as he starts his series on Fedora and then seems to switch to Debian.

I would, personally, chose Raspbian as it's one of the more common used on the Pi, and should be compatible with most of the instructional videos, including the ones above. It's basically an optimised version of Debian

http://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 11, 2014, 06:11:52 pm
10-4 will check them out.

Unfortunately that first video was not a tutorial. It was more show and tell. He just has a big plastic box full of wires and drives and RPi and said... the stuff in the comments is what I used.

I honestly didn't think about speed... that's not good... still not a game killer becasue perhaps I could set things up to run over night for backups, copies, etc..

I just assumed it would run at a reasonable speed.


Oh... this was my find... I wouldn't mind doing something like this and have a bunch of lights already that are no longer in use. Might be nice to get something like that going.... it seems pretty easy... but who knows...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xc1daIb1LVc
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 11, 2014, 06:47:11 pm
I just assumed it would run at a reasonable speed.

It probably will. As I said it won't be super fast. A lot depends on what you intend to use it for. I suspect it would easily be good enough for music streaming, and possible for video streaming, depending on the files (long full HD bluray rips might not work reliably).

It probably wouldn't work for recording to with a DAW app. In that case you are best to store the files on a local hard drive and use the NAS for backup or sharing.

At the end of the day, it should work at a reasonable speed and, even if you use it to store your photos and day to day documents, a NAS is an incredibly useful thing to have.

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 11, 2014, 06:54:39 pm
That pretty much outlines my use. No I would never try to record to it.... I have enough problems without looking for them.

But yeah, I just really need a central files storage area and streaming some vids or music would be nice. If I didn't already have several external drives I might go another route bu they are getting in my way. Be nice to have them all in a box hanging off a router.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Wishbone on February 11, 2014, 07:26:28 pm
I set up and installed a 'Drobo' NAS box in November, for our in-house studio bods to store all their post production video and images on so our marketing lads can get to them easy. That's five WD Red 3TB drives, with 8.9TB usable in total after maximum file integrity options were kicked in.

So far, the control dashboard software tells me they've still only used less than 1% of the available storage on it.

I reckon they should give it to me and they can use one of my portable drives ......... and I'll show them how to use storage space  ;D
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 11, 2014, 07:38:42 pm
I reckon they should give it to me and they can use one of my portable drives ......... and I'll show them how to use storage space  ;D

I suspect they won't think your pr0n collection is a good use of their assets.

;)

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Wishbone on February 11, 2014, 08:02:43 pm
(http://images.zaazu.com/img/innocent-innocent-male-smiley-smiley-emoticon-000633-large.gif)
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: bradt on February 11, 2014, 09:52:35 pm
If speed is your issue then you may consider a BeagleBone Black. The processor is 1Ghz vs the 700Mhz on the Pi. They both have the same RAM, but the BBB has the ability to flash the OS directly to the board rather than having to load from SD (comes with OS pre-installed).

Either should work pretty well though.

Oh... this was my find... I wouldn't mind doing something like this and have a bunch of lights already that are no longer in use. Might be nice to get something like that going.... it seems pretty easy... but who knows...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xc1daIb1LVc

Watching this I am wondering why he chose RPi. I would think an arduino with a shift register would be enough to control the relays, and those PIR sensors he is using all work with arduino as well. I guess if he also wanted wifi connectivity that would be a reason, but you can set up arduinos for that too. It looks like he has a wifi dongle on there.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 12, 2014, 12:27:37 am
(long full HD bluray rips might not work reliably).

My RaspBMC box streams full HD rips over the WiFi just fine.
Bit of lag starting up and pausing at times, but viewing is fine.


@ bradt : As i've stated before, i run one of my Pi's in a similar setup for lights and such, reason i used the Pi is ease of scripting for the sensors through linux, so much work has already been done by others that i can simply borrow their code and then tinker with it until it works for me.
And the networking is a must, especially if i want to be able to remotely switch things on/off.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 12, 2014, 12:34:45 am
I was just going to ask now decision is down to Fruit or Dog Food. I want a job naming new computer endevours. People will just send me money and I will think up crazy names for their products or missions.

That sounds good being able to flash the OS on... does it have an SD card too? I haven't looked that closely yet.


Yes, I think that guy is doing something Wifi,,, I'm pretty sure it was him. One of teh vids he had changed things up a bit to power the RPi from the 12v supply as well.

So just to be clear... you are saying that if I wanted to venture down the NAS or the Lighting deal, that either the RPi or DogBone will hold all the software?

I suppose Majik has a good point with that Raspbian distro. I have heard that mentioned in a few videos and perhaps it doesn't do so well on the dogbone.

So I need to look that up....

RPi vs Bone
Speed -- Bone by 25%
Ram -- equal but Bone has flash
Support - Rpi but basic mechanics will be similar cross platform
OS - RPi has custom distro but I -should- be able to learn to install many various ones on either.
Cost -- roughly the same
Cases - Rpi wins from what I have seen but not deal breaker for me
Sensors, add ons -- I'm a little unclear on this. seem they should be mostly cross platform

Anything else I need to be fretting over ( ha! bet you didn't see that one coming... Dan loves that stuff, I toss it in just for him lol )

I think I'm going to buy one soon and see if I can figure it out.


Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 12, 2014, 12:39:19 am
... reason i used the Pi is ease of scripting for the sensors through linux, so much work has already been done by others that i can simply borrow their code and then tinker with it until it works for me.

Now do I need to be concerned about any of that between RPi and DogBone. IOW... even though it is Linux Scripting... does some/any/all of the existing code get tied directly to RPi hardware and either would not run or need adjusting for DogBone..... if so.... that pretty well seals the deal for me.

If the code is pretty much agnostic to the hardware then maybe I go with the faster one that has flash on board.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 12, 2014, 02:03:56 am
LOL... i had to post this... I swear I think the Internet is a collection of insanity.... This cracked me up.. I found this while of all things simple trying to read some comments about a RPi picture frame viewer.

Had nothing to do with Sheep, Legos, xx--xx or Ditches but.......

-----------

Person 1:
its actualy lego not legos, think what is one individual piece called? its lego plural, like sheep and not sheeps, seriously america, speak english or dont speak at all :P

Person2:
    Yes in New Zealand they say we have a lot of SHEEP, but then the trolls at New Zealand television say "across the xx--xx" because they can not say "across the Tasman" (Tasman sea, the water between Australia & New Zealand)
   
Person3:
        I think you'll find they are saying "across the ditch" (not xx--xx). :)

--------------------------

LOL... I don't why that just cracks me up.... probably because it had absolutely nothing to do with anything and it's so completely stupid it actually seems like it makes sense. Actually in all fairness it was a slide show type deal but apparently if you stop on one item and look for comments they are not in context, so apparently someone must have had something going on with 'Lego'.. lol.... wow... comedians don't need writers any longer... just get on the Internet and read messages for material.


Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 12, 2014, 05:09:34 am
Found a nice comparison link... I'm also starting to find a lot more project stuff. Don't know why it was difficult before.


Really tough to choose a clear winner. If you want 1080p it looks like RPi and speed wise there are some backs and forth issues.

I think maybe for the first one I should probably go with RPi

http://www.cnx-software.com/2013/04/25/beaglebone-black-vs-raspberry-pi-features-and-price-comparison/
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 12, 2014, 08:03:06 am
(long full HD bluray rips might not work reliably).

My RaspBMC box streams full HD rips over the WiFi just fine.
Bit of lag starting up and pausing at times, but viewing is fine.

Sounds like it's doing a lot of buffering, but if it's fast enough for that then it should be more than good enough for most tasks.

As far as distros go, there shouldn't be anything tied into hardware other than the drivers. The main practical difference between distros tends to be which libraries, utilities and apps are provided and in which versions, and which bits are installed by default.

This leads to some differences in file system layout which are mostly transparent. It also means some system configuration tasks may be different from one distro to the next.

But, other than that, they are all pretty similar, and most software will work (or can be made to work) on most distros. It's the "can be made to" bit you really don't want to have to deal with until you have more experience, which is why it is generally best to go with a distro that you know will work, or is most likely to, and that you will get the most help with via tutorials and so on.

Cheers,

Keith

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 12, 2014, 03:17:50 pm
Damn Keith, you just made me realise it probably is just buffering due to the available bandwidth on the wireless  :-[
Now i feel like a putz, because i have plenty of routers here i could use to solve what probably is just congestion  :-X
*walks off in shame, while looking for his old routers*
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 12, 2014, 05:36:35 pm
Ok, speaking of router... I have been looking at this thing for a while.....

Now the dogbone has a client and host USB port where Pi has two host I believe.

This Router has a port for attaching a Drive...

Would it be possible to connect the Pi or Bone to the USB port used as a network storage to many more drives.

IOW,, I seem to recall that when you plug a drive into a USB port on a router you get one drive. You can't plug in a hub and access say 5 drives... but I was wondering if the Pi-Bone could look to the router like one drive and would it be faster than the 100 network cable speed they run at.

Does that makes sense?

Oops... here .. http://reviews.cnet.com/routers/asus-rt-ac68u-dual/4505-3319_7-35828165.html

Actually on the specs I don't think my idea would work.. they have some specifics as to what kind of drives... but.. .you can plug a printer in or a drive... I guess that's a stretch ...

http://event.asus.com/2009/networks/disksupport/

Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 12, 2014, 06:18:31 pm
http://rayshobby.net/?page_id=7664

Now that guy has his shiznit together... that's a nice setup
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 12, 2014, 09:00:53 pm
Ok, speaking of router... I have been looking at this thing for a while.....

Now the dogbone has a client and host USB port where Pi has two host I believe.

This Router has a port for attaching a Drive...

Would it be possible to connect the Pi or Bone to the USB port used as a network storage to many more drives.

Errr, What? I'm sure anything's possible, but I'm not sure why you would want to do that?


Quote
IOW,, I seem to recall that when you plug a drive into a USB port on a router you get one drive. You can't plug in a hub and access say 5 drives... but I was wondering if the Pi-Bone could look to the router like one drive and would it be faster than the 100 network cable speed they run at.

Ah, I see.

Quote
Does that makes sense?

I'm not sure it does. In theory there's nothing stopping you plugging in a hub and putting multiple drives in. If there is, then it's more than likely down to a deliberate restriction in the router (most of these routers are actually running Linux, and the Linux USB storage subsytem supports multiple drives by default). You may need a USB hub with external power.

But if it is restricted, then I honestly don't think trying to get the Pi/Bone to act as a glorified USB hub and drive combiner is a great idea. It would actually be very tricky to do, and would require a USB storage client drive which emulated a USB drive out of a client USB port (you would probably need the 'bone for this). I'm not aware of anyone who has written anything like this (and that should tell you something).

Of course, you could write your own. How's your C and Kernel development skills?

I also doubt it would be any faster than using a Pi directly as a NAS.

Realistically a standalone NAS is a far better, easier, and probably more useful, project.

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 13, 2014, 01:27:03 am
I'm not sure it does. In theory there's nothing stopping you plugging in a hub and putting multiple drives in. If there is, then it's more than likely down to a deliberate restriction in the router (most of these routers are actually running Linux, and the Linux USB storage subsytem supports multiple drives by default). You may need a USB hub with external power.

No, I looked up the allows devices.. you can have 6 partitions and some drive restriction size, but I don't it could look at a hub.

Of course, you could write your own. How's your C and Kernel development skills?

Oh me, I don't want to brag but I would say it's right up there with my brain surgery skills. It's that good.

I also doubt it would be any faster than using a Pi directly as a NAS.

Realistically a standalone NAS is a far better, easier, and probably more useful, project.

Yeah, I don't know what I was thinking about... I'll file that idea under 'didn't stick to wall'

I'm thinking I might buy a BBB.. it has an OS onboard, I can also write one on SD card and upload it. that sprinkler system is actually something I can use.... so I can play around with the BBB, maybe make a NAS or whatever, just to learn with it... Then if I want a pi I can get it and I can buy that sprinkler board and plug the BBB to it... the one I have now is an old manual system and it's a nightmare trying to adjust all the heads going back and forth to house.

If, I'm reading it right his code is open and maybe I can learn from it as well.... so it seems like a win/win for me on that one.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: bradt on February 13, 2014, 02:56:50 pm
Most things on BBB are open. Even the hardware is open source. You can actually manufacture an identical board and sell it if you want...you just can't use the name.
One thing I have had issues with is getting wifi working. Most people have no problems, but even following the instructions to the letter I can't get it working properly.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 13, 2014, 05:31:52 pm
That sort of sounds like yours may be broken... I guess you've totally wiped all the code out of it and started over?

I have not read enough into individual projects to really be able to see any trends on anything. I would expect Wifi to work though.

I think last night I decided to buy a RPi and a BBB. I'm going to get that Sprinkler deal... I've been wanting that for a couple years and really didn't want to get locked into Toro or Rainbird and find their software was not what I wanted.

This sounds like just what I have wanted. I wasn't sure if it was open source or not since it looked like a turn-key deal. What it seems though is that he has non-open version with it's own processor and that one is 'his way'... whereas the BBB and Pi versions are open.

Then I've decided to make RPi media server... so I'm a little unclear though... Mr. Dan ....
Quote
It's a NAS, but i's also more than a NAS, it's more like a central server node/data exchange server with central storage and autonomous clients attached.

Are you guys saying I -should- be able to build a NAS(file storage for all my junk basically, runs some sort of batch files and looks at my desktop and sees the new files I have made for the day and backs them up to drive on NAS... perhaps through some naming convention I use)  IOW... let's say on my desktop one day I get an email with a schematic from someone and I print it to pdf on to my desktop. Maybe I prefix it El_flt for Electronics - Filters .... and somewhere on the NAS I have a drive or partition with a folder for Electronics/Schematics/Filters/ it will stick it in there and do that with all my files.... Then I will want perhaps a mirror updated or maybe I will simply run Acronis or whatever... but basically I want to do a very little work in my daily routine and simply by using a naming convention { which maybe could even be stripped off once transfered to NAS } ... let the NAS keep everything sorted and backed up.

