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Site Lesson Specific Questions => Practice Time (PC) => Topic started by: Indigo on November 12, 2012, 01:12:30 pm

Title: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: Indigo on November 12, 2012, 01:12:30 pm
Lesson Link: http://justinguitar.com/en/PC-102-DecideWhatToPractice.php


Questions...
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: brj on November 21, 2012, 01:08:01 pm
I saw the two videos, pc-101 and pc-102. It was very interesting. But I am in need of some guidence.
My long term goal (3 years) is to create a Christian instrumental band. My medium term goal (1 year) is to play lead in our local praise and worship group.
What I need:
1) Technique. (Hammer on, pull off, slide ext)
2) improvisation
3) music theory
4) music reading
5) Transcribing
Am I on the right path? If not, please point mein the right direction.
Robbie
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: stitch101 on November 21, 2012, 05:08:27 pm
Everything your need is on Justin's web site. Have you taken any of his free lessons?
He has free courses on all 5 point in your list and he also has books and DVDs.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: brj on November 22, 2012, 07:22:28 am
Yes, I have. I am aware of all that is availible. But I need to know if I am on the right path.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: stitch101 on November 22, 2012, 04:56:56 pm
How long have you been playing? If you have just started your goal of playing lead for your worship
group might be a little lofty. It can be done if you have lots of practice time and the songs the group
play are simple.

If you already have a good grasp of the guitar and work on your list it is very possible you can hit your
targets. Reading music is a plus but not necessary to hit your targets. So if you find it hard to learn/practice
every thing on your or don't have enough time you can spend less time on Reading Music and more time
on Transcribing  and Technique.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: bradt on November 23, 2012, 06:37:58 am
I haven't seen the video as t won't load for me. Looking at the list you have though, it looks a little vague.

Look at #1. if you break that down you still have rhythm, finger strength, finger independence, stretching exercises, picking technique, and loads of other stuff.

I think you are off to a good start by listing the skills you want, but you still need to go a step further and isolate how you can practice each of the elements involved in those skills.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: brj on November 26, 2012, 03:27:21 pm
Thanks guyss. I have been playing on and of for about 20 years, but took the electric up on a serious level about 2 years ago. I am planning to look for a decent tutor early 2013.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: CambaNation on November 27, 2012, 03:15:30 pm
Here's a question I've had on my mind for a while. My music taste is extremely varied. I enjoy many genre's that I'd like to become competent in. For example, I really enjoy jazz guitar like Django Reinhardt and Wes Montgomery. On the other hand, I'm a big blues and blues rock fanatic. I love all the 3 kings, Hendrix, SRV, Eddie Van Halen and all the british blues rock guys like Clapton and Jimmy Page and Brian May. Lately though, I've been listening a lot to more technical players like Ritchie Blackmore, Jeff Beck, Guthrie Govan and Eric Johnson.

Though I practice a lot, I feel like my practice regiment lacks focus. Should I separate my practice schedule where I focus on a different music genre each day while still trying to improve my technique. Or should I stick for a while to one genre, say jazz, until I become competent enough and then move on to the other genre's I like?

I´d appreciate any feedback on this!

Cheers
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: stitch101 on November 27, 2012, 05:17:52 pm
All the genres of music you have mentioned have the same foundation. Get the foundation down and
you'll find the technical parts easier to learn.

You didn't say how long or at what stage you play at. If your a beginner start with Justin's beginner
course if you are further along get your blues scales, chords and riffs under your fingers.
A little more info about your playing would help.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: CambaNation on November 27, 2012, 05:52:39 pm
Hello stitch101. Sorry about that. My guitar bio so far  ;)

I have been playing regularly for 4 years with no fix practice schedule. In the beginning I learned my basic chords (majors, minors, 7th extensions, inversions), bought Justin's Practical Music Theory I and II, learned the blues scale, major scale, and worked regularly on my hammer ons and pull offs. I had an obsession with David Gilmour during my first 2 years of playing so I had plenty of practice with bends.

