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Site Lesson Specific Questions => Justin's Beginners Guitar Course (BC) => Topic started by: justinguitar on June 03, 2009, 12:38:35 pm

Title: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: justinguitar on June 03, 2009, 12:38:35 pm
Lesson Link: http://justinguitar.com/en/BC-115-1MinuteChanges.php

Questions...
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: AprilGirl12 on January 27, 2011, 09:02:35 pm
I know I'm supposed to get one thing really good before I move on but it's in my nature to like a big challenge so I was wondering do I need 60 chord changes/min before playing one of the songs (let's say Three Little Birds in this case)? Or is it possible to start learning the song at the same time as speeding up chord changes after a certain point? (and if it is, what would that point be, 30? 40? 50?)

Thanks, everyone, for any help and thanks for the great lessons, Justin
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: flyhead on January 27, 2011, 09:34:49 pm
Go for the easy songs too, playing songs is why we practice, and making chord changes while keeping time is something that requires practice in itself. Just don't get lost in trying to do fun things at the expence of others, and keep on working to weed out mistakes and weaknesses in your technique. It's important to remain systematic and self-disciplined when there is no brimstone-breathing mentor from Mendes making demands on you.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: solly on February 20, 2011, 09:55:55 pm
i did 13 on my first attempt. is this normal? am i doing something wrong (other than counting?). I counted every d chord, so it wasn't because of that.

could it be because i play piano, so i have more practice at quick finger movements?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: PattheBunny on February 21, 2011, 05:41:08 am
It's like this -- everyone wants to be precocious, do well early on, and all that.  But eventually we all catch up and then what does it matter how quickly you got started?   I think this about life too.  People who talk about how smart their kids are --one day all the kids will be grown and then it won't matter who talked or walked first.  You know?   

I think you can play a simple song without having sixty changes a minute.  Just play it SLOOOOOOWLY.    And have fun with that too. 
In the words of someone great,  Don't Hurry.  Be Happy....  was that how it goes.......? Well it should. :)
 
Pat

(http://i1091.photobucket.com/albums/i395/Suddenlyitwassummer/tee_slow_bunny_magnet-p1473293219833989217pdm_325.jpg)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: nightey on February 22, 2011, 08:06:32 am
First of all, hello everybody and sorry in advance for my english.

It's seems impossible to reach the target of 60 changes in one minute, I've worked on it for 1 month (A, D, E, Am, Dm, Em, G, C, D7, C7, B7) and If I can say that my minutes changes increase in time, I'm far to achieve this step... frustrating

Someone can confirm with me that 60 is reachable for a beginner ?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: mattywarr on February 22, 2011, 12:33:41 pm
Yes Its possible, I went through the beginners course recently and can confirm it is possible!

How are you counting them?

If your one minute change was A to E then for 60 changes per minute I would count

A to E = 1
E to A = 2
A to E = 3
E to A = 4

Thats when you could to 60 - If you were counting A to E to A as 1, then 30 in a minute is the magic number you need.

I would say,psychologically, its a good idea to start on the changes you find easiest until you hit that magic number, then you'll feel a great sense of relief that it is indeed possible :)

Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Bootstrap on February 22, 2011, 01:37:33 pm
Nightey hang in there dude - 1 month is not a very long time to acquire a new skill. We would all like to become superstars overnight, but the reality is every new skill on the guitar takes a lot of practice.

True some people pick it up faster than others - that happens in any pursuit in life.

Playing guitar is what you want to do, it is what you choose to do, you have a passion for it - why let something you love be a source of frustration - see it as a challenge, celebrate every stp closer to your goal and be proud that when you do achieve it (and you will) that you persisted where countless others gave up.

You can and will do it.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: FwTx on March 01, 2011, 03:15:13 am
i am having loads of trouble getting above 25 or so changes....  i started guitar 9-10 days ago; my fingers tips are sore and i find i still have to watch both my left and right hands most of the time.  i know much more practice is needed

a particular issue i am having on the D chord is, i have to put finger #3 down before 1 or 2.  finger 3 is not stretchy; i stare at it trying to will it over but no luck

any advice or encouragement?  i tend to only practice 10-15 minutes at a burst due to sore finger tips.  i then try and practice 2-3 times in an evening after work

thx
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: ShigenoriM on March 04, 2011, 03:55:29 pm
Lesson Link: http://justinguitar.com/en/BC-115-1MinuteChanges.php

Questions...

I am working on D, A, and E. Been on one week. It does not seems to improve but keeps on making mistakes on forming each chords. if I made the D right, I make mistake on A and so on. Also, my right hand strumming get messed up since E is the only chord that you strum everything. I can not really see the strings as I have my guitar positioned just as Justine has suggested to hold (90 degree flat angle sort of). any suggestion?

Also when do I move on to the next lesson?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Bootstrap on March 04, 2011, 06:08:52 pm
ShigenoriM, don't be too stressed by the strings you strum......

Obviously for control it is best that you only strum 5 strings for A and 4 strings for D but musically it isn't a very big sin if you strum more

A Major chord is made up of the notes A, C#, & E - so if you strum all 6 strings you just get another E - only difference is you get an E as the bass note not an A, but it is still an A chord (they call these inversions).

D Major chord is made up of the notes D, F#, & A - so if you hit 5 strings you still get a D chord as above except you get another A note and it is the bass. If you hit all 6 strings - E is part of the D scale so you end up with a kind of inverted Dmaj9 (minus the 7th - C#) so whilst it is wrong it won't sound awful!