AND.... I want a media server.  Which I suppose will be that RaspMSB or whatever it was called... there seems to be XMSB or RaspMSB?   ETA: BMC .. XBMC or RaspBMC

Looking at the links in this.. they sort of make it sound like there is a lot of free content out there but certainly you have to pay for a lot of it right?... or at least that's how it works through my BlueRay player or PC... or maybe I have been looking in the wrong place?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Raspberry-Pi-Ultimate-XBMC-Media-Center-Wi-fi-Jailbroken-TV-Blue-Slices-Case-/140981019767?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item20d31fa477

Also am I even close in that all that file sorting stuff above people might use a prog named BASH? Seems it may be something like writing batch files but better?

I went to the book store yesterday and just quickly thumbed through a bunch of magazines and books. Didn't read all of anything but saw a few things that sounded like what i was wanting and they mentioned some of these things... like that BASH for instance...

So for the above.. is that a 1 RPi ordeal or a 2Pi... if the latter I suppose that must mean I've gone full circle and back to not having a clue.  I was starting to think I was approaching maybe Pi/3 but when I start looking at having to jump into code to get what I want I start to see some culture shock in my future.

ETA: --- BTW --- getting in wayback machine.... I realized I have like 7 monitors that are doing nothing right now. I saw a case for the RPi that is basically a VESA mount. It never occurred to me to just mount the thing on a used monitor... Did we ( ok, ok, you all ) figure that I could set up a 'banking Pi' so to speak? Because I also have a couple old wireless keyboards and to be honest if I could make a little banking PC out of spare parts and a Pi for $50.... I will do that too. I think I have checked and yes, now all will accept say Firefox so the IE thing is not necessary for banking and I only have a couple places that still require it but that's for something else. So I could have a banking PC that basically sits unpowered offline most of the time and as easy to move as a small flat panel monitor. Was three any other reason I don't want to do that?

Trying to perhaps make one big order so I don't get $5 - $10 to death in shipping charges trying to do one project at a time.

Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 14, 2014, 01:45:46 am

Are you guys saying I -should- be able to build a NAS(file storage for all my junk basically, runs some sort of batch files and looks at my desktop and sees the new files I have made for the day and backs them up to drive on NAS... perhaps through some naming convention I use)  IOW... let's say on my desktop one day I get an email with a schematic from someone and I print it to pdf on to my desktop. Maybe I prefix it El_flt for Electronics - Filters .... and somewhere on the NAS I have a drive or partition with a folder for Electronics/Schematics/Filters/ it will stick it in there and do that with all my files.... Then I will want perhaps a mirror updated or maybe I will simply run Acronis or whatever... but basically I want to do a very little work in my daily routine and simply by using a naming convention { which maybe could even be stripped off once transfered to NAS } ... let the NAS keep everything sorted and backed up.

Ermm, sorta...

Bear in mind a random network device, like a NAS, doesn't know what you have on your PC by default. The normal way you use a NAS is to have it appear as a network drive that you can put stuff on. If you want to do backups, you need to run a backup program on your PC that copies stuff from your local hard drive to the NAS. The NAS itself won't do it without some software on your PC.

For files you put on the NAS though, you can potentially do some cool stuff. Yes you could have it look through your files and sort them in the way you want (assuming you can write a script to do it).

For instance, on my NAS I store all my ripped CDs. I have a small script set up which runs once a day and which automatically creates a number of playlists which contain the latest added tracks by day, week, and month.

Quote
Also am I even close in that all that file sorting stuff above people might use a prog named BASH? Seems it may be something like writing batch files but better?

I went to the book store yesterday and just quickly thumbed through a bunch of magazines and books. Didn't read all of anything but saw a few things that sounded like what i was wanting and they mentioned some of these things... like that BASH for instance...

Bash is like command.exe, but a thousand times more powerful. Bash is actually an enhanced version of "sh" which is the standard Unix/Linux command line "shell", often known as the "Bourne shell" (named after the guy who first wrote it). There are other "shells" available including csh, ksh, and zsh which have different syntaxes but which are all extremely powerful.

BASH stands for "Bourne Again SHell" and is a play on words. For most scripting purposes it can be considered identical to the original "sh". Most of the enhancements are related to the interactive interface.

So, to do this you would need to learn how to program in "sh", known more commonly as "shell scripting".

A large part of the power of shell scripting is the ability to pipe outputs of programs to the inputs of others (you can do the same in Windows command line, but not nearly as flexibly), and the huge number of commonly supplied utilities which you can join together to do clever things.

Linux System admins love shell scripting as you can use it to automate most of the common system admin tasks. The best system admins are both very smart, and very lazy. They prefer to drink coffee and play computer games instead of working, but they also love solving problems and won't shirk their responsibilities. Give someone like this a network of Linux servers to look after and they will have it locked down, and operating like a finely oiled machine within a few weeks and will end up playing Halo or Minecraft most of the day. And the main tool they will use is shell scripting.

You don't have to learn much shell scripting to use Linux these days (although a handful of commands can be quite useful), but if you do want to do something like the things you have described, there's a good chance you can do it with a script. You can even build basic interactive GUI apps in shell.

And if you find something you can't do in shell, it's actually a fairly short step from shell scripting to Python or Perl.

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 14, 2014, 02:09:29 am
Ah... ok.... I was thinking to have the Pi do the backups and copies. running from on the Pi. I do realize it would have to be written, and I would probably have to get some help but really all I want is copies basically.

When I mentioned Acronis, I don;t expect the Pi to get involved in that...

But are you saying if I run a NAS + ( or ) RaspBMC that running copy/backup scripts is just not going to work.

Maybe sort of like if I was using Sony Vegas to render a video project and I asked could I also have Excel do some calculations a book keeping chores.... it might work but it's probably not a great idea.

But then again... I would only want the copy/backup stuff running in the middle of the night.... but maybe the media server would be downloading a movie or something???

Are you saying it's technically possible but I'm trying to do to much at once on a limited computer OR ,, yes it would work fine.. but I need to get the script written on my own first and that going to be my true hurdle.

This is the part that's throwing me.....
Quote
If you want to do backups, you need to run a backup program on your PC that copies stuff from your local hard drive to the NAS. The NAS itself won't do it without some software on your PC.

I was kind of envisioning this...

Pi - Running Linux which can do many things.
----- Pi is running a NAS as one of many things.. but NAS has not consumed the entire resources ( but maybe I'm wrong about that ).
---- Pi is available to do other things... like run a little prog that looks at my computer .... oh... and I should say... I could put all the files from my desktop into a 'share'. IOW, it won't need access to my entire pc ... ok so the Pi doing other things... and now it simply runs that copy/sort deal either upon co0mmand or at 3AM or similar.

I can't figure the "needs to be running on my PC" part.....
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 14, 2014, 02:24:48 am
I was kind of envisioning this...

Pi - Running Linux which can do many things.
----- Pi is running a NAS as one of many things.. but NAS has not consumed the entire resources ( but maybe I'm wrong about that ).
---- Pi is available to do other things... like run a little prog that looks at my computer .... oh... and I should say... I could put all the files from my desktop into a 'share'. IOW, it won't need access to my entire pc ... ok so the Pi doing other things... and now it simply runs that copy/sort deal either upon co0mmand or at 3AM or similar.

I can't figure the "needs to be running on my PC" part.....

Yes, that would work too. The main thing is that "by default" the Pi cannot see the files on your computer. You would have to do something to make that happen. Running a backup program (like Acronis) on your PC is one way. There's no obvious reason why a NAS cannot be the target for that backup.

Sharing the PC folder/drive so that the Pi can see it is another. You would need to make sure your PC didn't suspend.

The "run at 3am" thing is called cron (http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/06/15-practical-crontab-examples/)

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 14, 2014, 02:58:06 am
Ok, sounds good. I ordered a Pi today. I was going to get a book but apparently that 8 in 1 for Dummies has a 2014 version coming out in June... So I will hold out for that.

That's true... just because I have the Pi,,, doesn't mean that perhaps Acronic should do things locally and then let the Pi do things local to it... once it's put in place..... probably a lot less work for me too.

I've got rip all my CDs as well....  :( I had a lot of them done but ripped them to wav and didn't get all the proper data so they couldn't be cataloged. I had some guys try to help me use a couple other progs to read what i had and go back and match songs to albums and pull data bu tit really didn't work.

I've forgotten now where they were... it was one of two progs and one had monkey in the name... but i need a CD database program too.... I don't want to screw that up again.

I'm going FLAC this time and make damn sure I get all the support data I'm supposed to have. come to think of it.... I might need a windows and a Linux program?? Yikes... I just thought of that.... I think maybe those progs were cross platform. I need to look them up again.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 14, 2014, 05:46:13 am
Dan... this guy has settings and things to speed things up that might cure your buffering.... maybe you already know it... Takes him to about 3:00 to get going.... but from there he talks about some interesting things..... I suppose anyway... at this point it's all interesting to me.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5V6cZ9p045w
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 14, 2014, 01:44:52 pm
I've got rip all my CDs as well....  :( I had a lot of them done but ripped them to wav and didn't get all the proper data so they couldn't be cataloged. I had some guys try to help me use a couple other progs to read what i had and go back and match songs to albums and pull data bu tit really didn't work.

I've forgotten now where they were... it was one of two progs and one had monkey in the name... but i need a CD database program too.... I don't want to screw that up again.

WAV is, in general, a poor format to store a music collection in. There is some tagging support, but it's pretty poor and a lot of apps don't use it.

Quote
I'm going FLAC this time and make damn sure I get all the support data I'm supposed to have. come to think of it.... I might need a windows and a Linux program?? Yikes... I just thought of that.... I think maybe those progs were cross platform. I need to look them up again.

FLAC is a great choice.

As an aside, it amazes me how many people think that WAV is somehow audibly better than FLAC. I've heard people claim it must sound better because it's the same format as on the CD. There are two false assumptions in that claim.

It sounds like you used MediaMonkey, which is a well regarded app for ripping, you just chose the wrong format. Most apps will do a reasonable job of auto tagging music files and some even fetch and embed album art.

For linux there's a load of choice for rippers. I like Kaudiocreator because it is simple and configurable. Also k3b which is one of the best general CD burner/copier/rippers going. Bother of these are pure rippers: neither is a "music manager". In other words neither will create a local database. However, if you get the rips right (with the tagged information) you can point any decent music manager at it and it will build a local database from the tags.

It's worth saying that there is no standard for music management databases: every one has it's own format/schema. Music management apps also tend to apply any edits they may only to their local database version, not back to the tags on the original file. Which means if you make changes in one app they probably won't show up in another app.

In my view it is important to keep the tags on the music files as the "master" information source, as this gives you the most flexibility and long-term data preservation. I think MediaMonkey has good tag management capabilities.

A good tag management app on Linux is EasyTag

There's a number of good desktop music management/player apps on Linux including Banshee, Amarok and Rhythmbox. There's also a whole bunch of command line and streaming based music players.

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 14, 2014, 02:19:24 pm

WAV is, in general, a poor format to store a music collection in. There is some tagging support, but it's pretty poor and a lot of apps don't use it.

Go ahead,,,, rub it in.. I deserve it...  :'(    ---- Yeah,,,, I learned that one the hard way... Oh well,,, it was only 135 gigs.......
FLAC is a great choice.

As an aside, it amazes me how many people think that WAV is somehow audibly better than FLAC. I've heard people claim it must sound better because it's the same format as on the CD. There are two false assumptions in that claim.

I honestly can't remember why I used wav... I think it had something to do with having them in DAW format or something..... at any rate.... another project I should have run through on paper a few more times....
It sounds like you used MediaMonkey, which is a well regarded app for ripping, you just chose the wrong format. Most apps will do a reasonable job of auto tagging music files and some even fetch and embed album art.

For linux there's a load of choice for rippers. I like Kaudiocreator because it is simple and configurable. Also k3b which is one of the best general CD burner/copier/rippers going. Bother of these are pure rippers: neither is a "music manager". In other words neither will create a local database. However, if you get the rips right (with the tagged information) you can point any decent music manager at it and it will build a local database from the tags.


I -think- at the time... I simply had no idea about the manager aspects nor tags and I'm still not clear on the tag part. So yeah it turned into a real .... welll... you know the term...

It's worth saying that there is no standard for music management databases: every one has it's own format/schema. Music management apps also tend to apply any edits they may only to their local database version, not back to the tags on the original file. Which means if you make changes in one app they probably won't show up in another app.

In my view it is important to keep the tags on the music files as the "master" information source, as this gives you the most flexibility and long-term data preservation. I think MediaMonkey has good tag management capabilities.

A good tag management app on Linux is EasyTag

There's a number of good desktop music management/player apps on Linux including Banshee, Amarok and Rhythmbox. There's also a whole bunch of command line and streaming based music players.

Cheers,

Keith

I think that's my problem right now... for instance on windows everyone says use EAC which is what I used before because it has great error correction. BUT... I have no idea what tags I need or how I tell if I have them. I know there is ID3 for mp3 but I don;t know if I see that with a FLAC rip or what... Yes it was M-Monkey...

My files just say . Take Me to the River.wav.... But if someone else did it, it might say...

01 Take Me to The River - then a string Title, artist, album, ext...

I mean I can see it looks different but I still don't know if I have all the data I need. The last thing I am worried about is storage space so I want all the tags or what ever I can get.

I see what you mean about managers now and having the "master" but I still don;t know if masters are complete masters. Obviously, I never knew what I didn't know..... Now, I know I don't know what I'm doing. Once I cure that, I can re-do it all. But I still need to figure this 'tag' deal out.

I would rather do this in Windows because I can't get a Linux box running just yet... although I have a near complete PC over here, I probably should get running, It's a lot of money sitting in the floor doing nothing..... As a P4 that would probably be ideal for an all round Linux box.