Then I got all into Hendrix. Learned the rhythm guitar parts on at least 15 of his songs and plenty of solo work too. I formed a band where I have performed some Hendrix and SRV songs live (most notably Lenny and Voodoo Chile the long version). We play mostly latin-based music, funk, and reggae now, but at home I'm all about playing the genre's I mentioned.

Trying to emulate some more technical players in the last 3 months, I found that my alternate picking technique is severely lacking. I also learned that they use techniques like economy picking and hybrid picking. These are completely new to me, yet I would like to develop them to play along to the music of technical players that I like. However I find practicing these techniques take up most of the time I have to play guitar and end up neglecting other things I would like to learn like a better understanding of jazz, chords, and basically just expanding my guitar repertoire.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: stitch101 on November 27, 2012, 07:01:48 pm
You've covered a lot of ground in four years. That's a good thing
Sounds like you have a good foundation to build on and your falling into the same trap I find myself in
to often. In one of the videos Justin say "The more you know the more you know you don't know."
This is so true. I find myself fixated on something I want to learn and by the end of the week I've gone
full circle and I'm learning something I need to know so I can learn what I want to know.

Watching these videos on Practicing has made me rethink what I practice and how I practice.  It's only
been a couple of week that Justin has started these practice videos and I'm still trying to list the thing
I Need to know so I can play the thinks I Want to. I think that the big hurtle all of us need to get over. Knowing the difference between Need and want

I'm not into Jazz yet so I can't help you with the need to know part but Justin does have a course called
Jazzing up your blues and he has a Jazz course so that might be a good place to start.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: CambaNation on November 27, 2012, 10:41:56 pm
It's only been a couple of week that Justin has started these practice videos and I'm still trying to list the thing I Need to know so I can play the thinks I Want to. I think that the big hurtle all of us need to get over. Knowing the difference between Need and want

Tell me about it! Some of the players I mentioned have an incredible understanding of rhythm and harmony that I think is probably due to their experience playing hundreds of tunes in all the major genres (blues, jazz, R&B, funk, prog rock, classical and more). Then there's the technical side of things that just takes thousand of hours of practice to master. Too bad I have to study for school and work at the same time  :-\ Maybe I can find a way to not leave the house for like a year like clapton did and just breathe and eat music all day long ;D
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: rpreisendanz on December 15, 2012, 12:19:00 am
Question on what to practice.  My Big Goal is to be one of the best songwriter/singers.  I have written a number of songs and recorded them on Studio One and my 8 track. It has been gigantic fun! I want to keep heading in this direction and I have come up with the following mini-goals:

1. Learn all the notes on guitar, well.
2. Study other song writers/singers I like.
3. Practice vocals.
4. Listen to as many other songs I can.
5. Do the one hour practice as recommended by Justin.

Any suggestions and/or affirmations would be appreciated.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: MFguitar on January 13, 2013, 03:50:48 pm
Hi Justin,

my first post here. I have been playing for about one and half year. I did your beginner course but i didn't set any goal.... I just jump from one thing to other but i see no progress. Nothing is different except i can play scales better but that is not what i like to do.. That was big mistake. I love Rolling Stones and they were the reason that i bought guitar... Now i have a goal to play 10 Rolling Stones songs and later all 50 that are on GRRR! album.
First ten would be -

1.Angie
2.Paint it black
3.Wild Horses
4. Satisfaction
5. Start me up
6. Beast of burden
7. Fool to cry
8.Brown sugar
9. Sympathy for the devil
10. Ruby tuesday

What would you suggest to practice or which lessons should i take from your website? I really struggle and don't know what to do to achieve my goal.

Thanks for help
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: mouser9169 on January 13, 2013, 11:41:31 pm
Do want to play rhythm, lead, or both?

In any case, find out what techniques the Stones used - practice those chords (the way they played them) and the chord changes. Then, if you want to learn their lead - study their riffs (see my sig). After a while, it should start to come together for you.

Pick a song to start with and learn it completely - rhythm and lead. Then move to another, and another. Once you've gotten a few under your belt the rest should come easier.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: shadowscott007 on January 17, 2013, 11:59:45 pm
So I finally figured this one out.  I had a hard time here.  I really didn't know what I want to do.  Now I do.  Had to think hard.