So - go for accuracy but don't stress it too much if you stuff up!

One week is a very short time for learning anything new on the guitar - all new techniques you learn on your journey will take weeks/months to master - get used to it!

As for when to move on - up to you, but not before when you can at least remember all of a lesson (even if you have not yet mastered all of the content) is probably about the right time.

Enjoy the ride Dude :)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: skip on March 11, 2011, 04:39:31 am
one quick question... at what point am I not looking at my fingers to find the chords?... I can do a few but not many
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Bootstrap on March 11, 2011, 06:02:18 am
It will come when it will come - try playing in front of a mirror as an interim step.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: FwTx on March 18, 2011, 10:19:06 pm
i started the guitar one month ago and have struggled getting my chord changes faster.  Here is something i found useful.  Since i had only gotten up to around 25 changes, i set my metronome to 20 and didn't try to change as fast as i could, but rather only change at each count.  once i had that sounding good at 20, i went to 30 and so on

Hopefully this will be useful to some

Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: perfopt on April 01, 2011, 03:59:33 pm
When I change chords I find it easier in most cases to put down my fingers one at a time (the one exception is E-AM where all my finders move together). Is this a bad practice?

Try as I might I am unable to move all three fingers  to corresponding strings simultaneously.

Thanks
Perfopt
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Gandalf on April 01, 2011, 05:38:01 pm
Keep following the course, Justin comes to showing you how to do "Air Changes" in Stage 5 and "Forcing the Changes" in Stage 4.

I would recommend that you keep to the course structure and practice schedules and try not to jump to the next level too soon.

You will get there ;)



Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: perfopt on April 02, 2011, 04:57:27 am
I am not jumping ahead. I am in stage 2 after completing stage 1 to a reasonable level of comfort. I am able to get about 30-40 changes a min for all stage 1 chord changes and play 3 little birds with pauses. My question is

Does it matter that I place my fingers one at a time on the stings? Will that hold me back from improving my chord change speed? Should I consciously try to place all fingers together?

Thanks
Perfopt
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Gandalf on April 02, 2011, 09:03:00 am
Quote
Is this a bad practice?

Sorry, didn't address that question in my answer. No, it is not considered bad practice.

As your muscle memory grows, by doing things repetitively, you will find that the changes will become easier. Like most things in life, when you first start to do them, you have to think about it and then all of a sudden, it becomes automatic.

That is why Justin only addresses starting to use air changes later in the course.

Hope this helps.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: perfopt on April 03, 2011, 09:23:53 am
Keep at it, you will get to higher speeds soon. I noticed that the improvements seem to come in jumps. You may be at 15-20 changes for 2 weeks and suddenly get to 40s in a day. The key for me is to be really focused while practicing and practice regularly (30-40 mins a day).

Best of luck
Perfopt
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: paranoidandroid15 on April 10, 2011, 04:49:34 am
I'm having trouble with changing chords.when i go to a chord fromthe D chord the D chord makes a really annoying sound when i lift off my fingers to change to the nxt chord.why is that?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Bootstrap on April 10, 2011, 12:57:45 pm
PA15 there are a couple of possible reasons....

1) you are not lifting your fingers straight off, but dragging them sideways and you are doing an inadvertent pull-off (a technique where you deliberately make the string sound with the fretting hand)

2) you have not yet formed hard skin on your finger tips and the strings are kind of sticking to your squishy flesh and that is having the same kind of impact as in number 1 above.

In both cases, this will diminish over time.

Stick with it - you will get there.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: meh on April 21, 2011, 01:30:23 am
I'm finding as I'm trying to get faster all I'm doing is making a mess of the chords.  I go from very slow and the chords sounding OK, to speeding up and making a whole heap of buzzing and mute sounds.  Cause I'm trying to go faster I'm not positioning my fingers correctly to get a clean chord and my fingers are touching other strings or I'm not pushing down hard enough.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: perfopt on April 21, 2011, 04:38:19 pm
Keep trying changes at a pace where the fingers at least land correctly even if the strumming sounds off - that is what I think Justin says in the video.

Keep at it - sometimes you will feel like you are stuck and a couple of days later your speed will suddenly go up.

Best of luck
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: StreetDeacon on April 27, 2011, 01:24:39 am
I think I wanna kill the person that invented Dm chord.

So I was on stage 2 and I got to the point to where I was doing good on all the changes cept the ones with Dm.  So I decided to go ahead with stage 3 and add the Dm changes from stage 2.  Well now I'm doing well with all the changes from stage 3, but I'm still weak when it comes to Dm-Am and Dm-A from stage 2.  Seems many people complain about G or C, but I can do those OK. 

I've read all the posts in this thread and it seems I'm not alone.

Oh well.  I guess I'll just keep working at it.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Aky93 on June 15, 2011, 09:52:01 pm
Ok, guys first what i want to say is thanks to Justin, i started learning all im newbie, I have few questions, I'm at lesson 1 minute changes, i had these results: A-E: 11 D-E: 11, D-A: 12 for first time. Now what i wanted to ask, when i change cords i hmm i dont know how to explain, my tone doesnt sound clear, like when i prepair for example D chord, when im trying to do it fast i dont do it good, Justin said in BC-115 that that is normal and this is for finger speed, but from mine point of view that should be important too?