So have you got something maybe you can post a screen shot of just what the heck 'tags' are so I can see them all and which ones do what? Is there a list somewhere?
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Tim Mason on February 14, 2014, 02:51:32 pm
Tags are just labels that you attach to data. You can define them for yourself, and attach multiple tags to the same data. So you could tag a piece of music by genre, key, instruments, your age when you first heard it, the name of the lover with whom you associate it and so on. Vertiginous terror of freedom.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 14, 2014, 03:10:54 pm

WAV is, in general, a poor format to store a music collection in. There is some tagging support, but it's pretty poor and a lot of apps don't use it.

Go ahead,,,, rub it in.. I deserve it...  :'(    ---- Yeah,,,, I learned that one the hard way... Oh well,,, it was only 135 gigs.......

Believe me we've all done it. I have previously ripped my collection in Ogg, 256k MP3, and now FLAC, as I have learned what works best. Since ripping to FLAC, I am comfortable that I should never need to re-rip.

Quote
I honestly can't remember why I used wav... I think it had something to do with having them in DAW format or something..... at any rate.... another project I should have run through on paper a few more times....

WAV is great for compatibility: FLAC has broad vendor support, but not everything supports it. But you can easily convert from FLAC to WAV (and back) without any generational loss. You can also convert down to MP3, Ogg, or AAC for use on media players.

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I -think- at the time... I simply had no idea about the manager aspects nor tags and I'm still not clear on the tag part.

Tags (aka "metadata") are data which is embedded within the FLAC or MP3 itself, alongside the digital music data. If you are familiar with photography it's similar to EXIF data.

It's not the same as the filename, although there is some value to having a descriptive filename as well. There are tools which will copy information between the filename and the tags, or even create a new directory/filename structure for you to make it easy to find the files using a file browser.

But that's a nice to have. You can call your songs 1.flac, 2.flac, 3.flac if you really want (I know people who do this), as long as the tags are correct.

And, yes, ID3 is one of the main standards for this, and there's some variation: ID3v1 was pretty crude and limited. ID3v2 is much better and supports embedded album art and other capabilities. There's also variations within this (v2.3, v2.4, etc.). The biggest issue is music player support: some music players don't understand some of the newer variations.

But ID3 really applies to MP3. FLAC uses it's own tagging format called "Vorbis Comments", which is pretty standardised.

This is all technical detail though, and you generally don't need to worry about it. Just be aware that most music file formats have an internal data store which holds details about the track. Your main aim is to make sure this is populated with useful data, and then everything else tends to work itself out.

Quote
I think that's my problem right now... for instance on windows everyone says use EAC which is what I used before because it has great error correction. BUT... I have no idea what tags I need or how I tell if I have them. I know there is ID3 for mp3 but I don;t know if I see that with a FLAC rip or what... Yes it was M-Monkey...

My files just say . Take Me to the River.wav.... But if someone else did it, it might say...

01 Take Me to The River - then a string Title, artist, album, ext...

I mean I can see it looks different but I still don't know if I have all the data I need. The last thing I am worried about is storage space so I want all the tags or what ever I can get.

EAC is a good, well regarded app. Most rippers will do the work for you with tags, or at least as much as they can.

CDs generally contain no "metadata": there is nowhere on the CD which contains electronic information about the artist or song information. Most rippers will try to match any CD they rip with Internet databases in order to fill this data in for you and put it into the tags. This is normally pretty good, although it can make some mistakes so it's best to review each CD as you rip it and correct any mistakes, or use a tag editor to tidy it up afterwards.

Tag editors normally have bulk processing tools to allow you, for instance, to set the artist name on a select group of songs to be the same. A typical problem is minor data mismatches so you might, for instance, end up with this sort of thing:

(http://i523.photobucket.com/albums/w359/Majik394/Screenshot_2014-02-14-14-47-17.png) (http://s523.photobucket.com/user/Majik394/media/Screenshot_2014-02-14-14-47-17.png.html)

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I see what you mean about managers now and having the "master" but I still don;t know if masters are complete masters.

I'm not sure what you mean by this, but the aim should be to have the data in the tags as complete and accurate as possible. If you need to edit, edit the tag instead of some database that is derived from it.

By the way, many music manager programs (like iTunes) will do ripping, but they won't automatically tag the files as they are more concerned with maintaining their own database. If you only ever plan to use iTunes, that's fine, but if you want to move your music somewhere else or use a different system, then it's a problem as most other systems will not read the iTunes database. Tags in the files themselves will give you the most flexibility, and using Media Monkey or EAC to rip is the right way to go.

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So have you got something maybe you can post a screen shot of just what the heck 'tags' are so I can see them all and which ones do what? Is there a list somewhere?

It's data, so there's a difficulty in that a graphical representation is just that, a view on that data. The screenshot I posted above is a music player's view of the artist tags, for instance.

However, this might help: it's a screen shot from Easytag:

(http://i523.photobucket.com/albums/w359/Majik394/easytag1.png) (http://s523.photobucket.com/user/Majik394/media/easytag1.png.html)

This shows the folders on the hard drive (actually these are on my NAS) on the left with one folder selected, the middle lists the files in the selected folder. You can see there is a filename, and a separate title, artist, and so on. In my case these align, but there's no reason why they have to. The filename could easily be "wibble1.flac", "wibble2.flac" as I said before.

The pane on the right shows the tags for the selected file, as well as the filename at the top. I can edit either of these independently. The filename is, obviously, what you see on Windows explorer when you are browsing your folders. The other tags are internal to the file, and aren't normally visible unless you use an app that understands tags.

By the way, in case anyone wonders, this is a music collection on my NAS that is shared by my whole family, including my two daughters. Hence the Britney and B*Witched.

In fact, now I think about it, B*witched is a great example of how tags are independent of the filename, as "*" is a character you cannot use in a filename. So here's a screenshot of that to compare:

(http://i523.photobucket.com/albums/w359/Majik394/easytag2.png) (http://s523.photobucket.com/user/Majik394/media/easytag2.png.html)

I hope this helps.

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 14, 2014, 03:41:14 pm
Well thanks for the link TB, but as Keith made me realise, my issue was network congestion;  too many systems running wirelessly over one cheap POS router.
I put my Winblows system on a 5Ghz range router my boss provided me with, and the Pi's on a second one and set that to gateway mode, then sort of 'bridged' the routers so all devices can communicate.
Now there's no buffering, just a few ms of actual input lag (not surprising considering the amount of commands the Pi in question has to handle).
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 14, 2014, 06:08:31 pm
Ok,,,, yes, I get EXIF but can use an EXIF viewer to see things I might need say for a specific picture viewing / serving app.

My problem was... what data do I need for the player/server app to do it's thing... again, I think i just hosed that entire ordeal when I went with wav..

Basically I need to be sure that Vorbis window pane has it's needed data.

Song
Artist
Album

...and for whatever reason my songs lost their order. They simply got sorted alphabetically rather than mastering order. So just so I am clear... what exact piece of data keeps the songs sorted properly.

The universe screeches on it's rails when Jusus Just Left Chicago doesn't follow Waitin' for the Bus.

It looks like to me that the file name handles this yet you say the file name doesn't matter.... which I kinda get... but don't get the 'keep the song order' part.

So I think I'm 90% there.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 14, 2014, 06:59:42 pm
Ok,,,, yes, I get EXIF but can use an EXIF viewer to see things I might need say for a specific picture viewing / serving app.

And you can use a tag editor to view the tag information.

Or you can use a music player/manager app, most of which will read these tags.

Or, if you are really feeling "hardcore", you can run a command-line program to output them:

$ metaflac --list --block-type=VORBIS_COMMENT "Justin Sandercoe - 03 - From Katie's Window.flac"
METADATA block #2
  type: 4 (VORBIS_COMMENT)
  is last: false
  length: 165
  vendor string: reference libFLAC 1.2.1 20070917
  comments: 6
    comment[0]: Artist=Justin Sandercoe
    comment[1]: Album=Small Town Eyes
    comment[2]: Date=2011
    comment[3]: Title=From Katie's Window
    comment[4]: Tracknumber=03
    comment[5]: Genre=Pop


Quote
My problem was... what data do I need for the player/server app to do it's thing... again, I think i just hosed that entire ordeal when I went with wav..

Basically I need to be sure that Vorbis window pane has it's needed data.

Song
Artist
Album

Well, for most rippers, it will do it automatically using Internet databases, as well as giving you the option to manually enter/edit them before you start ripping. For instance, if I stick a CD into my computer and open it with K3B I get the following:

(http://i523.photobucket.com/albums/w359/Majik394/k3b1.png) (http://s523.photobucket.com/user/Majik394/media/k3b1.png.html)

(I had to go searching the house for a CD as all of my CDs are ripped and in storage)

This was pulled in from an Internet database called CDDB. If I want to edit any of the items before I rip, I can click on them to edit it. I can also edit the main album information:
(http://i523.photobucket.com/albums/w359/Majik394/k3b2.png) (http://s523.photobucket.com/user/Majik394/media/k3b2.png.html)

I don't know MediaMonkey or EAC, but I would expect them to do something similar. It's a pretty standard capability on ripping software.

That database lookup also includes other fields, such as the genre and tracknumber...

By ripping to WAV, you were basically telling the ripper to not bother with tag data, as it has nowhere to put them.

(Note there is a format known as Broadcast WAV or "BWF" for short, although it usually uses the .wav file extension, which does have some tag support)

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...and for whatever reason my songs lost their order. They simply got sorted alphabetically rather than mastering order.

If you have no metadata (tags) or if the format you use doesn't support them, most apps will sort in filename order.

Quote
So just so I am clear... what exact piece of data keeps the songs sorted properly.

Tracknumber (see the command line above)

There's also a CD number field that can be used for multi-CD sets, but most people I know just use the Tracknumber and renumber the whole lot from 1 upwards. The actual CD number it was originally on is pretty meaningless once you have ripped it.

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 14, 2014, 08:59:25 pm
By ripping to WAV, you were basically telling the ripper to not bother with tag data, as it has nowhere to put them.

Ok, that's what I just wanted to be absolutely sure of... iow... I won;t have that problem by default with FLAC unless I somehow create it on purpose.

Quote
So just so I am clear... what exact piece of data keeps the songs sorted properly.

Tracknumber (see the command line above)

Ok, again that is what was throwing me because it looks like in your screen shots the Track # is only part of file name and you said file name basically carried no weight. I see how that command line has now looked inside the file and sees that FKW is track 03 but I don;t see that info anywhere but in file name. So I was wondering how the hell do I know what I ended up with after the rip? Do you see what I mean?

and yes EAC will go the Freedb or whatever and pull that info... I simply didn't realize I was telling it to go get the info and then recording it to a format that was saying ok, toss that extra mess we don't do that.

Ok, I appreciate it ordeal of explaining it... I just had this feeling of uncertainty. I don;t really need a lot of data or care much about all the extras. I'll take them if easy enough to get but I sure don't want to do this again and find out... oohhhh, you left off that one little piece of data that would have made all work.

Britney Spears eh? Who would have guessed...

Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 14, 2014, 09:29:47 pm
By ripping to WAV, you were basically telling the ripper to not bother with tag data, as it has nowhere to put them.

Ok, that's what I just wanted to be absolutely sure of... iow... I won;t have that problem by default with FLAC unless I somehow create it on purpose.

You shouldn't do. To convince yourself, do a test rip. It's always good to do that anyway, to get used to the software and to understand things like where the files end up, etc.

Quote
Quote
So just so I am clear... what exact piece of data keeps the songs sorted properly.

Tracknumber (see the command line above)

Ok, again that is what was throwing me because it looks like in your screen shots the Track # is only part of file name and you said file name basically carried no weight. I see how that command line has now looked inside the file and sees that FKW is track 03 but I don;t see that info anywhere but in file name. So I was wondering how the hell do I know what I ended up with after the rip? Do you see what I mean?

No, I don't...

(http://i523.photobucket.com/albums/w359/Majik394/easytag1-1.png) (http://s523.photobucket.com/user/Majik394/media/easytag1-1.png.html)

:D

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 14, 2014, 10:04:45 pm
OOOOOHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!! I see it now..... Man... these glasses from the dollar store... I guess I need to upgrade them too.

OK... 10-4...... I've got it now.... Nationwide!!!!




Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: old-and-in-the-way on February 16, 2014, 12:50:18 am
TB, you could probably use a PI for that, but bear in mind that you will need a display of some sort. Raspberry Pi uses both HDMI and RCA video out, so you could do that somehow. You could maybe code for a small LCD display, but I don't know how well that would work with what you are planning.

I haven't read beyond this point, so apologies if it's been mentioned already, but the pi does have headers for mobile phone screen modules.

HOWEVER, I wouldn't use a pi for web browsing (even if only banking) because the responsiveness would be painful -- until there's an X11 backend for the Pi's GPU, you're running X on the arm part alone, and it's likely to be very frustrating to use.

Mind you, I have a pi with 1TB RAID1 over USB, and that's even more painful than X would be, so feel free to ignore me as inconsistent and full of crazy talk.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 16, 2014, 12:57:47 am
Ah.. ok.. I was not aware of any of that... I think there is simply just a lot I don't get about the whole concept. I should have one in hand by next week though so perhaps once I see it, things will become a bit more clear.

It's kind of odd to me they seem like they can be fairly powerful and then on the other hand apparently can't do things which I think of as simple... like browsing.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: old-and-in-the-way on February 16, 2014, 01:03:58 am
You may find the browsing performance is acceptable for your needs.  If it isn't, it'ss be because X has a fairly hefty memory footprint and CPU overhead, the graphics toolkits (Gtk+, Qt and friends) are quite hefty beasts and web browsers themselves also tend to be quite resource heavy these days.  All of them together may make things a bit slow.  Everything should still work just fine (my pi with the raid often gets a load average of 10 or so, which usually means a heavily loaded system, but can still keep up -- problems only really kick in for me when the load average hits 30 (can happen when copying lots of large files from my old backup disk to the raid-over-usb), at which point things can start to get a bit upset)


edit to add: And it occurs to me that I should probably explain load average if I want that lot to make sense.  Load average is a count of the number of processes in a given state in a given period of time.  The states are "running" (ie, using actual CPU cycles) and "uninterruptible sleep" (ie, things waiting for something to be read from the filesystem).  A load average that is equal to the number of CPUs indicates that the system has very few wasted cycles (it's a very rough measure).  Actual performance depends as much on the cause of the current load average as the load average itself.