What do I want to do?  Well I want to play with other people.  I would like to play in front of people again.  I don't have the vocal.chops to do the acoustic vocal open mike night.  So...

I think I need to be able to learn songs fast.  So...

I can pick up things fast jamming or at the possible genesis of a new band.  That is how the first jam session I went to at a church went.  I did not burst into flame as I feared might happen.  All kinda modern pop rock worship music.  They had cheat sheets with lyric with changes written over it.  Three acoustic three electric and bass plus me.  Lots of cool progressions.  All songs i've never heard before.  I got invited back and I.caught on to some of the tunes pretty fast... a couple I just didn't feel and I'd miss changes sometimes so I played less.

I want to handle that situation better.  So...

1 - Put on a CD I like or make one.  Start it.  As it plays find tonal center, find major or minor, jam pentatonic, find the right two notes to add, play in relevent diatonic scale, probaby minor (add 2 and b6) or major (add 4 and 7) but could be any mode.  Dorian - add 2 and 6 - to pent minor.  Lydian - add #4 and 7 to pent major.  Unless it's bluesy or blues based... then well all that other crap might not matter.

Jam.

Work out easy riffs and rhythms...

2 - Buy one of Justin's set of jam tracks.  Shopping now.  Thinking PR-022 really useful play along tracks.  Get that and do the exact same thing as above.

My practice will be jamming through a set or two of songs picking them up as I go.  Some will pick up easy some will pick up hard.

Shadow

Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: Nicolás Delgado on January 20, 2013, 12:23:48 am
Hi, today I made a practice routine but I don't know if it's the right one for me.

The routine that I created is:

*Technique: (20 Min)
   - Finger gym -->5 Min
   - Minimum movement --> 10 Min
   - Scale Picking --> 5 Min

*Knowledge: (35 Min)
   - Theory --> 20 Min
   - Notes on the guitar --> 5 Min
   - Scales --> 10 Min

*Transcribing: (1 Hr)
   - Chords --> 15 Min
   - Plucking --> 15 Min
   - Fingerstyle --> 30 Min

*Repertoire: (30 Min)
   - BBQ --> 15 Min
   - Fingerstyle --> 15 Min

*Improvisation: (20 Min)
   - Scales --> 10 Min
   - Melodic percussive fingerstyle --> 10 Min

My long term goal (5 years) is to have a youtube channel with at least 10 songs created by me, and my short term goal (1 Year) is to at least create 1 song. But the problem is that I want to create progressive fingerstyle songs (Candy rat).
Am I on the right path or I need to change somethings?

Thanks
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: Drubbing on January 20, 2013, 12:48:10 am
I think you should build your practice schedule around your 1 year goal. Then break that down to the first 6 months.

What you put in your practice schedule is going to change, depending on how you progress. Not sure anyone else can tell you what should go in it.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: GuitarGirl2013 on January 30, 2013, 02:21:19 pm
How do I know what my goal should be?
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: Cal on January 31, 2013, 06:25:55 am
How do I know what my goal should be?
Go to PC-101 • Set Goals (http://justinguitar.com/en/PC-101-SetGoals.php).  ;)
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: HHT20 on May 28, 2013, 06:43:47 pm
is it advisable to practice two genres in the same practice schedule? for example I am learning the blues. but i also would like to learn jazz. so do i first finish all the lessons on the blues and then move to jazz or can i do it simultaneously?
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: justinguitar on May 28, 2013, 07:23:03 pm
I'd work on your blues first hht, cos jazz is a load harder and will require many of the techniques you'll learn in the blues...  you'll enjoy the jazz up your blues series if you are ready for that!! :)
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: Nozzer on July 01, 2013, 11:38:35 pm
Basically want to be able to do AC/DC - pref Angus, with a bit of Malcolm thrown in.
I guess I am not the first. Anybody got a practice routine?
have You Shook Me All night Long ok-ish now, but much more to attend to to get the Back In Black album done, then the earlier stuff. Simple ain't easy.

I've been going for lessons for c 1 Year now, but am struggling to put time in to practice. Plus tutor not that into AC/DC - except for Thunderstruck - not one of my favs. Prefer Powerage stuff.