Regards Aleksandar
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Aky93 on June 16, 2011, 08:30:27 pm
And should I stay on this lession utill i have 1 chord change per seccond, or should i practise other lessions? ty
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: perfopt on June 19, 2011, 10:01:59 am
@Aky93 change to the next lesson once you are comfortable with the chords. The rule of thumb I use

-  dont need to look at notes to remember what the chord looks like

- can do about 45-55 changes per minute

Getting to 60 chords per min is a little difficult when you begin. Practicing "Air chords" will help. But even after that it takes a few months of practice. I am in stage 6. I can now do 90% of my chord changes at > 50. But only about 4 chords at 60.


Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Bccairns on July 07, 2011, 12:14:37 pm
Hi guys with the one minute change should I be muting strings from the previous chord...  For example moving from A to D are you muting the 5th string on the change to D?

thanks in advance.

 :-*
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: misterg on July 07, 2011, 06:07:06 pm
Hello & welcome.....

I would say don't worry too much about this to start with - just get the changes fast with the chords sounding reasonable.

Andy
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: alan4573 on August 22, 2011, 10:10:50 pm
Hi Everyone

I picked up a guitar for the first time one week ago today and started the beginners course a couple of days later. I'm in my mid forties so I appreciate the learning curve will be steeper (and probably harder) for me than a youngster :-)

Having worked up to chord changes on chords A, D and E (practising about 1/2 hour per day), I tried my first 1 minute changes tonight and achieved 37, 36 and 37. This surprised me as I didnt expect to get anywhere near that so I am really pleased with my progress so far  ;D  ;D

Now my question - Is it better to keep on with these 3 chords until I can consistently achieve 60 before I move onto adding the next chords (Amin, Dmin and Emin) or should I go for it and keep going back to the 1 minute changes to increase the number.

I am in no particular rush to get through the course, just want to make sure everything I'm learning sticks and becomes second nature.

Thanks

Alan
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Goooner1 on August 23, 2011, 08:02:50 am
If you're already doing 37, I'd say move on to the next section, nothing to stop you still practicing those ones as well though (46 here, only been playing for 4 months, there are quite a few of us "older" newbies on here, so you're not alone ;D)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: MikeG on September 20, 2011, 01:01:11 am
Hi I just started the 1 minute chord changes and I was wondering it is okay to be looking at my fingers to see where to go and after how long should I not be looking at my fingers for the changes? Thanks!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: AndrewBW on September 30, 2011, 03:48:53 am
Hi. Here's one trick that I've found helps me practice the 1 minute changes. Rather than setting my metronome at the speed I'm playing I set it to run faster. So if I can play the changes at 50 bpm, I might set it for 56 bpm.

At first I don't pay attention to the metronome, but as I play through the changes I begin to develop a rhythm after awhile. I think that's because even though I'm not actually playing along with the metronome, that steady click helps me to find a groove. And once I get into that groove I start picking up some speed, trying to match the metronome more closely. So rather than matching it I'm trying to catch it.

Then when it gets to where I can reliably play it a change at a particular speed I push the metronome forward and start trying to catch up to it again.

Hope that's not wholly repetitious of something someone else has posted somewheres - I'm new hear and still exploring Justin's excellent course. But I thought I'd toss that idea out in case it might help someone else.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: PhDJ on November 28, 2011, 09:20:03 am
Just started doing my one minute changes and to my surprise I was able to do more than I expected.

Was just wondering how long it takes for an average student to get to the 60 changes in a minute ?

I know it differs from person to person, but just to have an idea ...
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: 40sumthin on December 01, 2011, 01:19:18 am
I'm finding this to be a great drill and have seen some improvement in the week I've been at it, especially with D-A-D...  I noticed however that I've got a tendency to drag my anchor finger (in this case finger 1) on the third string rather than coming right off it and thus creating that weird squeal/squelch noise.  I'm thinking this is bad form but need confirmation.  Should I worry about it now and consciously make the effort to not drag?

And if anyone knows what the 'technical' term is for that noise, please let me know. ;)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: jacksroadhouse on December 01, 2011, 08:11:03 am
Well, not surprisingly that's called "finger noise" (at least I wouldn't know any other term). And it's rather normal. You should definitely leave the finger in place for a change from A to D and back, just try to move the finger as little as possible.

There are a few tricks to lessen or avoid finger noise (coated strings, various "fluids", etc.), but quite frankly I wouldn't bother with that just now. Keep practicing, and in time the noise will probably lessen all by itself (some things have a tendency to sort themselves out).
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: tepidarium on December 08, 2011, 09:11:49 pm
Hi,

So, I'm on the one-minute chord changes lesson. I can see that it's going to take me weeks (or months?) to get to the 60 changes per minute that Justin advises.

In that time, should I stay put at this lesson or look at some lessons following it?  Because, right now,my nightly practice is still just doing the chord changes, but, as I said, I think this could potentially take many weeks or months. Should I just sit at lesson BC 115 during this time?

Thanks.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: shadowscott007 on December 08, 2011, 10:19:26 pm
If you understand the lesson and keep it in your practice routine, I would continue on. 

Shadow
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: supcan on January 04, 2012, 12:32:39 am
Hello all,
I've given up on guitar a few times in the past.  Reading this website made things kinda click for me.
I started stage 1 yesterday and am really working on my chord changes.  I'm doing between 16 - 20/minute for each, some mistakes in there.
My thing is I make a rough noise sometimes when my fingers leave the strings to change chords.  Any tips on getting rid of this?

I ordered the Beginner Song book and can't wait to get a crack at the songs!

Cheers!

-Sup
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Arsenal on January 04, 2012, 12:56:13 am
I am guessing you are referring to the open strings ringing out when you take the fretting hand from the strings to change chords because your fingertips get 'sticky' on the strings...if that is the case, I'd not worry about it as I had the same problem too...it wont be too much of an issue once your calluses get tough...also, you could try pressing a bit lighter...you only need to press as hard as it takes to produce a clear note, no harder...