I think I just made this all very confusing.  It's 1am here and I'm clearly in no fit state to speak sense :-S
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 18, 2014, 04:12:22 pm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v0pLdY2Ap5Q

This guy has overclocked to 1G but that looks pretty fast to me.... At least for paying bills and the few simple things I will need to do it should work.

Also I got to thinking.... If the OS is on an SD card, can't I also configure the SD card for banking to boot up with the stuff I need saved to the desktop and then simply have that ready when I want to pay bills and boot it... or perhaps even have a banking usb dongle.

That way the rest of the time the Pi can be used for something else.

Am I thinking about this wrong. Can't I configure an SD card and it boots. then on my desktop are say 5 shortcuts to 5 banks/bills and one document with my passwords. So I click teh links, login and do what i have to do.

Then shut down, remove SD card, put in new card and I have a whole new computer. Put banking SD in safe place... and I suppose there must be some way to make a backup image of it should it get lost or go bad?
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: old-and-in-the-way on February 18, 2014, 05:21:22 pm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v0pLdY2Ap5Q

This guy has overclocked to 1G but that looks pretty fast to me.... At least for paying bills and the few simple things I will need to do it should work.

For relatively simple things it'll probably be fine, just don't expect it to be as fast as your desktop/laptop.

Quote
Also I got to thinking.... If the OS is on an SD card, can't I also configure the SD card for banking to boot up with the stuff I need saved to the desktop and then simply have that ready when I want to pay bills and boot it... or perhaps even have a banking usb dongle.

Yep.

Quote
That way the rest of the time the Pi can be used for something else.

That's pretty much how they intended it to be used.

Quote
Am I thinking about this wrong. Can't I configure an SD card and it boots. then on my desktop are say 5 shortcuts to 5 banks/bills and one document with my passwords. So I click teh links, login and do what i have to do.

Yep.

Quote
Then shut down, remove SD card, put in new card and I have a whole new computer. Put banking SD in safe place... and I suppose there must be some way to make a backup image of it should it get lost or go bad?

Yep.  From a linux system with an SD card reader and a hard disk, something along the lines of:

Code: [Select]
sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt
sudo dd if=/dev/mmcblk0p2 of=/mnt/desired/path/to/image/sdcard.img

Should work -- the image will be called sdcard.img in desired/path/to/image/ in the filesystem on the hard disk.

The commands given above will be more or less what you want on a raspberry pi with a USB HDD.

On a linux desktop or laptop with an sd card reader, try:

Code: [Select]
sudo dd if=/dev/mmcblk0p2 of=~/desired/path/to/images/sd-card.img
If your distribution or configuration does not use sudo, su to root and use the commands without sudo.

Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 18, 2014, 05:52:15 pm
Fantastic.... I don't know why it just hit me that every SD card can be a whole new device. I suppose because I saw so many people using multiples but I suppose they all had specific tasks. Like the media server I do intend to have one for that but for this one it's good to know I can mess around with it. ... and even if I break it, it's not like I can't bank on my regular pc.

Thanks for the code... I'm actually starting to almost see what some of it means...

Quote
sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt

subuser ( I become root user? ) mount ( mount a device for use ) /dev/sda1 ( directory /dev/hard drive 1 partition 1 ) /mnt ( go to this directory )   

Quote
sudo dd if=/dev/mmcblk0p2 of=/mnt/desired/path/to/image/sdcard.img

sub user ... dd ( copy a file ) if=/dev/mmcblk0p2 ( lost me on that one... If, in the /dev directory .. there is a jar of M&Ms???     of=( still lost ) /mnt/desired/path/to/image/sdcard.img ( this writes the image to that directory tree on some other Linux drive ( not the Pi ) (or a linux drive attached to Pi).. not real clear where this drive is... seems like it must be some other Linux machine.

What exactly does that sound like in laymans terms?
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: old-and-in-the-way on February 18, 2014, 06:30:52 pm
Yeah, more or less

sudo is "super user do", ie "run the following command as root"

dd is "disk duplicate" (if is "input file" and of is "output file")

/dev/mmcblk0p2 is the device file for partition 2 on the 0th multimedia card block device

/dev/sda1 is the first partition on the first hard HDD (prior to kernel 2.6 you'd have had hdXY for IDE disks and sdXY for SCSI disks -- that all got harmonised several years ago)

/mnt/desired/path/to/image/sdcard.img is the mounted filesystem from an external HDD (eg, one plugged into one of the USB ports (most likely via a powered USB hub, since any HDD caddy taking its power over USB will leave too little for the pi to be able to run)

Did I miss anything?

You can mount disks on other systems in  a variety of ways (CIFS using windows file sharing on windows, or samba on linux/macosx, NFS, sshfs and probably others) but we'll consider those advanced topics for now.

Also under "advanced topics" is using netcat (possibly with ssh tunnels to hop NAT or firewalls)  to copy files arbitrarily across networks.



Edit to add:  So, in layman's terms, "duplicate the file /dev/mmcblk0p2 byte for byte and stick the result in /path/to/sdcard.img"
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: old-and-in-the-way on February 18, 2014, 06:41:29 pm
You may think "this dd stuff is weird.  Why not just use copy?" -- device files are special, and using copy on them will likely do the wrong thing.

In general, though, use copy (cp) not dd.

Other commands worth knowing:

Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 18, 2014, 06:46:46 pm
Ahh.... ok... that multimedia block is over my head   and I need to find a little pocket glossary of terms...

The wiki stuff gets a little too out there...

I kinda saw the general idea but there are always  some terms in the middle that throw me. I wish that new book would be out before June... I think I'll drop by the library and pick up the most recent general reference I can find.

I was just wondering.. .that Coursa web site might have some intro Linux classes I could attend. I need to check that out.

It seems like its not so bad but I think I will need a handy reference... even if I have to write my own for whatever I'm dealing with. IOW, I might fumble my way through it once, but the next day, I'm like how the hell did I do that?
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: old-and-in-the-way on February 18, 2014, 06:53:44 pm
This is the reference I used (in, uhm, 1995 or so) (http://unixhelp.ed.ac.uk/).  Surprisingly little has changed.

as for "multimedia block" -- you don't need to care about that.  Just know that /dev/mmcblkX is an SD card, and /dev/mmcblkXpY is a partition on that same SD card.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 18, 2014, 07:00:16 pm
  •   rm - remove (anybody who tells you to do anything that looks like "sudo rm -rf /" or "rm -rf /" shouldn't be trusted and is trying to get you to trash your system, so don't do that!)
I once had a fairly new job... it was about 2 minutes to 5 on a Friday Holiday weekend... most everyone had left. I had about maybe 50-60 upper management on my floor. Netware servers. I had to install whatever anyone needed and be sure they had all the rights.

So they kept the MS Office stuff on one of the servers. Someone walks up and needs Excel right now. There was something about the local instal that needed to be deleted and then pull the new setup of the server and install that..... I got mixed up....... deleted the whole shooting match off the server.....!!!

So I call this guy that worked in my group.... he was at another office and of all things in a meeting with my boss.... AND... they put me on speaker phone..... I tried to save face a bit by asking why the delete inhibit flag wasn't on.....( "because you're not supposed to delete the files!!" ).. Damn... how embarrassing. Anyway... very big company so I just had to call the backup guys and wait around on the empty floor until I got all that done.... so yeah,,, I'm kind of familiar with that delete everything feeling...

Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 19, 2014, 03:25:05 am
On a slightly related note, i got a new router for my parents, but the antennas somehow didn't seem to be as powerfull as the ones on the old WRT54G, and WiFi reception in the kitchen was lacking, resulting in rather spotty radio play from the Pi MusicBox.
Normally i'd have re-purposed the old WRT54G with DD-WRT and made it into a repeater, but the poor thing was dying as it was, so i had to think of something else...
So i went full hacker mode and made three of these : http://www.freeantennas.com/projects/template2/index.html
Two i put on the actual antennas so they'd beam most of their signal towards the kitchen area, then i made the third rather oversized and put it behind the router so a lot of the signal normally bouncing into the wall behind it would reflect towards their desktop PC.
Result ? About 9 DB gain in signal strength in the kitchen, resulting in a strong enough signal for the Pi to continue it's life as their newfound webradio/spotify streamer, and their signal now overpowers the nextdoor neighbours' WiFi signal so much that i can barely see it anymore on my WiSpy  8)
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 19, 2014, 05:46:15 am
I've heard they are good.... never made one though. You know what's funny,,, I bought one of those WRT54 routers yesterday. Found a GS with the higher mem and flash. Going to try to set up a mesh node to see if anyone else is around. There is a Ham radio distro and we can legally use CH1.

The thing I don't understand is, and I would need another router to find out... but it tells you to not change the SSID... so you stay on this particular mesh made for ham radio. Then it says don;t change that unless you know what you are doing. So I am thinking can't I just get two or more routers and change the name and have a private mesh... OR... is there places in the code that references that SSID and the code will break. I'm thinking no, but who knows.

================================ On yet another Pi note.....

So tell me something... I only use a cell phone but it somehow possible to have an IP phone without buying phone services.... I'm not real clear what he's doing here... The reason I ask is because I have to pay $120 a year for an Internet fax service and no one really sends faxes any longer but I can't take a chance just yet to not have one.

I'm also still using an iPhone 3 on AT&T.... I know they sell other lines and I know my ISP sells phone lines... but am I mistaken that there is no way for me to get around this whole phone line deal or fax deal without actually buying the service.... and if you buy the service.... why not just pick up the phone and make a call?  Apparently he has a remote office he is typing into or something?

Anyway.... anyone see any potential here for me to cut some costs or enhance my current setup... I am thinking of upping to iPhone 5 because there is a couple of apps I can use to make my work a bit easier but AT&T screws you on that deal too since they won't let you tether. I'm just kinda thinking about if and how I should rework some of my setup.

Oh, I also saw these things and for under $100 you can add a Motorola dock to a Pi which gives you a nice keyboard and folding screen. You have make some cables but no big deal.






Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 20, 2014, 03:41:56 am
Ok, some questions then to clear up some things i'm wondering about TB :
1) Mesh network ?
Why would you want to lay out a mesh network ?
It's complicated work, would take a LOT of routers/AP's to set up, a lot of time, and serves no purpose outside complicated, large scale corporate settings...
Unless you have a ranch that spreads several acres and you want WiFi all over the place.
Again, you seem to be making things FAR more complicated than they need to be.
I'm not trying to take the piss by saying that, i just mean to save you some time and effort here.

2) Wait, what, you're not allowed to use channel 1 ?
(http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b366/DanielGravesNL/Untitled_zps7f214e04.jpg)
I can't see any reason not to, it's in the 2.4 Ghz region, pretty sure HAM/Amateur Radio isn't using those bands.
I think there may be restrictions on channels 12 and upwards, but channel 1 ?
Not to my knowledge.

3) Not changing SSID ?
Then how the xx--xx are you supposed to tell your AP apart from all the others ?
I don't give a xx--xx what the manuals say, i've been changing my SSID's to funky names since i first started wardriving with my brother and we ran a Rogue AP off a secondary car battery.
See the picture above, and guess which AP's are run by me..

On your Pi question : i have no idea what you're asking here.

What Hackman is doing is replacing a rather large in home PBX (basically a digital switchboard) with the Pi to handle his incoming phonecalls around the whole place, run through Skype.
Basically he bought Skype's service where they provide you with a local phone number which anyone can call from any phone and also from Skype, so he can 'cheaply' make and receive calls from all across the globe.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 20, 2014, 04:46:13 am
I think you mis-read my post. Licensed amateur radio -can use legally- 2390 - 2450Mhz

So that's below CH1 and up to CH8 but I think they like to use CH1 because of the free space in the low end. The channels are 22Mhz wide ....

Although yours is 44Mhz wide for some reason. Why is your bandwidth so wide?

So anyway there has been an every growing mesh based on this one distro named HSMM-MESH. I just wanted to fire one up and see what's out there near me.

But.... I was simply wondering.... if I were to change the SSID... would that software still work,,, maybe it will maybe it won't.... it was invented for the HAM radio community.

=== About the other thing.... I must have missed the Skype thing... I forget about Skype... still never tried it...

But maybe you didn't know... I got my technician and general class license for radio over a year ago and am studying for my Extra class now.... and all this mess overlaps. The only way you can really get it is to simply jump in and do it. So I thought that mesh network was pretty cool.

with that mesh network, provided there were enough nodes, if the systems went down, we would still have a mini Internet so to speak. There are a lot of people over here prepping for the possibility of unfun things happening.... and they aren't the nut jobs you see on TV.... communications is good thing to have and it something I sort of have a feel for..... so for this particular thing it's sort an exercise in learning. Where you are thinking node per floor, or three nodes in a big building the HAM mesh is thinking nodes 10+ miles apart, and mobile nodes. There are people actually creating solar powered repeaters and lets say a node as well and hiding them on mountain tops, and that increase your distances by miles. It's not like a regular wifi network..... and it's fast... a lot faster than other HAM radio data links. So for instance... Let's say I had a node in my home. then I got somewhere say 10 miles away... I could actually access my own Internet connection..... and that's why I would need my own SSID of course.... otherwise the entire mesh would have access to my Internet connection.

Also... and this gets real complicated... I still don't understand it but through software,,, radio signals can be super weak, like hidden in the noise floor, and still be recovered..

The Pi stuff is really for my enjoyment and hopefully to make my life a bit more easy/enjoyable.