Tutor thinks I need work on stopping the notes from clashing - muting strings that are not being played during solos etc. Guess he is right. Is there specific lesson on this/practice routine to help?

Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: Drubbing on July 02, 2013, 12:42:28 am
 I think you've just got to break down to the things that AC/DC tend to rely on. I'm learning a number of their tunes and while many of the chords are simple, they're often changes really quickly, and/or a little different to the standard ones - they often drop a note off here and there. This seems to be important to get the sorts of sounds they play. But that requires practice to learn these alterations and get your speed up. I've been plugging away at the intro to back in black for months; it's not simple to do it fast, rhythmically and clean every single time.

Then there's rhythm. Highway to hell is all on the rhythm of the chords, and muting them out to quick stops. THe only way to practice this is practice strumming chords and muting, and making up your own rhythms, so that you get used to doing it.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: shadowscott007 on July 04, 2013, 01:23:11 am
Malcom is the cake, Angus is the icing.  Angus is awesome great lead player love him.  But Malcom supplies the groove and an awesome groove at that.  Malcom makes Angus better.  Learn all the parts.

Shado
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: Lukas on July 04, 2013, 11:24:06 am

My long term goal (5 years) is to have a youtube channel with at least 10 songs created by me, and my short term goal (1 Year) is to at least create 1 song. But the problem is that I want to create progressive fingerstyle songs (Candy rat).
Am I on the right path or I need to change somethings?

Thanks

If you want to be able to play fingerstyle, learn by playing simple fingerstyle tunes. All the things you have in your schedule are great, but I doubt that you would be able to play fingerstyle in one year based on your schedule.

You have a clear goal - that's great. Now you have to make your practice routine lead you toward that goal.

A short while ago I wrote an article about this same topic, check it out if you like.
http://theaspiringguitarist.net/guitar-practice

Hope that helps
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: chris goss on October 13, 2013, 07:48:00 pm
Justin,

I'm an adult student.  Been playing about 2 years.  I pretty much still suck.  My goals are:

1.  To play fun BBQ songs for my family and friends.
2.  To play classic rock cover songs just for fun and maybe play with some other musicians.
3.  To play finger style guitar by myself....kind of be a one man band...

What lessons / courses should I be taking in order to reach these goals.  So far I'm in the beginner course around stage 3.  I have the song book and just ordered the RUST DVD. 

I'm all ears.

Thanks,

Chris
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: Drubbing on October 14, 2013, 12:53:47 am
All of them. Justin's course isn't designed as a pix n mix approach.

Start at the beginners course, if you've got basic strumming skills and open chords, it own't take that long. All the works been done for you. Follow it, and learn as many songs as time allows.

The songbook is a very good learning tool, and regardless of what lesson stage you're at, you might find your playing skills are ahead or behind of the stage you're on.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: misterg on October 14, 2013, 01:48:20 am
Hi Chris,

My understanding is that while the principles in this lesson are general, it is aimed mainly at people who are at a 'player' level, rather than those still following the Beginner / Intermediate courses (like you and me! :) - I'm at about level 3-4 Intermediate).

I think that everything is taken care of for us in the Beginner / Intermediate courses through the practice routines recommended at each stage of the courses. Just stick to those. Finishing the BC will bring you close to your goals IMHO, certainly for the BBQ songs, then you might want to move on to the Intermediate & Folk fingerstyle modules and/or the Solo Blues songs for example.

I am also an 'adult student'  (:o) who has tried to teach himself for years, and I would say that the BC is excellent - it brings results better than everything else I've ever found. Stick with it, and do everything Justin says (even the boring stuff!), and you will be amazed by your progress.

Andy
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: chris goss on October 14, 2013, 12:17:00 pm
Thanks for the great advice.  I will stick with my plan of following the basic and intermediate courses.  After that I will go to the fingerstyle course while I continue to improve my song list.  Thanks again!