Cheers
Srini
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: jacksroadhouse on January 04, 2012, 07:34:15 am
Make sure that you lift the fingers off (upwards from the fingerboard) and you don't flick them off (sideways), which would make the open string ring out somewhat. The rest comes in time. My fingers learned how to lift off quietly all by themselves ;)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: kelter on February 24, 2012, 09:56:41 am
Hi all-I'm having some hand cramps when I move from A to E.  When I go to move my second finger up, the other fingers start to cramp up and as a result this is my slowest scoring 1 minute chord change.  The cramp never lasts after I move my finger and I don't notice it at any other time-am I doing something wrong or is my puny hand just trying to build muscles?  I've only been playing for a week, so maybe it's just learning to use new muscles?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: jacksroadhouse on February 24, 2012, 10:19:35 am
Honestly, after one week of learning, you shouldn't even bother with measuring your speed.

Slow down. Then slow down some more. Practice the chord change very, very slowly and deliberately. Try to relax your hand. Watch how hard you press the strings down. In the beginning, most people press too hard, which can lead to weird reactions in the hand.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: mtangen on February 29, 2012, 09:09:21 am
I just started out with the beginners course, though I have been playing on & off for 1/2 year so for me the first chords is great repetition. But I have a question regarding these 1min chord changes.

How often should we be doing them? I was thinking once pr. training session for each chord change. Currently (@ 3 chords) I would be doing 3 1 minutes changes a day / training session. Does this sound ok?

I got above 50 chord changes on my first run-through (counting every chord). Not every chord was 100% perfect, but it sounds ok! And after all, the point was to move fast right? I need to work a bit on my strumming though, can't find a good technique. Right now I am using only my thumb, which I'm guessing is not the way to do it  :D
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: misterg on February 29, 2012, 07:45:37 pm
Hi mtangen,

Justin puts a practice schedule at the end of each stage - for example:

http://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-119-PRACTICEstage1.php

What you've suggested is what he recommends, so no problem there.

Justin holds back on teaching strumming until your chord changes are happenning quite quickly, so you get a clear run at developing a solid rhythm without having the distraction of trying to learn chords at the same time. You need a little patience to do it this way, but it will be worth it. Rhythm is *the* most important part of playing.

Strumming with your thumb is OK, but you might want to get a pick.

If you're hitting 50 changes, then move on - practice what you can't do, not what you can :)

Andy
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: AndrewBW on March 03, 2012, 03:21:01 am
Hi all-I'm having some hand cramps when I move from A to E.  When I go to move my second finger up, the other fingers start to cramp up and as a result this is my slowest scoring 1 minute chord change.

Are you by any chance trying to play Justin's D7 form on the A chord? I tried playing that for a while but had to stop because it made my hand cramp up horribly. At first I found it was actually easier to finger than the regular A because it spread my fingers out more. But ultimately doing the regular fingering (4 on B, 3 on G, 2 on D) easier on my hand. That said, I think lots of people find A the hardest chord to finger, and if you've only been playing for a week then I think you've probably got a ways to go.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Smilemaker on March 05, 2012, 11:57:32 pm
I started playing about 6 weeks ago and I am in the middle of stage 3. I'm just curious to know from people who have completed the beginner's course: how long did it take to complete the entire beginner's course. I practice about 30 - 45 min per day and I think I am going along at a fair pace. I am trying to set a challenging, but doable goal for myself and I would like to get some ideas as to how to set it. Thanks!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Dr Winterbourne on March 06, 2012, 12:04:40 am
I practiced about the same omount as you, and it took me about 6 months, I think.

But judge it by the criteria of the lessons, not by time.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Drubbing on March 06, 2012, 02:19:20 am
I'm a tad confused about 1 minute changes' proficiency'. I count each single chord strummed as 1, so C1, G2, C3... etc. In the vids, Justin says target 60 - even really thumping along on my easy (finger anchor) chords I'm only getting into the 50s. For most chords up to stage 3, I'd be in the 30s.

But I still stumble on a couple of the songs, which I saw is also acceptable.

So where are you deemed proficient enough to move on, and add stuff to your practice repertoire? I'm in no hurry, I want to learn the basics as well as I can without skipping, but getting into the 60s with all chords so far is going to take a looong time. I'm currently managing about a hour or more a day, but usually broken into 2 sessions.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: jacksroadhouse on March 06, 2012, 07:13:19 am
@Drubbing: generally speaking, if you feel you're ready to add something new to your practice routine, that's the right point. Just make sure that you have enough practice time to keep working on what you already learned. The more you learn, the more flexible your fingers become and the more control you gain, so what you learn tomorrow may help solve things you struggle with today.

Beyond that, I seem to remember Justin mentioning that 30c/s is a good threshold to move on to the next stage. Not quite sure about that, though.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: AndrewBW on March 06, 2012, 08:29:19 pm
I think that sometimes when you struggle with something it's just good to forget about it for a while and move on to something new, and go back to it later. It's good to struggle with things, but frustration can lead to boredom and resentfulness, and then you just need to let things settle into your head. Once it gets in there, the act of recalling it later is very helpful in learning.