..... btw... I'll see that bandwidth and raise you 8dB

(http://i1026.photobucket.com/albums/y324/TB-AV/Loop.jpg)

ETA: .. I guess one thing I was asking about the phone stuff is... is there something I am missing or could do with this asterisk stuff to where my iPhone could be put to better use.... Like could I take calls on an IPPhone desk phone instead of having to use the iPhone itself.... IOW... am I missing anything with all this new technology or not so new... but I haven't bothered to use it.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 20, 2014, 07:20:08 am
You told me about getting your radio license, i think i even looked up some sites for you a while back.
Reading back, i now assume when you mention CH1-CH8 you mean the radio channels for your actual radio, not the channels on the WRT54.
Anyways, back to business : my bandwidth is so wide because, as you'll note, i'm using channel 1+5, as i'm running a max rate of 300 (i believe this is called channel bonding, or has to do with it, but don't quote me on that).

I'm not getting why you'd want to join in on an existing Mesh network, as it would be insecure by definition.
It could be fun to do just for the heck of it, but the novelty of such things wears off fast.
You're also forgetting that it's just a meshed WiFi, not a proper network.
For it to be able to serve as a replacement of the internet in the case of network trouble due to some calamity, it would need to have the equivalent of a DNS system to be useful for communication, and it still would be only local, and any website not directly tied in would be unreachable, UNLESS one of the nodes (or several) still had landline internet access...
But then ALL the network communications out to the internet would have to run through that one node (or the several nodes).
It'd be easier to use HAM/CB radio to keep tabs on everyone/everything.

As for the PBS software, i'm not sure if you could use it the way you're asking, i'd have to dig into it's workings.
Perhaps Keith or old-and-in-the-way can answer it off the top of their heads...

And yeah, nice DB's you got there, but unless you're also in a concrete building, about 30 feet away from the router with 2 walls in between the PC and the router...
I still win  ;D
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 20, 2014, 10:48:08 am
To run an IP Phone, you need a client. This is normally an application that runs on a PC or smartphone.

There are various devices called Analogue Telephone Adapters (ATA) and some routers which you can connect a normal phone into and which will allow it to use an IP phone service.

IP phone, more generically known as Voice over IP or "VoIP", can be done in a peer-to-peer fashion, across the Internet, with no additional cost. The person you are calling has to have an appropriately configured VoIP setup locally (which could just be a client app running on a PC). The biggest issue with this is addressing: telephone numbers. Telephone numbers are administered and assigned as part of a (normally paid for) service.  How do you locate and "dial" someone else without a telephone number?

Well, there are ways involving addresses which are very similar to email addresses (e.g. [email protected]), which work using standard DNS. There are open and freely available standards supporting all of this. It's totally possible for people to install a software client app on a PC or phone and to freely call other people on the Internet without needing any sort of service. The other person doesn't even need to be running the same software as you.

The trouble is, as with most things like this which are open, standard, and low-cost or free, most people don't know they exist because there is no-one advertising and promoting them. Proprietary and paid-for services have large advertising budgets and have the ability to get their message to everyday folk who, mostly, don't understand technology. Some people even struggle to understand the concept of how this stuff could possibly be free. Most people have been indoctrinated with the view that, in order to do anything, you need a bit of commercial software or a commercial service.

The result is, almost noone actually has this sort of setup. I used to, but I ran it for about 3 years and never, ever, used it because there was hardly anyone else to use it with (that I needed to talk to). It's a classic example of Metcalfe's Law (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metcalfe%27s_law).

By the way, the same client software and same standards can be used to connect with commercial VoIP services, and these are often lower cost than many of the traditional services, especially for International calling.

Although you can use proprietary services like Skype, there are, IMO, better services which are more standard. The standard in this case is a protocol known as "SIP".

As regards client software, if you can find a SIP client application that runs on an iPhone over Wifi, then you can connect into a SIP VoIP service, and maybe do P2P VoIP for what it's worth.

http://www.flynumber.com/blog/our-favorite-sip-client-for-iphone-and-android-mobile-devices/

By the way, this is an area of particular expertise of mine, as Telecommunications Engineering is what I do as my day job, and I have helped design VoIP services for some large carriers.

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 20, 2014, 02:58:59 pm
@Dan... watch this...(listen).
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6hywlosuIS0

Then watch this.... on 79mW of power. You can skip to 2:00 mark... but really just read the comments and watch the video stream  at end. They had a 50 mile Ultra Marathon. Spectators not allowed. So they set up a mesh for people on the other side of the mountain so they could watch the finish line...

HAM radio is not just talking... in fact... it's mostly not talking.. there are lots of digital modes. IOW it's not just talking and morse code.

Now on top of that hill, let's say there are no antennas... most likely there is a repeater out there but let's say there is not. Those guys could have also set up a repeater for their radios. Now again that would only give them the very slow digital modes of HAM radio. The radios they have probably won't go over that mountain easily,,, so now with repeater they can talk easily,,, AND,,, the MESH allows them to have live video as well. It's still all considered HAM radio... That area of 2930-2450 we have a license to use for ANY mode of communication. Like I say, I'm just learning about it... but as far as the thrill is gone deal... even if I don;t use it... If I powered up a node.... someone else in the HAM community can use it which is how the entire community works. It's a basically a worldwide array of repeaters and such that we all share.. For instance my little handheld radio can go maybe 10 miles. Well the local HAM radio club and the local Public Broadcasting station teamed up and they have a repeater way up on a hill and one on a tall building downtown. So I can talk through that repeater and get people all over the State.... and all this stuff is set up for digital modes as well.... but it's sloooooooow. So this MESH makes it fast. This network is not so much about doing private obscure things but rater making it open. a redundant safety net of communication should something bad happen........ but it got me thinking.... what if you did made it private.... it might interfere with normal one... or... anyway there are lots of implications.






@Majik ... ok, yeah, I guess you might know this stuff off the top of your head as Dan says.. What got me to thinking about it was from researching this RPi stuff... Here is a guy doing the RPi, HSMM-MESH, SIP(which I'm not real clear on)... and all that got the gears to grinding in my head..... especially if I could figure a way to set myself up a free fax system..... again that Fax is really only needed maybe once or twice a year..... I honestly don't know anyone that can't email it now but I know as soon as I turn it off, I get somebody that needs to fax..... I suppose I could just go to Kinkos or something.... but I got to thinking there must be some way to do this..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gosYvsQFkw8
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 20, 2014, 03:52:32 pm
Fax is slightly tricky over VoIP, as it's quite timing and loss sensitive.

If you have a standard phone line, you might be better just getting an old fax modem of some sort and connecting it to your PC.

I used to have a PC set up running Asterisk ( www.asterisk.org ) which had multiple trunks to various VoIP service providers, ENUM, and analogue trunks connecting to my incoming lines. This also had voicemail and faxmail capability, but the fax was largely reliant on the clocking that was provided by the relatively expensive Digium FXO/FXS PCI interface card I had installed. I don't have it any more because it rarely got used and, eventually, the server died (after about 4 years of continuous running).

I've been meaning to set it up again as a VM on my ESXi server, but that's a project for another day.

Prior to this (probably around 2001 or so), my server had a fax modem installed and running Hylafax configured so that would receive faxes and email them to me, and so that I could send faxes as a print service from any machine on the network.

These days I have a multi-function printer/scanner/copier type setup which also supports fax. I don't currently have it connected to a phone line, but if I needed it I could set something up quite quickly. I don't think I have received more than 3 faxes in the last 4-5 years, and have never in that time had the need to send one.

In my view, trying to set the Pi up to do something like this might be a fun project, but there's probably easier, more reliable and practical ways of doing it.

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 20, 2014, 04:03:49 pm
No phone lines.

I used to have a fax server as well when I had a phone line. I just figured there must be a modern easy way to do this. I'm basically spending $120 year for nothing. Seriously I think I have sent 2 faxes in 4 years and the ones I have received were totally un-necessary. BUT... I hate to be totally without the ability. I mean I don't have a phone line but I have an old wired phone 'just in case'.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 20, 2014, 04:38:49 pm
By the way, I'm familiar with Wifi mesh networks ( the music streaming system I use is based on one). I'm not familiar with HSMM-MESH nor any HAM radio stuff.

If you look around, there must be cheaper fax services. I used to subscribe to one which cost me £40 per year to have a fax to email service, with the option of a PDF to fax sending service.

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 20, 2014, 06:09:16 pm
I'm aware that HAM/Radio amateur bands can do far more than just send radio signals or morse (hell, remember that BBS documentary i always go on about ? check the start of episode 5 : https://archive.org/details/BBS.The.Documentary the gentleman talks about the first instance of teletype over licensed amateur radio, people sending what would later evolve into ANSI art over telegraph/teletype via the air, after they found out Telegraph operators had been doing it for aaaages before the HAM/Am. Radio guys found out about this).
I've seen video broadcasts and such, i've even got a friend who used to broadcast himself and his wife doing the 'danse with no pants' for the 'pleasure' of anyone who had a radio and wanted to watch (and he got shut down because of it).
So all of that ain't exactly news to me  ;)
Also, i assume you meant to link to a second video there ?

But yeah, just the first minute of that video clarified a whole heap on what you'd want with something like that;  your intentions and wants/need were a little vague.
From what i gathered, info wise, you'd need to keep things the way they have you set it up, SSID needs to remain the same most likely for it to work with the mesh network, at most tack on an extra number or something, but i'd need to do some in-depth RTFM'ing to give you a definitive answer on that, as i'm not sure how this system works when it comes to node recognition.
They've basically set up an emergency response network via HAM/Am. Radio with the help of cheap and simple WiFi routers.
Rather ingenious, but that's not surprising, considering the amount of engineers and folks with doctorates in all sorts of practical sciences that enjoy HAM/Am. Radio.
As you suspected, you'd have to keep it open, otherwise it fails it's purpose : open coms channel for everyone on that network, and another spread of their network.
It also most likely would not be accepted into the network if it wasn't and open node, but again, i'd have to RTFM to give you a definitive answer (but if this had been one of my projects, i'd guarantee you the node would have to be open to all, as that seems to be the whole idea behind it).
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 20, 2014, 09:42:42 pm
Oh yes, it has to be open... I know that for a fact.... what I was simply "wondering aloud" was.....

hmmmmm I wonder if a private mesh could be formed with this same software or is it written to not really allow for that? So yes, I will eventually RTFM and find out....

Yep, I meant to post this.... 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8LN8gMgz2pA

So you can see the video feed that people back on the other side of mountain could see... and... they can still just use the radios for voice comms... or hell they could have set everything up on the MESH but that would have probably been impractical for that experiment.

I'm going to look and see if I can find a web site that maps this MESH. Usually things have a web site somewhere or a piece of software that gps locates the nodes.

But... yes... I do know people that have ranches or work maybe 100 miles from home and trying to learn, prepare, develop methods of reliable comms in the event of a sudden bad situation so this might be something they could take advantage of...... and it appears that once set up.. it has a very low learning curve for the end user who might be a child, wife, non-computer type person, etc..
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 23, 2014, 05:52:19 pm
I haz Pi.

I thought it was broken. Hooked up HDMI but no display. Then tried Comp. and it was there.

Clicked on first line that said something about using the storage or something... and I just said ok, it rebooted and then the display switched over to HDMI.

Played around with this sprite prog named Scratch. Clicked on Help and CPU spiked to 100% and stayed there. It opened a window I never could get to away. Everything else continued to work but that window just would not go away.

But...... it looks like it works.... This will be my test/play unit. I have another on way for the media server.

Kinda odd how they stagger the USB and RJ45 jacks.. A bit rough on case design. I also didn't realize how few mico-usb cables I had... Luckily a couple of batteries I have, use them.

I need to find myself a small cheap keyboard.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 24, 2014, 07:30:05 am
Which PI model, A or B ?
(if you say model A, i will berate you for being cheap and tell you your cheapness is to blame for your PI's low performance, just FYI)
And what is the rating of your SD card ?
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 24, 2014, 01:33:13 pm
I'm pretty sure it's the B... I thought it was the B. Two mounting holes.  I am not sure about the rating on this card. It's an 8G Sandisk but I can't remember which speed it is. I -think- it's a 10 but it's a spare and I just remember. It's not very old.

btw... it's not performing low... it's actually pretty snappy considering... Just had that one window stuck and couldn't kill it.

Which reminds me.... the one for the media server will be here today and I need an SD card for it. Any specific recommendations? I generally try to buy them on special sales when they pop up but mat just have to order one. I forgot all about that.   I need a couple other little pieces/parts too.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: old-and-in-the-way on February 24, 2014, 06:49:08 pm
I'm pretty sure it's the B... I thought it was the B.

If it has ethernet, it's a B.  No network, it's A.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 25, 2014, 04:04:55 am
Transcend and Sandisk 10 rating SD's have always had my preference.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 25, 2014, 04:26:47 am
It's odd how these sd cards are so finicky. I bought a B&N Nook a while back.. and installed Android for Nook on it. The guy said the cards made a big difference... I luckily got one that worked even though he said the faster ones are not necessarily going to work. Then my gps says to basically just get an ordinary one because it's simply not going to use it.

It looks like the Pi has long list of them that will work... and a long list that won't. For the media server is there a size I should get. I see it seems to not care how large in size they are but I don't want to have it wasted. Is 8Gig enough? More?
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 25, 2014, 05:47:45 am
Over 4GB is a general rule of thumb, so 8 will be plenty.
Brands i mentioned i've tested myself with 2 different model B (and i mean different as in Rev.1 and rev.2) PI's.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on February 25, 2014, 03:48:22 pm
Ah, good, that should keep the cost down... They tend to go on sale because people mostly want the bigger ones. You know... I think my card in something is a Transend... Maybe it's in my camera.

Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on April 23, 2014, 12:52:54 am
http://www.coocox.org/epi.html
Just leaving this here for the Arduino crowd who would love to get into the RPi but can't because their Arduino stuff wouldn't easily be connected/interfaced with an RPi.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on April 23, 2014, 01:10:32 am
This stuff is growing like wildfire. Have you seen those new RPi boards that have the plugin cpu boards

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gm0S7U-T8V0

Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on April 23, 2014, 01:20:21 am
Actually missed that entirely, thanks for the link, looks like another little something that could be of real use for my plot to attain world domination tinkering needs  8)
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on April 23, 2014, 01:34:10 am
I guess at the end of the day, This thing ain't too shabby either... 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sPs8Jp2BBw4
It costs more but it seems to do quite a bit as well.

Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: bradt on May 07, 2014, 02:31:56 am
Not exactly pi, but I got the old beaglebone black off the shelf yesterday and put their new Debian distribution on there. It runs a lot better. I can even almost get wifi working. I'm using it as a headless system to control a small robot, so being able to get in through wifi would be huge. I'm using bluetooth now as a bandaid for data transfer, but would like to use the BT module for something else.

Dan, I ' m wondering if you can help me with this. In Wicd I can see my wireless, but it just times out trying to verify the access point connection when I put a static IP, or when trying to acquire an IP with DHCP. I've been over this all day and got nothing. If I disable the verification, it claims to connect fine, but there's no entries for the BBB in my clients table on the router, and it can't communicate out.

If you could point me in the right direction, I would be really grateful. Heck, I'd be glad just to get a direction that leads outside these circles I've been running around in all day trying to track this down.


Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on May 07, 2014, 03:15:50 am
If it's showing up in your router I don't think I would believe what it's telling you about connecting.

I had a bit of go round when I changed my router and getting the RBMC back online but it was more a matter of telling R-BMC to forget everything it ever knew about IP addresses then rebooting a couple times. Sort of 3rd time's the charm deal. In my way of thinking it -should- have worked the first time and I have no idea why it didn't.


There's a new one out now named BananaPi

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5pOiAMnUnw



BBB - some WiFi info

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HJ9nUqYMjqs

Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: bradt on May 07, 2014, 03:46:48 am
I reflashed the OS on it twice today, so I'm coming from a clean install. I put the bit about the router in because it may tell something important to someone more knowledgeable than I am, which would seem to be most three year olds and small puppies.

Derek Molloy has some great vidoes and blog, I was looking at the video you linked today. I used some of his stuff to get a few test projects working last year. He has some really nicely put together tutorials.

That banana pi looks cool. It looks like it is ready made for a media center.

This is going to be an interesting one coming out soon.
http://arduino.cc/en/Main/ArduinoBoardTre

Depending on price, it may be a real contender in the Beaglebone/Pi marketplace. It looks like it has both the headers from a Beaglebone black and an arduino, which means loads of GPIO.

I'm also thinking of getting this a Galileo to tinker with. The idea of an intel processor on one of these just seems cool.
www.adafruit.com/products/1637
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on May 07, 2014, 04:32:01 am
Yeah if your BBB is set up for acquire an IP via DHCP ( DHCP client ) which is totally different from handing out IP addresses as a DHCP server btw..... then it should sit there and wait for an IP.

Now in it's waiting, it may say, yep I'm cool, everything is working fine.

BUT... Your router is most likely NOT going be handing out addresses say from number 1-5 and show a report of.

Address 1 - Desktop PC
Address 2 - Laptop
Address 3 - Smart TV

and then that's it... it shows no more connections BUT your BBB says everything is cool, I'm connected.

It may tell you everything is cool from a lower level meaning it sees all the electrical signals and such but it doesn't really have a connection to the Router. Much the same way you might see your neighbors Router. You PC says, yep, I see it, I'm cool,... but it's not 'connected with an IP address'.

Have you gotten to anywhere that you need to input a password? It could be simply that. In fact, now that I recall. On my RBMC I had a problem entering the password... I was using a remote connection and for some reason I ended up having to enter it directly from the mouse by picking letters and numbers. I just remembered that.

So connected and acquire an IP address are two different things, but the fact it says you are connected sounds like you are very close.

I just don't know much about Linux to give you any any more insight. That's just general plumbing info, same for all OS.

Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: bradt on May 07, 2014, 05:06:25 am
Yeah, it can see the access point. I can change the security settings in the router admin and it's reflected when I refresh the list on the BBB. I tried changing the password around earlier, and got an invalid password error, so that's working.

It says connected if I provide a static IP and bypass the access point connection validation. If I use DHCP to have one assigned by the router, it fails at that point regardless. Both of these appear to be at the same point in the connection process judging from the logs.

Like you, I just don't know enough about Linux to know what's going on. I'll probably ask on one of the forums for this later, but wanted to make sure it's not someting simple first.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on May 07, 2014, 05:24:49 am
You're not trying to type the wrong PW are you.

You know the router has a PW to get into it's admin console then it SSID with it's PW.

Router named Home Router w/PW = HR_pw

SSID = Guitar w/PW = Blues   ---- You want this info in your BBB... not the stuff above.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on May 07, 2014, 07:15:17 am
I'll need more details, like which WiFi dongle you're using, what make and model router, what security protocol you're using (WPA/WPA2, which authkey, so WPA-PSK or enterprise, and which encryption, TKIP or CCMP).
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 04, 2015, 07:47:20 pm
Well, time to dig up this puppy as well...
Anyone else excited about the RPi 2.0 ?
I know TB-AV is, and i am for sure ever since i started running a website off one of my Pi's, but...
Anyone else ?
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: bradt on February 04, 2015, 07:58:31 pm
ooooh...didn't even know there was one coming. What's new?

This news comes at a good time. I recently picked up a 3D printer, and have dug out some of my old micro-controller projects now that I can fab up parts I need more easily.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 04, 2015, 08:04:34 pm
Quadcore ARMv7A processor @ 900 mhz, easily pushed to over 1ghz, 1 Gb of RAM, 4 USB ports like the RPi B+, MicroSD use instead of SD, same GPU still, less power consumption, and it just works a LOT faster for many applications, as seen in the video by RPi tv



Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: LievenDV on February 04, 2015, 09:46:17 pm
very tempting! If I didn't have so much projects already... :)
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: pt3r on February 06, 2015, 12:15:55 pm
I'll probably get an RPI2 (or 2) as an extra play box since the original RPI B is now running as my printer server/timemachine clone.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 07, 2015, 03:00:38 am
I'd get the RPI 2 then, if you're going for another B model.
Same cost, better performance.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: pt3r on February 10, 2015, 03:08:52 pm
I know but apparently it's a bit camera shy  ;D

http://www.raspberrypi.org/xenon-death-flash-a-free-physics-lesson/
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on February 10, 2015, 03:45:40 pm
I know but apparently it's a bit camera shy  ;D

http://www.raspberrypi.org/xenon-death-flash-a-free-physics-lesson/

That's a special feature design to reduce the otherwise inevitable proliferation of RP2 photos on social media sites.

Shame they can't do it with cats and babies. ;)

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 10, 2015, 06:10:22 pm
The xx--xx ?
Seriously, it reacts to Xenon lights ?  ???
Well i guess i'll not take any flash photo's of mine when it comes in then  :-X
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: pt3r on February 11, 2015, 09:07:08 am
I find this actually quite interesting  that
That's a special feature design to reduce the otherwise inevitable proliferation of RP2 photos on social media sites.

Shame they can't do it with cats and babies. ;)

Cheers,

Keith

...or grammy nominees and or attendees  ;)
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 21, 2015, 04:45:35 pm
Well, the RPi2 has arrived, this little thing does a lot of things a LOT faster  :o
It still needs optimization, and i suppose there's some work needed before Raspbian will fully make use of the multi-core setup, but so far it seems very promising.
Now i need to wait for some replacement layers for it's case to come in;  the B+ Pibow cases need a replacement 3rd layer to work with an RPi2.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: bradt on February 26, 2015, 06:03:17 am
I picked up a couple of ESP8266 modules the other day to use when I get my RPI. These things are awesome. You can get 5 for around $15 on ebay. With the GPIO and wifi capabilities, you have a great automation/networking module.

Can't wait to get my pi, and start my home automation project.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 26, 2015, 04:35:11 pm
I'd be careful with those modules bradt, they are capable of outputting a rather disturbingly strong signal, and unpredictably so...
I've used them on a signal jamming project that got confiscated by the local police, because instead of jamming everything within 300 feet, it turned out that it was capable of effectively jamming radio communications in a 1 mile radius  :o

On a less disturbing note, i now own two RPi 2's.
Hello, 24/7 torrent server !  ;D
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: bradt on February 26, 2015, 06:57:46 pm
wow!I figured they were powerful when it started crashing my USB to serial dongle, and I had to set up an external power supply. The current draw is surprising. I had no idea they were THAT powerful though. That's too funny.

Fortunately I don't expect the police to care quite as much about the small weather station I plan to put out back this spring to monitor soil/weather conditions for my garden. :)
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on February 26, 2015, 07:44:26 pm
Ok, that is a rather interesting project, considering the RPi foundation is doing an RPi based weather stations project for schools ATM, and they may eventually also sell them commercially, if the school projects prove succesfull.
Coincidence ?
I think not !
It's a sign from the FSM, i tell you !
*may we all be touched by his noodly appendages*
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on March 10, 2015, 08:31:15 am
Ok, i just saw an advertisement for this in MagPie, and colour me jubilant, i think i like it !
https://www.wyliodrin.com/
With this kind of service, even a child could 'code' a routine to blink some leds on a breadboard.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: pt3r on March 10, 2015, 11:42:25 am
Yes and with a bit of luck it triggers their curiosity to delve deeper into this whole 'programming' stuff thus developing some new useful skills.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on March 12, 2015, 05:41:00 am
Yes and with a bit of luck it triggers their curiosity to delve deeper into this whole 'programming' stuff thus developing some new useful skills.

Indeed, and while i agree with Linus (Torvalds) that we shouldn't want to turn everyone into programmers, we should nurture those who show an aptitude for it...
If this particular visual coding style were to take hold in combination with the RPi, it could help identify children with a higher aptitude for programming and logic.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on March 12, 2015, 11:38:59 am
A bit like Science (my wife is a secondary-level Physics teacher) we should introduce programming to kids at an early age, try to present it in a positive light, and encourage them if they want to do it later on in their education, but not force them to.

<rant>
The "presenting it in a positive light" is the difficult bit because society has been promoting anti-intellectualism for the last few decades, framing many academic subjects and careers, especially Scientists, Engineers, Developers, etc. as being social outcasts. Unfortunately we live in a world where ignorance and dishonesty is often valued and rewarded over knowledge and integrity.

Despite living in a world where technology surrounds us, the last 2 or 3 generations of kids leaving education seem to have less understanding of computers than those who went to school in the 1980s.

It's encouraging that this is being recognised a bit (at least in the UK) but the approaches being taken to remedy the situation seem pretty ineffective and, in some cases, counter-productive.
</rant>

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: pt3r on March 12, 2015, 12:14:55 pm
I will get some stick for this but I'm convinced that political correctness has pushed our modern society into the celebration of mediocrity. There is no such a thing as equality in nature, some animals are stronger some are more intelligent, others are faster etc, to ignore that is completely stupid.

I'm all for equal rights for everyone but don't tone down the education level in favor of the least intelligent pupil.  Make sure that each student gets the level of education that will develop his/her talents to the fullest.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on March 12, 2015, 12:42:19 pm
I agree to an extent.

I would argue that Political Correctness is a thing because the application of "fairness" in society is often misplaced or misappropriated.

But in the case of STEM in UK schools, the problem isn't Political Correctness. It's clueless Government desperately trying to address a problem that is of their own making and applying some band-aids.

By the way, this isn't a dig at any particular party. Governments of all colours and sizes (including LEAs) have been complicit in this, back from the early 90s when they removed IT from the curriculum and replaced it with secretarial skills (aka. how to use MS Office). Microsoft was pretty much gifted the education market and were allowed to indoctrinate management, teachers, and kids with their ecosystem. I wonder how many people got back-handers from that!

Now they are trying to fix this and other problems by forcing kids, including disruptive kids who really don't have the skills for STEM, to study Science and Maths to A Level whether they want to or not. And, yes, it drags the smart kids down.

Keeping kids in school this way also keeps them off the unemployment stats.

The other motivation for this (and this is party specific) is school league tables: the current Government seem hell-bent on wresting control of schools from LEAs (who they only have limited control over) and league tables is the blunt instrument they are using: the aim is to be able to judge schools as "failing" and then turn them into Academies or Free Schools.

For instance, a lot of kids aren't capable of getting a GCSE or A-Level in Science, but could probably get a BTEC qualification. In my wife's old school they had a lot of kids on the BTEC track. The Government have now changed the measurements so that BTEC no longer counts, and that has resulted in schools pushing these kids into GCSEs and A-Levels instead just to keep the stats up and to avoid being seen as "failing".

Of course, this disadvantages all the kids.

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Cue Zephyr on March 17, 2015, 07:51:48 pm
Right. So as you know, I have a Pi 2 Model B.

Me, I would like to have access to PHP and Ruby as CLI as well as part of Apache/Rails. PHP because it's a language I know quite well and have already written a cronjob for the heck of it. As for Ruby, it's a lnaguage I really would like to have a go at.

Currently, I have php5-cli installed (because I needed at least something), but I haven't installed Apache or Ruby (or Rails).

What would you recommend I do an't don't install to do this?

Not that I won't use Python, but that's obviously already pre-installed on the Pi.

Question aside, I have a project in mind that involves a facial expression recognition algorithm developed by Fraunhofer IIS and see if I can make it into an interactive music player. It's a bit of a branch-out fromt he uni project I did with a group not that long ago.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on March 17, 2015, 08:45:45 pm
I suggest a version control system like git or subversion. Git is the current fashion and, I think, is easier to manage local versioning with.

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Cue Zephyr on April 01, 2015, 12:51:10 am
The filesystem keeps crashing. This will be the fourth time within 2-3 weeks that I have to re-image the OS onto the SD card. However, I used diskpart this time to clean up the disk first before burning. Maybe it helps, I don't know.