Chris
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: Matek on October 17, 2013, 04:23:32 pm
As a beginner for 5 years!!
I think the biggest problem is exactly what is being discussed here.
I have just watched the 1st two videos of the "what to practice" series and it is great if you are an intermediate or above guitarist, and actually know what you need to learn to progress and achieve your goals.
As a beginner, you DON'T know these things. That is why I just bought the beginner pack.
I have tried to learn by myself and struggled, I got a teacher who was a great guitarist but would ask "what do you want to learn today?" at the start of the lesson. If I knew what I should learn, I wouldn't have paid him, and learnt from the internet for free.
I had one great teacher who had a structured lesson plan for his students. I progressed more in 3 months than the previous 3 years. Unfortunately I changed jobs an work evenings now and he can only teach in the evenings so I had to stop.

Basically I think that a beginner/early intermediate guitarist needs to be asked what his/her goals are and TOLD what to do to achieve them.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: misterg on October 17, 2013, 05:04:59 pm
Basically I think that a beginner/early intermediate guitarist needs to be asked what his/her goals are and TOLD what to do to achieve them.

Assuming that the overall goal is to learn to play the guitar, that's all you need to worry about to start with. IMHO detailed goals don't matter too much for the Beginner & Intermediate Foundation module - Pretty much everyone will have to go through these courses and the practice routines are set at every stage - just need to work through the courses and follow the recipe.

To my mind, anyway, detailed goal setting only becomes relevant at/after this stage where the range of possibilities is huge. If there are Intermediate Style modules relevant to those goals (Folk Fingerstyle / Blues / etc.) then again, the practice routines are laid out.

Just my 0.02p
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: mumbles on October 17, 2013, 08:26:40 pm
A lot of guitarists don't seem to appreciate rhythm guitar playing. Music consists of Melody, Harmony and Rhythm. What is most usually referred to as rhythm is in fact two thirds of that equation because the chords that make up most rhythm guitar parts are also the harmonic content. Rhythm guitar can (in the form of arpeggios) also involve melody.

Van Halen and Hendrix are/were excellent rhythm players and have/had a wide ranging knowledge of chords that enabled them to shape songs.

Don't underestimate the value of knowing chords and the different ways to play them.

My own practice regime is split into Rhythm/Repertoire/Theory/Harmony/Melody. The future repertoire tends to dictate what aspect of the others will be worked on.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: Simpinator on March 30, 2014, 06:05:00 pm
My goal i to become a instrumental Rock guitarist like Steve Vai/Joe Satriani. But with My own unic voice.

So im not sure really what to practice ?

My practice shedule looks like this:

Teknik : scale up and down, sweeping shape, sequnce picking, and a new sweeping shape.( 5min per exercice)

Learn new: guitar homework (10 min), ensemble in My school (10 min) ( total 20 min )

Transcribe: 20 min ex Steve Vai Songs or training My ears with intervall and rythmic imitations

Repouta: Learning songs, ensemble in school or Steve Vai songs ( 20 min )

Jamming: ( 20 min backingtracks, own musik or GarageBand and play rythm patterns )

Teknik: finger gym 4 min, chord changes 4 min, duraion work out ( rythm exercice )

So what do you guys/girls thinks is it something that miss ? Give me alot off feedback and tips if i should practice something Else or remove something from My practice routine. By the way i have problem with My rythm so maybe i should fokus more on that ?

Please give alot of advice and feedback :) !
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: stitch101 on March 30, 2014, 06:27:01 pm
Without knowing how long you've been playing and what level your at it hard to help you with your
practice routine.

Quote
By the way i have problem with My rythm so maybe i should fokus more on that ?

Without being a solid rhythm player you'll never be a great lead player. Have you ever jammed with one
of those annoying people who think they are great lead players but can't carry a tune in a bucket?
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: Drubbing on March 31, 2014, 01:10:41 am
Learn songs. And rhythm. Lead is just the filler in between what people actually want to hear. Lead is all about what the player wants to hear. As much as Vai tries, they are not songs. I think the only people that go to Vai gigs are other players...
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: Simpinator on April 03, 2014, 05:43:50 pm
Ok thanks for your answers !    ;)

But if i having trouble with My rythm what kind of exercices should i do to improve my rythm then ? And how should i divide my practice shedule ?

I mean i have a litle rythm for kind of easy and medium class.