I've been working on the beginner course off and on for about six months and am up to stage eight. I generally practice for about an hour a day. I've also been taking a break now and then to work on some other things, both from Justin (like some of his blues and folk lessons) and on my own. But as I'm nearing the end now I'm really trying to shore up the things in the beginner course that are still spotty, and get better at some of the songs. I'm hoping that in another month or two I'll finish stage nine and be ready to move on to the next level.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: ComfyJammies on March 07, 2012, 03:38:07 am
I started playing about 6 weeks ago and I am in the middle of stage 3. I'm just curious to know from people who have completed the beginner's course: how long did it take to complete the entire beginner's course. I practice about 30 - 45 min per day and I think I am going along at a fair pace. I am trying to set a challenging, but doable goal for myself and I would like to get some ideas as to how to set it. Thanks!
I'm just about to start stage 9 and I've been going about 6 months.   I wasn't starting from scratch though, so the first few stages went very quickly.  For me, stage 6 with the F chord was a big block for me though, so that one alone took 2 months and slowed me down, but I moved on and kept working on it through 7 and 8 and still do every day in my one-minute changes.  When you get to stage 6 and beyond, you are working on so many things, not just chord changes, but scales, fingerpicking, blues, harder strumming patterns, etc, so things do slow down. If the F chord is easier for you, you may get through quicker.   My current goal is to finish stage 9 by April (so about 7-8 months total).

You put your question in the 1-minute changes so I'll say those were the single biggest thing that improved my guitar playing.  Getting up over 50-60 for all of the changes really really helps.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Drubbing on March 07, 2012, 04:22:06 am

You put your question in the 1-minute changes so I'll say those were the single biggest thing that improved my guitar playing.  Getting up over 50-60 for all of the changes really really helps.


Agreed. Just strumming out chords would be mind numbing and progress wouldn't be great. Just trying to get really fast and being a little sloppy does the trick, and when you slow down the fingers catch up. Really helps with the muscle memory.

Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: BarbaraH on April 04, 2012, 07:38:44 pm
Hi :)
Enjoying the 1min challenge - can't believe I still have skin on my fingers  :) I was wondering if you advise moving between three cords. I've been doing the A,D and E together today but wondered if it's better just to do two chords to secure technique. I found I was fine doing three but wasn't sure if you think this is a good idea
Thanks - really enjoying the hard copy of Beginner book and Beginner Song Book
Barbara ;D
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bradt on April 04, 2012, 08:19:26 pm
Honestly, after one week of learning, you shouldn't even bother with measuring your speed.

Slow down. Then slow down some more. Practice the chord change very, very slowly and deliberately. Try to relax your hand. Watch how hard you press the strings down. In the beginning, most people press too hard, which can lead to weird reactions in the hand.

Aren't you are supposed to go fast on the 1 minute changes? I though that's the whole point of them. The idea isn't to be a speed demon, but to be able to improve speed and write it down in your practice journal so you can measure improvement over time.



I think the cramps are normal. I got them too; still do if I practice tight chords for too long (A,D,etc). These are positions your hands are not used to going into. If you start cramping, practice something else for a while. It stops doing it eventually, so don't try to force it.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bradt on April 04, 2012, 08:31:21 pm
I'm a tad confused about 1 minute changes' proficiency'. I count each single chord strummed as 1, so C1, G2, C3... etc. In the vids, Justin says target 60 - even really thumping along on my easy (finger anchor) chords I'm only getting into the 50s. For most chords up to stage 3, I'd be in the 30s.

It's pretty boring, but I like to pop out a metronome and set it to just higher than my changes have been and play along for a few minutes. I found that the rhythm has helped me play cleaner by avoiding the mad dash of finger confusion in between each change. I keep doing the 1 minute changes too, but adjust my metronome as the count improves.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: misterg on April 04, 2012, 11:17:32 pm
Aren't you are supposed to go fast on the 1 minute changes? I though that's the whole point of them.

Yes.

The one minute changes aren't about rhythm or accuracy particularly - it's a competitive training exercise that has been proven to help people get up to speed with chord changes.

Accuracy comes from the 'Strum Pick Strum' exercise which should go side by side with the 'One Minute Changes' exercise. Rhythm is introduced later in the Beginner's Course.

@Jack - it does start very early in the course. Justin teaches the chords & gets people changing between them as quickly as possible (not to any rhythm) before moving on to teaching rhythm & strumming. It's very clever, because it's a way of getting this out of the way so that slow chord changes don't hinder people when they move on to strumming and songs.

@Drubbing - keep at it, and speed will come. FWIW I stopped doing changes once I consistently got >50 on that pair of chords and thought that was OK.

@Barbara - Hi :)  I wouldn't worry about doing 3 chords. It's not something you will be doing when you play songs. If you get the pairs of chords up to speed, the rest will take care of itself - move on.

Andy
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: amolpatily2010 on May 29, 2012, 07:55:11 am
I am doing 30 or so changes. But, as I try to increase the speed, I realised that when I am changing the chords I have to look at both of my hands- left hand to get the chords right and right hand to see from where I am starting the strum (6th, 5th or 4th for E,A,D respectively)- So, this is kinda acting as a hindrance to get the chords faster. Atleast If I were to constantly able to look at only one hand, then maybe it would increase my speed significantly. But, If I try avoiding the left hand, then I get the chords but not consistently right and similarly not looking at the right hand makes me strum more or less strings.
Any suggestions or opinions will be helpful.
 
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: jacksroadhouse on May 29, 2012, 08:06:14 am
When you're doing one minute changes and you're gunning for speed, forget your right hand (strumming hand) for the moment. If you hit the A string on a D chord it's not the end of the world. This exercise is more about the fretting hand and (and this one's for you ;)) about getting you to not think that much about it and just do it.