I do shut it down correctly with iether halt -p or shutdown -h now, but it still seems to crap out at one out of a couple boot-ups.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: pt3r on April 01, 2015, 08:48:45 am
Could it be that your (micro)SD card is faulty? Have you tried already with a new card?
Did you upgrade your system to the latest versions?

I never had any of those issues but then again I never shut down the PI.
My biggest issue I have had so far with the raspi is that for no clear reason it shuts down the SSH daemon after a while leaving it inaccessible from the network, which is a pain in then neck since you have to connect a keyboard and screen to log in and restart the SSH daemon.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on April 01, 2015, 03:17:11 pm
I've had that issue before as well cue, was the SD card dying.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on April 01, 2015, 04:33:03 pm
I too have had sd card issues with Pi. The card is fine but simply not suited to the Pi. Same thing with my android based Nook HD... the software vendor even sells his known good sd cards just to make life easier if you run his os.

There are usually lists of known good, iffy, and flat just won't word.. .sd cards that otherwise would be fine.

Bu by all means use that sd formatter as a first step.

https://www.sdcard.org/downloads/formatter_4/index.html
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Cue Zephyr on April 01, 2015, 09:39:13 pm
It's the only  microSD card I have, so no, not yet. I have updated/upgraded (in that order, too) tothe latest version.

I have the Integral SDHC 16GB class 10 Ultima Pro card that's on this list (http://elinux.org/RPi_SD_cards). I screwed it up once by expanding filesystem after installing updates, but it kept failing at random boot-ups since. Sometimes it even boots up fine after throwing errors and rebooting it. Just not always.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Cue Zephyr on April 04, 2015, 12:52:52 am
Figured it out. I thought my Pi was off a couple of times, while in reality it just dropped the WiFi adapter for some reason, making SSH connection impossible.

Yesterday it happened (without yet knowing what really happened), when I couldn't connect, hooked up keyboard and monitor to discovered the Pi was still running but just not connected.

So what I did in essence, was powering down the system without halting it first.

At least I got nginx to work again in 20 minutes instead of 2 hours that it took me originally. I will however install MySQL since I couldn't quite get PostgresQL to work. I had it down to the point where both Pi and pgAdmin could connect to the database, but I couldn't figure out how to create a table in pgAdmin and the PDO (PHP) query creating a database didn't show up in pgAdmin.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on April 04, 2015, 06:21:01 am
http://www.raspipress.com/2014/06/tutorial-install-nginx-and-php-on-raspbian/
That might help with Nginx, PHP and MySQL.
It is rather specific on certain things but it's a good starterguide in any case.
Also don't forget :
Code: [Select]
sudo mysql_secure_installation
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Cue Zephyr on April 05, 2015, 05:59:00 pm
Thanks Dan. Already had nginx working. Doing MySQL installation right now.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Cue Zephyr on April 20, 2015, 11:10:38 pm
Right, so I'm having a confusing ole' time trying to set-up static IPs for multiple networks the Pi could be connected to.

One is always wireless, because the router is outside the house, the other could be either wireless or by cable, from one of two APs.

How do I set this up? I keep having to hook up a monitor to see what's actually going on (and I do end up getting it to work). I'd like the Pi to autoconnect to whatever of its known routers is in range. Right now, when I boot it up when I'm near the second configured router, it still scansfor the first one.

I haven't bothered messing with eth0 settings since I don't have a monitor near those places so I can't see what I"m doing and I obviously can't SSH to the Pi when I don't know 1) if it's connected and 2) what its IP actually is or 3) if I butchered the interfaces or wpa_supplicant.conf files in the process.

Right now, all I've written down is the "address" line in the interfaces file, and the wireless networks have "id_str" assigned in wpa_supplicant.conf file.

I've only been looking at it in more depth on one router, but when it's set to dhcp, virtual hosts (port forwarding) works, but once I set "address" to something like 192.168.1.113 (outside the dhcp pool), I can find it on LAN (from my computer or from my phone), but the router doesn't want to forward to it (so I can't access it from outside the network unless it's set to dhcp)

That's a lot of issues in a single post. :o

ETA: xx--xx it, have screenshots! ;D
interfaces:
(http://i.gyazo.com/5c215a9f1850bd6748f82a2a1ec70c99.png)
wpa_supplicant.conf:
(http://i.gyazo.com/bdf0bff6234a0f832b67dc301ac5798b.png)

ETAM:
route -n says the gateway is 0.0.0.0, so that basically means it's got no gateway to the outside world, right?
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on April 20, 2015, 11:49:40 pm
I can't tell exactly what you have going on but it looks like you are not on the same subnet.

IOW x.x.1.x vs x.x.0.x

so for instance if you dhcp pool was x.x.1.1-100   then that subnet would also see x.x.1.113 but not x.x.0.113 ... you could ping it but you need to tell everything to look and listen there too.

also when you "outside".. .do you mean way outside... as in another network? Because 192.168 is not routable over the Internet.


I might be off base here but that's kinda what I'm seeing and again, I'm not real clear of what you have going.


ETA to your ETA.. yes... you seem to have no gateway.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on April 21, 2015, 12:11:29 am
Ehm, Cue, save yourself some trouble;  set the static ip's at router/AP level.
It'll be better for your sanity, trust me.
You're (as TB-AV noted) seemingly dealing with separate subnets here, which is odd.
And it will complicate things.

As a question : why in the name of RNGsus' joynuggets is the router outside ?
And to pose another one : why are there several routers/AP's in the network ?

Hell, if you need more personal help in Dutch, you know how to contact me  8)
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Cue Zephyr on April 21, 2015, 09:32:20 am
"Outside" means outside the front door, that's where the power control and fuses are located, as well as the fiber connection box.

Note that home1 and home2 are different networks in different locations. ;)
For home1, the dhcp pool is 0.2 to 0.100, for home2 the pool is from 1.2 to 1.100 so yes you are right, but it doesn't matter for now. I will see if I can reconfigure one of the routers to match the subnets to make life easier.

As for router-level static IP assigning, one of the routers can do this, the other is so non-feature packed that it can't do that (it's a xx--xx ass Davolink box).

So from what I understand, if I want this to work from the Pi, regardless of which network I'm on, I should add the subnet (like 255.255.255.0) and gateway (like 192.168.1.1 or 0.1) IPs, correct?
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on April 21, 2015, 10:11:56 am
Dan is right: you are far better off configuring the IP address with DHCP and fixing the IPs from the router if you can.

By the sound of it you can't with one of your routers, but it's going to make your life a lot easier if you can replace it with something better. ADSL routers are pretty cheap these days, especially on ebay.

One problem with manually configured addresses, as you have found, is that it's not practical to move a device with a static address to a new network with a different IP address range. Yes, changing the two addresses so the ranges match should work, but it's a bit of a hack. DHCP is the real answer here.

I've only been looking at it in more depth on one router, but when it's set to dhcp, virtual hosts (port forwarding) works, but once I set "address" to something like 192.168.1.113 (outside the dhcp pool), I can find it on LAN (from my computer or from my phone), but the router doesn't want to forward to it (so I can't access it from outside the network unless it's set to dhcp)

...

route -n says the gateway is 0.0.0.0, so that basically means it's got no gateway to the outside world, right?

I think you are on the right track here (although all would be solved by using DHCP).

I'm guessing your subnet is 192.168.1.xxx in which case 192.168.1.113 is fine as an IP address.

The route appears to be the problem, which is why you can find it on your LAN but not communicate beyond that.

Regarding the netmask, this is used in conjunction with the IP address to determine which other IP addresses are in the same subnet (assumed to be on the same LAN). For those IP addresses it will communicate directly on the LAN without using routing tables. For all other IP addresses it will use routing tables. Under normal circumstances you should have the same netmask for all computers on your LAN.

In your case the netmask is probably 255.255.255.0 (also known as "/24").

Your netmask is almost certainly correct. Unless you've configured it otherwise, as the default for the 192.168.x.x range is normally 255.255.255.0 but it's worth checking.

The real problem appears to be routing (used when the IP address is outside your LAN range). For your purposes you need a "default route"  which points at the IP address of your router (aka "gateway"). This is basically saying "for all other addresses send it to the router to deal with".

You can configure that temporarily using:

sudo route add default gw 192.168.1.1

(assuming 192.168.1.1 is your router IP address).

However, that will not survive a reboot.  To make it survive a reboot you need to a configuration to the configuration files somewhere, such as /etc/network/interfaces where something like this should do it:

gateway 192.168.1.1

Or get a better router and just use DHCP which does this stuff automagically.

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on April 21, 2015, 01:30:00 pm
http://www.instantsupportsite.com/self-help/raspberry-pi/raspberry-configure-static-ip-eth0/

https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=27&t=18907

http://www.megaleecher.net/Fixed_IP_For_Raspberry_Pi


Cue, I think you are just missing your gateway... IOW, the address is just sitting there not knowing what else is out there.

I would try
192.168.1.113
255.255.255.0
192.168.1.1

192.168.0.113
255.255.255.0
192.168.0.1

but those links seem to have a few other settings you may try as well.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on April 21, 2015, 05:47:38 pm
What you can try to find things in the network is a simple app for your phone;  Fing works well for me on Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.overlook.android.fing&hl=en and i hear the apple version works just as well : https://itunes.apple.com/en/app/fing-network-scanner/id430921107?mt=8
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Cue Zephyr on April 21, 2015, 10:40:27 pm
Great explanatory work Majik, that's extremely clear - thanks!

The problem is, is that I do have a spare router (NetGear, useful little box), but the ISP (Tele2, Dan may have heard of it) requires login that is embedded within the firmware of the Davolink router and I'm not sure if it's worth having a swing at hacking it so another router can be used with the same credentials.

The router on the 0.x network may be advanced enough to set static IPs at router level. I think it's a fairly recent (<5 years old) Sitecom model.

I'll try to set a static IP at router level on the Sitecom. The online Davolink manual says to do it on the device itself. So I might end up with just one primitive static IP setting.

Once I get that to work, I have to figure out how to make the Pi autoconnect to the nearest known network instead of attempting to connect to the first one in the list (which it does now).
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on April 21, 2015, 10:44:56 pm
The links I gave above show you how to set priority as to which will connect first.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Cue Zephyr on April 22, 2015, 05:49:41 pm
AV,
Thanks. I've consulted that topic before. Turns out the "disabled" attribute was set for some reason.
After adding netmask and gateway IPs, it seems to autoconnect which i tested with a few wlan0 re-initializations.
I might however still attempt to hack the Davolink and swap it out for the NetGear just for the heck of it. :P


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on April 22, 2015, 05:56:37 pm
If you are switching out a router that your ISP 'controls' be sure you can register the new MAC address with them. Also, a lot of times, they will tell you what to get or may even give you a more modern router just for asking.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Cue Zephyr on April 22, 2015, 08:57:53 pm
I think the credentials are there to lock you into using that router. The 'hack' that I found is actually quite a hack; it requires hard-resetting the router and re-installing firmware. Whilst doing that you have to monitor through FTP to intercept a file that is only momentarily available, which contains the credentials that can be plugged into a different router.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on April 22, 2015, 09:23:38 pm
Seems like it would be a lot easier to just have them upgrade the router. If it's that old it probably doesn't even support newer standards they may be using.

Plus if you have to flash it you also run the risk of bricking it... and bricking your new router.

I've almost done that with one I'm using now.... I had to 'catch' the router at just the right time... and I actually got lucky but it's easy to basically render them useless.

Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on April 22, 2015, 09:33:34 pm
I think the credentials are there to lock you into using that router.

It's actually nothing do do with restricting you to their router (although they may be taking advantage of the mechanism to do that).

If it's ADSL then it works in a very similar way to an old-school dial-up modem, using PPP protocol.

The line and the core network equipment is often provided by the local telephone company who resell the capability to various ISPs.

When you connect, the ADSL modem creates a PPP connection with the telephone company's "BRAS" (Broadband Remote Access Server) which uses the domain part of the username in the credentials to work out which ISP to connect you to. The credentials are then used to validate and select your account (e.g. for billing purposes) with the ISP.

This is different from "DOCSIS" Cable modem type service where you connect to a shared access network (shared with your neighbourhood). In that case they use the modem MAC address to tie you to the network. With ADSL there is no MAC address so they have to use PPP credentials.

Cheers,

Keith
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Cue Zephyr on April 22, 2015, 10:39:11 pm
Great stuff Majik, thanks.

I'll see if there's a chance to get a new router. The Davolink is a rented router (from the ISP) and AFAIK you don't need to flash the router that replaces it. Bricking it would be a bit of a tricky reason to ask for a new router though. ;D
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Majik on April 25, 2015, 11:06:33 am
Cue,
I would check with the ISP, as they may be happy to give you the credentials to use with your own router. ADSL service providers normally seem much happier about doing this than Cable Internet providers in my experience.

Cheers,

Keith

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on April 27, 2015, 02:49:36 am
Don't bother if Tele2 is the ISP cue, these xx--xx are about as cooperative as an observant Jewish man being fed a bacon sandwich...
Why don't you just put the netgear behind the davoxx--xx router, turn off the WiFi on the Tele2 junk, and use the netgear as the AP ?
Also, don't brick the Davolink, they'll just send you another one.
Better yet : ditch Tele2 ASAP and switch to either fibre, cable or a better A(or V)DSL provider.

@ Keith : Unfortunately, Tele2 denies their customers access to the login data for the sole reason of not having to troubleshoot third party hardware, and they're using VERY old Davolink modem/router combo's that are complete and utter xx--xx.
Had cue been with xs4all or KPN he could have used any modem suited to their current standards (ADSL, VDSL, VDSLII), but Tele2 has always been complete and utter xx--xx about this.
Any subscription with them becomes a massive PITA at some point, and their customer service is less helpfull than throwing a rotting kiwi at a brick wall...
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Cue Zephyr on April 30, 2015, 12:14:52 am
The other network is from Telfort and using the Sitecom router which looks like Star Trek next to the Davolink  in terms of router control and GUI interface.

It seems to run fine behind the Davolink now, albeit a little bit slow. There should be 40 down/up conneciton there soon and I'll try to get it to work on LAN as well.