I have been playing for 3 years and i can play solo pretty good but as you mentioned you need to have a good rythm also.

Im in school so i don't have all the time to practice either so i don't really know how i should divide it ?  :-\
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: stitch101 on April 03, 2014, 06:15:20 pm
Sound like your already pasted the Beginner Course. Try the Intermediate Course.
There is Rhythm lesson in every stage. Do the whole course even the stuff you already know.

http://justinguitar.com/en/IM-000-IntermediateMethod.php
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: Simpinator on April 05, 2014, 12:00:19 am
Ok i will finnish the intermediate course and practice evrything even the things i all reade know !

But how long should i stay on each stage if i know most of the things there? :)

Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: Borodog on April 05, 2014, 12:13:46 am
You just need to make sure you haven't skipped anything and that you are actually up to snuff on the stuff you think you already know. Be honest with yourself. In fact, record yourself and listen back to what you sound like. Don't believe your ears while you are playing; believe them while you are listening.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: stitch101 on April 05, 2014, 01:51:35 am
Ok i will finnish the intermediate course and practice evrything even the things i all reade know !

But how long should i stay on each stage if i know most of the things there? :)

It never hurts to revisit things you know. You can pick up stuff you missed and learn stuff you didn't
know existed.
You only need to stay with the things you don't know. If you already have one thing down pat you
don't need to redo it but if it's new or you not up to snuff practice until it clean.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: bradt on April 05, 2014, 01:55:46 am
Also, bear in mind that knowing how to do something, and being able to do it are two very different things. Just knowing how isn't enough. I know how to play cricket, but that doen't mean you'd want me on your team.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: stitch101 on April 05, 2014, 02:13:48 am
Thumbs up on that one Brad.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: goflvhxj963 on July 20, 2014, 01:24:55 am
Hey guys just registered to this forum. I played guitar for 1 year and a half or so and I pretty got the basic technique down and good enough finger movement to play fast pieces. The things is that I never thought about the music theory that I just started on the beginner course. I'm having a little trouble with recognizing the chords by ear that it's taking me sometime to move on to the next phase. I've always been bad at memorizing stuff but I'm not sure if it's relevant to my inability to how the chords sound.

Let's get to the main point:
I actually want to make my own original song consisting of guitar, bass, and drum and decided to study music theory using justin's courses. But the problem is that I just have no idea how to set up a schedule for me to go about achieving this goal.

Can anyone give me some advices?
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: Drubbing on July 20, 2014, 02:10:15 am
Justin course is basic music theory. I'd suggest you need far more playing experience and theory background before you can work towards your goal. Knowing chords by ear and transcribing songs from ear, would be a good place to start.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: goflvhxj963 on July 20, 2014, 02:30:41 am
Yeah but what I want to know is the detail. Like I heard that when you play/compose song, you need to find out what key the song is going to be in.

1. How do we find out what key the song is in?
2. How do we know which notes/chords we can use so that it won't sound wrong if I use the wrong ones?
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: Drubbing on July 20, 2014, 02:36:09 am
If you don't know the answers to that question, you're not ready to write songs and play other instruments to them.

Keys chosen often depend on the vocals. Some people change the key of a given song they're learning to suit their ability to sing it.

Chord progressions are groups of chords that work well together. You need to know how and why, as that's part of what makes music work.

This is why you need to understand theory. Buy Justin's Practical theory book and work from there.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: goflvhxj963 on July 20, 2014, 02:51:59 am
I'll definitely check out Justin's theory book. I would like to ask one last question.

If the song is in the key of A major and I decided to use the pentatonic scale, I need to use the A major pentatonic scale for the lead part right? My question is

1. Do we have to start from the root A or can we just start somewhere else?
2. Do we have to come back to the root of A at some point while playing or right at the end?
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: mouser9169 on July 20, 2014, 01:52:37 pm
Yeah but what I want to know is the detail. Like I heard that when you play/compose song, you need to find out what key the song is going to be in.

1. How do we find out what key the song is in?
2. How do we know which notes/chords we can use so that it won't sound wrong if I use the wrong ones?