In time you should try to not look at your hands at all (like Justin always says: from stage there are much more interesting things to look at). When your in the rhythm and doing the changes, just look up for a moment. Get used to the idea of letting your hands do their job on their own.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: amolpatily2010 on May 29, 2012, 08:27:59 am
Okay.. I get the point. So now after getting the strumming hand out of the question And yes I was trying to make the chords without looking at the hands and in the process I get first few changes right, then again would press a wrong string or so and gradually & unknowingly (that would be obvious because i am not looking at the hands) i would move my fingers away from the frets.
Or simply put as, now as I am concentrating on the speed,
should I not all worry about getting nice chords
 ( in this case it will be done by looking at the frettting hand)?
OR
 I refrain from looking at the hand..get a few good changes, then if I accidentally moved on a wrong string, have a quick glance get it right & continue without looking at the hand. Of course, it will reduce my speed but still seems as a better option in the longer run and this increases my dilemma now..
what should I do?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Drubbing on May 29, 2012, 08:41:04 am
It's primarily a speed exercise, so you'd make it far more difficult not watching you fretting hand. Forming chords without looking comes with practice and repetition - not very helpful when simply learning them.

Focus on your fretting hand and just strum, it doesn't matter if you strum a string or two too many. Strumming chords is going to be easier to learn than fretting them, so focussing on fretting.

Eveyone will hear it if you get a chord fretted wrong, few will if you get it right but strum and extra string.

The idea is to build speed first, accuracy comes from getting your fingers into position faster, and it does work.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: amolpatily2010 on May 29, 2012, 08:56:32 am
hey mate thanks for dat & I got that point.. I was facing another problem now whether to try unperfect chords with lesser speed by not looking at the fretting hand.. OR get good chords with better speed by looking at the fretting hand..
I know with time I have to get it without looking at the hand but what should do now in 1 min changes..?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Chantal on May 29, 2012, 09:18:27 am
Okay.. I get the point. So now after getting the strumming hand out of the question And yes I was trying to make the chords without looking at the hands and in the process I get first few changes right, then again would press a wrong string or so and gradually & unknowingly (that would be obvious because i am not looking at the hands) i would move my fingers away from the frets.


I have had this problem too. And then one day I noticed I was playing a song without looking at either hand, but just reading the chords in the song book.

I don't know when I stopped looking at my hands for those chords, it must have been something that happened gradually. I do know I intentionally practiced taking my hand off the guitar neck, relaxing my fingers and then grabbing a specific chord without looking at the guitar first. I did that in my chord practice and maybe it helped me in getting the feel for the chord changes too.

But anyway, you will notice one day that you're playing your chords (or at least these ones) without looking at the strings and still getting them right. And it may happen sooner than you think 'cause I haven't been playing very long either!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: jacksroadhouse on May 29, 2012, 09:19:32 am
I'd say start with looking away for a short moment from time to time. Try to get the idea out of your head that you need your eyes to form a chord. You can also sit down and try to find a chord without looking at your hand, just to get the feel for it. Doing that can greatly improve your accuracy, too. Feel the strings, the frets, the positions.

This isn't something overwhelmingly important in the beginning, but I think it's a good idea to get it into your practice routine in some form or other. Otherwise it'll be very difficult to "unlearn" that habit later on.

And once you can play without looking (at least most of the time - not talking about a 10 fret slide here), it makes you a much more relaxed player. It also enables you to sing while you play, which is very difficult of your neck is "craned" over the guitar. You can read chord sheets, tabs, or sheet music while you play, and consequently you can just play something from a piece of paper without having to memorize everything first. Also, let's face it: it doesn't look cool when a guitarist is bending over his guitar and constantly nodding his head between neck and body ;) In the beginning many people find that necessary, but at some point you should get rid of that habit.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: dalepres on May 31, 2012, 12:41:06 am
The one minute changes are a great exercise.  I think they work particularly well because you set the one minute time.  It keeps us going long enough to get benefit - though I have to admit that with the three fingered A to D to E changes, I can't do a whole minute before hand cramps stop me.  But I'm getting closer than the 10 or 15 seconds I started at.

But the amazing thing about this exercise that made me want to post here is that it has really helped.  I am one of those guys with the short fat fingers of a man who has worked with tools his whole life.  Though short, my hands are broad enough that even strangers have commented on them.  I was certain that I would never get the three-fingered A on my 1 3/4 inch neck.  My fingers are too short for a 2 inch classical neck and too fat for the narrow neck.

But enough excuse making and whining.  As helpless as it seemed, I stuck with the one-minute exercise and now I can do the change from A to D or A to E at a full cycle every 2 seconds.  I can only do it for about 30 to 40 seconds before my hands give out but that will come, too.  With all that working with my hands, including years of gripping exercises at the gym, I guess none of it exercised my hand muscles in the same way that squeezing the guitar neck between my fingers and thumb does.

Thanks, Jusin and company, for a great site and for lessons that actually work.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Blue Merseysider. on June 01, 2012, 01:44:03 pm
This 1 minute exercise thingymubob, the way we're told to hold the 'A' chord (basically with the fingers crossed as if it's a 'D7' chord) I'm struggling with (it's as if my fingers are too big).

I noticed in the songs later on in the book that in the chord diagram's we're being told to hold the 'A' in the more traditional (I believe) '1,2,3' across the fret pose.

Isn't this a bit confusing?  IE - Learn/Practice with one chord shape, only to use a different one later on?  Or doesn't this matter?