Right now I successfully installed WordPress without too much hassle so I can freely muck around with it and learn how to use it.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on April 30, 2015, 07:02:26 am
Well, I'll be away from the forums for the next few weeks, so if you need any help with the Wordpress, hit me up via email or PM.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: bradt on September 08, 2015, 05:34:38 pm
I'd be careful with those modules bradt, they are capable of outputting a rather disturbingly strong signal, and unpredictably so...

I now see what you mean about the ESP8266. I plugged it in today to try out a few things. On startup the gpios all went high, and everything in the house lost wifi. Don't know how far reaching that was, or if it even affected any other networks (may have just flooded my router somehow).

This was with the original ESP-01. I have a different model I am going to drop in the prototype to try, but it looks like these may not be the right fit for the home automation mesh I was going to build.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on September 09, 2015, 04:46:15 am
Imagine what happens in a more amplified setting, with external antennas and one of the more 'heavyweight' modules they make...
When i said i ended up jamming radio coms in a 1 mile radius, i was not kidding.
Hence why the prototype i made ended up with the police, they could easily trace the signal back to it's original... there was no mistaking the source  :-[
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: LievenDV on September 14, 2015, 10:08:12 am
Hence why the prototype i made ended up with the police, they could easily trace the signal back to it's original... there was no mistaking the source  :-[

darn, you lost your gear? :/

I had an idea and I wonder if this stuff could tackle it.

I'd like to have some kind of video streaming at home.

the gear present:
-a desktop pc, win 8.1, conencted with utp to router
-a samsung tablet running android (my wife's)
-an iPhone 5 (mine..my employers actually..I wouldn't buy one myself ;))
-a TV with hdmi but nog a smart tv. It supports USB for a built in media player though.
-an external HD

what I would like to achieve is that, with a minimum of devices running, watch media on the iphone and tablet. The computer would be used to 'acquire' the media in the fom of physical files. So no streaming services like netflix etc. I would transfer them, over network, to an SD card or something, plugged in the Pi. (that would eliminate the external HD, as it needs to be plugged in all the time and I don't want to wear out my drive I use for backups).
Ideal would be that, for example, I drop put stuff like our family video's to de storage of the Pi from my pc as a network drive or something and that from there on, my wife doesn't need my assistance to watch them on het tablet or on the tv. (she will be needing an app of some sorts I suppose)
as we have a traing bike upstairs, we would like to watch stuff there as well while we excercise. I'll be watching stuff on my iPhone then.

What would I need and how would it work for the mobile devices? (which apps etc)

Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on September 14, 2015, 02:55:56 pm
Lieven, I have been building the same thing and Dan has helped me out. I can tell you a few things...


This is the short story.

Main Family TV = RiPi 2 w/Openelec-KODI
http://openelec.tv/get-openelec
--- notice builds for every OS
-------- this means you can install it on all your devices and stream from local or far.

Now what I figured out about the same time Dan was telling what I needed, and he told me the same thing.... was.... KODI is a kind of a bare bones media center and due to copyright and such, you need to add 3rd party "addons".... of which there are a gazillion.....
I highly recommend you watch/do this... just as a basis to get started....
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8Fgc5IpH30

Hard drives.... you are going to want a big drive to store stuff on... just no two ways about it... music, vids, pictures, docs, everything you want your devices to access 'at hand'... honestly I would get 2 drives... one live and one a copy.

Now my router has some USB ports so I can connect a drive there and share it. It can be shared via UPnP Universal Plug n Play...  So your devices can see it. Like VLC player and other such media playing progs on your devices. There is an issue with VLC and Win10 just so you know.

Ok, now let's say your router has no usb. Dan turned me on to DietPi and you can share your stuff on it. Again though... and I didn't catch on to this right away... it has to have a USB hard drive connected to install correctly and also serve up all the files. The good news is it will run on one of the older Pi B, B+.. It can assist in "aguiring" etc.. ... I have not got to that yet, as I branched off to my router for some of those duties. http://dietpi.net/ .. you will need to get Dan to get you squared away on that as I am not real clear yet just how that all works... plus just being Linux is a stumbling block for me... I still don;t take to it easily.

Due to the nature of how all this streaming stuff works.. some of it requires you subscribe to services and of course some is just out there free and some is copyright protected but randomly available. All that is mixed all together within the 'addons" for KODI... so many may wish to use a VPN service.

GMAIL does not play well with VPN services. It thinks you are in another region trying to log in and blocks you until you prove it's really you. Just a heads up on that. VPNs seem to use ip4 but not ip6 such as this one.... although they are supposed to have ip6 next year. https://nordvpn.com/

Dan has a link to a good article on VPNs which I don;t have handy.

Finally you will probably want a cloud backup for your devices once you get all this mess configured. If you don't have a Dropbox account, get one BUT... have Dan send you an invite and both you and he will get an extra 250 to 500 Mb... I could give you one, but get it from Dan so he can bump his up as I am going to be purchasing a 1T upgrade for something else I have going and somehow I signed up to a new account and it's up to almost 6GB now and neither Dan nor I know exactly how that happened... When you sing up though... go through the little tour and deal they present and when finished they will bump your space up.

so in review

Internet
---- Main TV = fast Pi + access to local storage
--------- oh, you will probably need these too...
--------------- http://www.amazon.com/FLIRC-FL-09028-Universal-Receiver-Components/dp/B00BB0ETW8
--------------- http://www.amazon.com/Edimax-EW-7811Un-150Mbps-Raspberry-Supports/dp/B003MTTJOY/ref=sr_1_1?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1442238318&sr=1-1&keywords=edimax+wifi
You don't need the FLIRC on them all, just your main TV, the WiFi dongle as needed ( if not wired ).

---- Devices = KODI or some media player to access local home storage
---- Pi = stroage share, acquire, other
--------- Cloud storage for at least Pi backups
------------- Some form of backup for everything

So that's the general layout / flow... but it can be tweaked, streamlined in many ways...
Oh,, and you may want a Pi Radio box and Dan has that info as well... I haven't got to that yet either.


So far I've got
Music Share
KODI and VLC on all my devices and can play all my music on any device
One main KODI install on a Pi2.. have FLIRC but need to plug it in and configure

So Desktop - W7, Laptop W10, Tablet Android for Nook HD+
1 Music Share local
--- next is to connect a USB hub to that port so I can share more drives. then use the second USB port for a network printer ( just found out I can do that hub deal )

I have 2 older Pis left for radio, dietPi duties, etc... so still a ways to go.
Hope that gives you a sort of big picture over view as it's fresh in my mind as I just did it in the last week or so. Dan with have to get you detail stuff.

It's beginning to make sense to me now that I've gotten this far.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on September 14, 2015, 04:51:31 pm
I'd suggest a Raspberry Pi 2, with DietPi installed, connect a decent size harddrive, and share files by installing SAMBA on DietPi (it will install just about anything for you, just choose a software package during setup and you're basically done), and you could add an Owncloud install so you could drop files to the system from cellphones as well.
DietPi also does MiniDLNA, so you could stream to any device that supports DLNA/UPnP.
If you want specifics in Dutch, give me a shout on Steam  ;)
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Cue Zephyr on September 14, 2015, 11:23:41 pm
I recently had my mom purchase an RPi 2 which is now running OpenELEC and connected to the TV. I'm not even half aware of what I can make it do. Primariy goal is getting it to play movies and/or series but I've got other things on my mind so I never really got to sit down and figure it out.

I found the YouTube application to be slightly awkward as well (lack of autoplay and can't figure out how to log in). ::)
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on September 15, 2015, 10:55:23 pm
If you need help, you know where to find me...
Hell, i can probably talk you through how to set things up on skype even  ;)
Also, cue, FliRC dongle (https://flirc.tv/).
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on September 16, 2015, 04:29:06 am
Take Dan up on the Skype offer.

This is one subject where you can whizz in the wind for a long time on your own.

If you see it happen and then do some research and then think ... ok... what's the big picture... it will likely snap in place for you.

There are some things you just need to have someone sit you down and show you the basic deal. Then you can go out into the forest and forage for yourself.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: bradt on November 30, 2015, 05:23:00 am
Digging up an old topic here, but have you guys seen the Raspberry Pi Zero? Pretty sweet, and selling for about $5. Hopefully they can get more of them out soon.

https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-zero/

A pretty decent video of it as well.




Now, to find a compatible micro usb wifi dongle.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Fox Cunning on November 30, 2015, 09:40:22 am
Digging up an old topic here, but have you guys seen the Raspberry Pi Zero? Pretty sweet, and selling for about $5. Hopefully they can get more of them out soon.

https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-zero/

A pretty decent video of it as well.


Now, to find a compatible micro usb wifi dongle.
Sold out everywhere in the UK :'(
I wanted to use one as a controller for my AKAI keyboard and drum pad.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on November 30, 2015, 03:04:07 pm
More like sold out everywhere, UK, Belgium, Germany, the Netherlands...
Not a single RPi zero in sight  >:(
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: bradt on November 30, 2015, 03:12:55 pm
Yeah, I believe they said they sold something in the neighborhood of 20,000 units in the first 24 hours. There should be more coming out soon enough though.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on December 01, 2015, 04:42:30 pm
So now the case costs more than the computer!

I don't understand how they can make that thing for $5 much less sell it for that.

It doesn't even show as being a stock item over here from two big national resellers.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on December 01, 2015, 04:43:50 pm
Sold out everywhere in the UK :'(
I wanted to use one as a controller for my AKAI keyboard and drum pad.

How would that work?
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: bradt on December 01, 2015, 05:28:36 pm
I don't understand how they can make that thing for $5 much less sell it for that.

It doesn't even show as being a stock item over here from two big national resellers.

They removed a lot from it (ethernet port, zif sockets, soldered headers, USB port, etc), and lowered the cpu specs from the Pi2. But yeah $5 is cheap.

I believe this first run was only at microcenter and Adafruit in The US. I've only ever bought stuff like this through Amazon, Adafruit, or some of the other specialty electronics retailers online. Where do you generally get them?
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on December 01, 2015, 05:42:32 pm
Normally I will just see who has best price... Amazon, eBay, .. but if I need other parts or what have you, I will buy from..

MCM Electronics
Allied Electronics
Newark Electronics

It just all depends if there is a sale, shipping, combine with other stuff, etc. Like I might pay more for it but save on something else and shipping. You know a transformer or FX parts and things. Transformers are usually cheaper at the parts suppliers or you can get a better transformer.




Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Fox Cunning on December 02, 2015, 12:43:02 am
How would that work?
Presuming it can run the same real-time Linux kernel as the bigger Raspberry Pi, I would pre-configure Fluidsynth and the Jack daemon with "aconnect" using a startup script, so that the input from the keyboard/drum pad goes to the output of Fluidsynth.

If I decide I don't want a display I would then use the GPIO headers with momentary switches to do things like change bank/program, adjust volume and so on. I would have to write my own "driver" for that, but it's fairly easy.

It would need a small, low power amp and speakers (which I already have) to be complete.

At the moment I use a 10 years old 10" laptop to control my LPK25 and LPD8 ;D
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on December 02, 2015, 02:04:57 am
Ok, I see... I was thinking of controller in the other direction.

As in LPK25 as controller.. .so that would make the Pi the host for the soft synth.

Or do you mean the Pi is going to be some sort of device between the LPK25 and an existing computer? Like a midi interface of some sort?

Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on December 02, 2015, 02:56:07 am
So now the case costs more than the computer!

I don't understand how they can make that thing for $5 much less sell it for that.

It doesn't even show as being a stock item over here from two big national resellers.

Only selling through RS and Adafruit in the U.S. as of now.
More retailers to follow ASAP, from what i read.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Fox Cunning on December 02, 2015, 09:09:33 am
This:
As in LPK25 as controller.. .so that would make the Pi the host for the soft synth.
You're right: technically the LPK25 is a MIDI controller (and nothing else); the Pi would provide the synth, sound fonts, effects, and so on. No (other) computers needed.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: bradt on January 05, 2016, 05:38:42 pm
Adafruit has Pi Zeros in stock, but act fast. In the time it took me to order they sold 35 of the 70 listed.

https://www.adafruit.com/product/2885
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: bradt on January 05, 2016, 05:47:22 pm
Aaaaand they're all gone again. Took 20 minutes to sell them from the time they were listed. wow!

They are still showing the budget packs in stock though: https://www.adafruit.com/products/2817
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on March 01, 2016, 01:52:00 am
R-Pi V3 $35

50-60% over R-Pi 2, 10X R-Pi 1

https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspberry-pi-3-on-sale/
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on March 09, 2016, 06:13:50 pm
Yeah, the increase in performance (partially due to the 64 bit architecture) is rather interesting.
The amount of RAM staid the same though, which i don't quite get, since manufacturers usually double the RAM when switching to a 64 bit chipset and architecture.
The onboard Wi-Fi and Bluetooth do make this an excellent platform for IoT applications though, like my daughter's automated blogging birdfeeder project.
Once mine comes in i'll benchmark it against my RPi2 webserver.
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: TB-AV on March 10, 2016, 12:41:24 am
It wouldn't surprise me to see one with some more memory. As it sits, the wi-fi and BT really make the cost like what? $20.. even $15 for the PC. With shipping you will pay $10-$20 for external wifi and BT
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: bradt on May 20, 2016, 10:57:28 pm
Pi Zero got an update recently. Now for the same low price of $5, the board comes with a camera connection.
https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/zero-grows-camera-connector/
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Dan Graves on May 25, 2016, 11:46:10 am
Pi Zero got an update recently. Now for the same low price of $5, the board comes with a camera connection.
https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/zero-grows-camera-connector/

Finally, now i can replace my daughter's birdfeeder project RPi A with an RPi 0, which means we can use the larger birdhouse that she's  been wanting to use for ages  :D
Title: Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
Post by: Cue Zephyr on June 20, 2016, 01:08:01 am
I want to try RetroPi for a bit. Can anybody recommend it - or not?