That stuff is too involved to go into in a forum post.

What you're asking about is a different skill set than playing the guitar. Someone could be a great guitar player and not know the first thing about composing, while someone else is a great composer and not be able to play any instrument with any proficiency.

You need to get a good book (or two) on music theory (Justin's may or may not be 'deep' enough for what you want, I haven't seen it - but being as the title is 'Practical' music theory, I suspect not). Then get some books and watch/read lessons on songwriting. Once you've done that, you practice like anything else - in this case you practice writing songs. Your first ones will probably be terrible, but keep at it and they'll get better.

Oh, and you also have to know enough about bass and drums to put them into your pieces effectively as well. Doesn't mean you have to be able to physically play them, but you do need to know how they are played. If you're doing all the recording or composing via computer yourself, you need to know how to record and work with the audio software, too.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: goflvhxj963 on July 20, 2014, 07:02:00 pm
Thanks for the reply. But what's with those people who say they don't really know any music theory yet they can play in the band with others? Are they just playing by ear and try out different chords which might sound somewhat good to make a harmony?
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: mouser9169 on July 21, 2014, 12:06:05 am
Thanks for the reply. But what's with those people who say they don't really know any music theory yet they can play in the band with others? Are they just playing by ear and try out different chords which might sound somewhat good to make a harmony?

You've asked two different questions:

PLAYING doesn't require music theory, though knowing it helps.

COMPOSING or arranging requires a pretty deep knowledge of music theory (yes, I know there are composers who aren't theory savvy, but they're the minority).

What you need to do is sit down, take a deep breath, and start at the beginning. If you want to play guitar, start with the beginners course and go through each lesson - some may be review and you'll breeze through, but I've found very useful tidbits tucked away in a lot of his lessons that true beginners probably miss if they never watch them again.

One of the Very Cool(tm) things that Justin's course does is provide actual metrics for you to see when it's time to move on to the next stage. When you can do so many chord changes a minute, and know this or that strumming pattern, or whatever else is in that stage: don't forget the ear training exercises, it's time to move on.

If you can do most of it but are stuck on one or two things, then practice those things like mad until you can do them, then move on.

If you're serious about learning to compose music, you've got to study music theory. You can do this concurrently with your playing, because honestly the two don't have a whole lot to do with each other at the beginning playing level, especially with guitar. Piano/keyboard is less forgiving in this regard.

Get a good, solid book. You can buy the old (2003) edition of Tonal Harmony on Amazon for under twenty bucks used, $45 new (the workbook is more expensive, but still a lot cheaper than the latest edition). That's a steal - the latest edition is over $150 new for just the text, though you can buy it packaged with the workbook at some reasonable prices through 3rd party sellers. In any case I can guarantee music theory hasn't changed that much over the past ten years.

How much of it you use will be up to you and how you choose to compose and arrange your music. There are metal bands that throw long 'suspension' chains in their music like something out of Bach or Hayden. Others just get by with knowing a few chord progressions and scales.

Oh, and learning theory is hard work. There's a LOT more to it than learning chord progressions and scale degrees. Only you can decide if you want to go down this route.

My suggestion is to focus on your playing for now - work especially on your TIMING. Do everything to a metronome, this way when you get the opportunity to play with other people, you'll be able to play IN TIME. Without that, jam sessions quickly become train wrecks.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: Drubbing on July 21, 2014, 01:56:35 am
Thanks for the reply. But what's with those people who say they don't really know any music theory yet they can play in the band with others? Are they just playing by ear and try out different chords which might sound somewhat good to make a harmony?

They know theory. They just learnt its practical applications through playing, not studying. BB King is said never to have studied any theory in his life. He knows blue and jazz back to front and inside out.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: rajvignesh95 on September 15, 2014, 02:49:18 pm
Hey everybody. Im new to playing the guitar.I'm practicing the d major chord and however hard I try it doesn't sound perfect but it sounds okay-ish. Is it okay if I learn another chord without being perfect in this?
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: stitch101 on September 15, 2014, 04:08:44 pm
When you first start very little is going to sound perfect. Also when playing one chord over and over the
groove in your fingers become pretty deep and can mute the strings instead of letting them ring out.
So learning one or two new chord will actually help with the first chord. You can alternate between them
giving the grooves in you fingers time to puff back up and it make practicing more enjoyable.
 