To quote Penelope Pitstop..."Haelp, Haelp!!!"
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Chantal on June 01, 2012, 02:16:06 pm
*dashes to find song book*

Looks like the only instances where other finger placements are shown, is where different chords are involved, such as A7sus4, where it's easier to change to Cadd9 and G if you use the more traditional fingerplacement. Or the instance where traditional fingering makes playing an Asus4 a piece of cake. And then there's the Am7/G chord which has a 123 fingering, but that's because it's basically a C chord but with the 5th and 6th strings swapped.

Justin explains when he shows A chord for the first time that other ways of fingering the chord are possible and that sometimes, they are recommended when used with other chords. But most of the time, 213 is the way to go because it allows you to play closer to the fret.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: jacksroadhouse on June 01, 2012, 09:11:36 pm
The so-called "more traditional" finger placement (all in a row) is actually a lot harder in the long run, especially with bigger fingers. The index finger on the D string can get pretty far away from the fret, which means you need lots of strength and it's difficult to keep the string from buzzing. The 213 fingering also makes it much easier to change to other chords, especially "usual suspects" like D or Em. My advice is to stick with it, it's worth the effort.

This is one of the things I wished someone had told me back then. I wasted a lot of time trying to make sense of the "123" A chord, before I learned the other fingering and a couple of days later the problem was solved for good.

@Chantal: the mini-barre A is a possibility, but usually not a very good one. Almost everybody mutes the high E string with that fingering, and that'll be sorely missed if you're in a chord progression with other chords containing the high E string, not to mention that it severely limits your options for arpeggiating etc. Imho that's one of those "extra clever" tricks that can cost a lot of time in the end. And let's face it, the A chord is not exactly a hard one, even for the beginner's course (try a B7 for flavour).
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Diamond Dave on June 03, 2012, 01:35:18 am
especially "usual suspects" like D or Em.

Only if you play Em with 1 and 2 and not 2 and 3.  :)

Justin uses both and is pretty ambivalent it seems in the lessons about which you use.

Jacksroadhouse has more experience than me, but I'd say which not learn all three--1-2-3, 2-1-3, and the mini-barre? You're going to learn a boat load of chords in the beginner's course anyway; two variations won't really add to your load that much.

And eventually, your chord changes will get so fast (give yourself a few months) that it really won't matter. You'll be zipping all over the fretboard.  :)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: jacksroadhouse on June 03, 2012, 07:58:12 am
Sorry, Dave, but imho for a beginner it doesn't make much sense to learn (and more importantly to practice) three different fingerings for one chord. There's so much to learn people really shouldn't waste time on details like that (we're talking stage 1 here). For now I'd pick one fingering that's versatile enough to do everything you want to do, and stick with it.

Once you got past a certain point in learning guitar, things like that won't matter that much anyway. You'll just use the fingering that suits the situation, there's usually no real "learning" involved anymore. E.g. I use 4 different fingerings fpr the open Em, depending on what I did before and what I'm going to do next. And believe it or not, the easiest and most versatile fingering is indeed 213.

I also just had a look at Justin's A chord lesson and Im having a hard time finding any ambiguity in terms of fingering in there. Let me quote:

"The one [fingering] that I think is the best now..."
"The one that I'm gonna show you works really, really, really good for..."
"I'm gonna show you my recommended way of playing an A chord",
"...if you really wanna do one of those other ones then do it, but I will hopefully give you enopugh good reasons to play the A chord with my suggested fingering"
"And this is the fingering for a A chord that I really recommend"
"I really, really recommend that you do these fingers..."

Later on he has a lesson on the "mini barre A", but I think that's more about introducing the idea of barres in preparation for big barre chords than anything else, which is the same reason why he teaches power chords very early on.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Diamond Dave on June 03, 2012, 03:19:55 pm
I had no problem learning three fingerings for A. It's not rocket science even at stage 1.

In other, later lessons, Justin says things like "whatever fingering for A you're using...Here I'm using (this fingering) because..."

Just a difference of opinion, jack. That's allowed.  ;)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Dynamite on June 04, 2012, 08:02:40 am
When I change chords I find it easier in most cases to put down my fingers one at a time (the one exception is E-AM where all my finders move together). Is this a bad practice?

Try as I might I am unable to move all three fingers  to corresponding strings simultaneously.

Thanks
Perfopt
putting fingers one at a time is not at all bad for anybody who is beginner!! but if you are thru with the chord than you should slowly go for changes ,like common changes are G,D,C or Am, D,G G,Emaj,D etc.. considering G,D,C first start by individually picking each chord and then slowly go after the changes.. always focus on the shapes of chords and accordingly change them. Many chords can just be changed by just adjusting 0ne or two fingers..like Emaj toEmin,Emaj to B7..etc.. not to panic and frustrate it takes time but you will eventually learn it.. :D

If at all tired and frustrated than watch  any of the justin's lesson and you will get back in rythm as the lessons are very motivating !! hope this info will help you... ;) :)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: DA_music on June 05, 2012, 07:20:58 am
Just a quick question. How common is it to find yourself letting the chords ring out and then going "oh ****, I'm doing the 1-minute changes!"? I'm getting around 20 individual chords per minute and I think I could be on 30 if I wasn't allowing (not a conscious choice) them to ring out when I strum.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Dynamite on June 05, 2012, 07:32:04 am
Just a quick question. How common is it to find yourself letting the chords ring out and then going "oh ****, I'm doing the 1-minute changes!"? I'm getting around 20 individual chords per minute and I think I could be on 30 if I wasn't allowing (not a conscious choice) them to ring out when I strum.
you will soon cross 50 if you are not concentrating on ringing... focus on shapes and correctness of playing chords and not the numbers... coz if you are fingering the chord right than you yourself will enjoy the elegance of playing  it.... :D
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: DA_music on June 05, 2012, 01:18:14 pm
you will soon cross 50 if you are not concentrating on ringing... focus on shapes and correctness of playing chords and not the numbers... coz if you are fingering the chord right than you yourself will enjoy the elegance of playing  it.... :D