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: rajvignesh95 on September 15, 2014, 04:11:24 pm
Thanks for the help stitch..:-)
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: Devan99 on October 31, 2015, 02:17:14 pm
Hi Justin! what do you recommend learning first, arpeggios or triads?
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: tobyjenner on October 31, 2015, 04:58:53 pm
Devan

Guess it depend what level you're at or at what point you are on Justin's learning path. Triads appear towards the end of the Intermediate foundation course but Arpeggios have their own sub set of lessons.

Checkout the lessons index  8)

http://www.justinguitar.com/en/AA-000-LessonIndex.php
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: JCridford on January 09, 2017, 11:59:25 pm
Hi everyone,

My name's J - I'm new to the forum and have a question about practicing and what to practice. I've been making progress Justin's timer method, for an hour a day, practicing each thing for 10 minutes e.g. scales/arpeggios/techniques etc. But my question is this: With each segment, how many exercises should I be doing? A couple for a minute or two each? More than that, or just one? If so, should I stick with those 1/2/3 exercises every time I focus on that area until I get them up to speed?

Thanks,

J
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: Dr Winterbourne on January 10, 2017, 12:44:19 am
J,

I guess it depends where you want to go. The techniques lessons are not ends in themselves. They are means to a musical end. When doing the original Blues Lead course, I added an extra five minutes for each of the rolling technique, bending technique and vibrato lessons. I picked up rolling pretty quickly, so it only lasted a week or so, but the others, especially bending, needed longer. I did those techniques so I could do the Blues licks. And I learnt the Blues licks so I could rip solos during jams with my mates.

Don't learn a technique so you can do the technique. Practice what you need to get you to be the musician you want to be, and to play the music you want to perform. At times, that will be spending months with the metronome, honing your scales. But know why - so I learn my way around the neck, or so I can really cut sick, speed wise, during that solo in that song, or because I need to increase my left/right coordination so that I can...

I would say, focusing more directly on your question,, as I understand it, that 5 minute slots for the techniques you need to be doing to play the music you want to be able to play is about right. Don't learn scales so that you can play scales fast. That is not music. Learn scales fast so you can nail that solo. And balance it out. If you are doing scales, arpeggios, and 'techniques', don't forget that you should devote equal time to, say 16th note Strumming or fingerstyle, and to theory, and to aural training, and to songs. Always songs.

Learn the techniques that you need to play your repertoire, and that will help make you the musician you want to be.

Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: doggedwon on January 10, 2017, 12:52:32 am
Practice what you need to get you to be the musician you want to be, and to play the music you want to perform.
...
Learn the techniques that you need to play your repertoire, and that will help make you the musician you want to be.

I don't think we hear that enough.  It should be repeated often.

Thank you!
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: JCridford on January 10, 2017, 12:33:40 pm
Thanks for your help everyone :-)
What a warm welcome to the forum. I'll write about myself on the 'welcome' page, but long story short, I'd love to become a music/guitar teacher myself. I've been playing for 6 years, I'm 26 and have always thought about it, but have really started to seriously look at my playing and knowledge in the last 6 months.  If I can get there by 30 I'll be a happy man!

Given that I want to be a teacher, I think I need to take a methodical approach - stick to a few things at a time; master them and move on, becoming back to them for a refresher when I can.

Up until recently I've always been a 'feel' player - my techniques have been okay but not where I'd like them to be, and since starting my practice schedules and working hard, I've seen good results so far.

Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: Dr Winterbourne on January 10, 2017, 02:37:39 pm
I am a teacher of literature and language, and have learnt so much about how to present and sequentially structure courses from this site. If you want to learn to teach, the Beginner's Course on this site is a masterclass in presenting information in a way that really helps, supports, encourages and teaches students. It rewards study.
Title: Re: PC-102 • Decide What To Practice
Post by: JCridford on January 10, 2017, 10:50:43 pm
Thanks for the tip! I will definitely check it out :-)

J