Thanks. So does the counting become a little secondary when you focus on the shapes even though the goal is to keep getting a higher amount?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Dynamite on June 05, 2012, 04:21:37 pm
you will soon cross 50 if you are not concentrating on ringing... focus on shapes and correctness of playing chords and not the numbers... coz if you are fingering the chord right than you yourself will enjoy the elegance of playing  it.... :D

Thanks. So does the counting become a little secondary when you focus on the shapes even though the goal is to keep getting a higher amount?
Initially shape matters and when you are confident enough  then count matters... ;)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: amolpatily2010 on June 08, 2012, 11:50:41 am
I was able to do all the 3 types of changes in the 50s. So, I moved onto Stage 2. But, I have realised now that in all the changes involving D chord, for eg- in A-D I keep the 3rd finger first and then the 2nd finger. So, isn't that a bad habit? Am I not supposed to keep them both at the same time. What should I do to change the habit? I mean , I am still touching the 50 mark but to make it 60, I guess I need to make them touch the strings at the same time. But, trying to do that makes me feel to start over once again, you know what I mean I have just got used to that way..
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Dr Winterbourne on July 09, 2012, 08:58:26 am
If you mean move, and not keep, then you are seeing where you will go eventually.

At first, most people tend to move one finger at a time. Soon you will get to Air Changes, and you will learn a new and better way. Your figures will drop at first, but then start to rise as you master that method.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Oddo on August 19, 2012, 07:23:53 pm
I have been practising the A,D,E 1 minute changes for 10 days and lately i seem to get stuck at about 17 changes/minute.Is this a normal thing to happen or my expectations for now are too high?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Flashmann on August 19, 2012, 07:56:02 pm
I have been practising the A,D,E 1 minute changes for 10 days and lately i seem to get stuck at about 17 changes/minute.Is this a normal thing to happen or my expectations for now are too high?

Being where you are,just weeks ago,I think I can help.I kind of had the same problem,til I slowed it down and spent 2 days really hitting the strum and pick each string exercise.I found,after doing that,that not only had my fingers loosened up some but that I seemed to have "dialed in" the finger placement on those chords.I also kept track,on paper,what I was working on,A-E,A-D,E-D,and could see measureable progress daily.A week later I was getting 60+ BPMs on those changes.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Oddo on August 19, 2012, 09:29:51 pm
Ok,so maybe i should take my time and start to "learn" my fingers the shortest way from one chord to another in order to improve my speed.How much did it take you to start singing songs?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bradt on August 20, 2012, 12:07:55 am
Are you counting A-E-A-E as four changes or two?

If two, then move on to the next stage. You're doing fine.

If you're counting that as four then that is still fine, but a little slow. One thing that helped me was to practice with a metronome. Set your metronome to 40bpm and try to make a change every other beat. That should get you up to 20 relatively quickly since you are so close. Then just speed it up a little bit as you improve.


The early lessons in this course are designed to be moved through relatively quickly. You'll find things in stage 3 and 4 that will make practicing what you learned in stage 1 much easier. If you check the practice schedule on stage 1, you will see at the bottom justin says that you aren't meant to master anything at these stage before advancing. You're just meant to know the material and be able to perform the tasks at a reasonable level.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Diamond Dave on August 20, 2012, 01:14:18 am
Some suggestions that Justin recommends:

-start very slowly--comically slow--and build up speed gradually
-force the changes. Just go to the chord even if you botch it. Get your fingers used to moving quickly.
--air chords. Practice setting your fingers down in the correct positions, all at once. Fix them into place in the air over the fretboard and place them down. Don't strum. Then do the second chord. Then back to the first.
--Try to minimize finger movement and look to see which fingerings the chords have in common. For example, an open C and an open Am chord share the same fingerings for your index and middle finger. The ring finger is the only one that moves; the index and middle should stay planted. Similarly, an open E is just an Am, with everything moved one string over. Easy change.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: TB-AV on August 20, 2012, 03:14:17 am
how long have you been playing?

If you are counting A to D to E as 1, A D E as 2, A D E as 3 then as a beginner 17 would not be bad. I just tried it and and did 17 like that in about 20sec or 3x your speed which sounds about right for a beginner.

Now if you are counting  A D E as 3, A D E 6, A D E 9 then that needs some work.

That A D E sequence is not the easiest thing. A D A E A D A E is easier. with the difficulty considered your are getting about 1 per second. It would be nice to see that doubled but that's a good start.

Don't keep practicing the same thing. If you reach a plateau go to something else. come back to it about 5 - 10 days later and you will probably  be a -lot- better at it.  In fact if you have over saturated on a chord or two, I would try not to play those specific chords for any reason for at least two days or more.



Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Oddo on August 20, 2012, 08:54:29 am
@bradt I count A-E-A-E as two changes.I've already moved on to the next stage but i thought i had a problem with these three chords since i couldn't improve my speed.
@TB-AV I have been playing guitar for about 20 days.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Flashmann on August 20, 2012, 03:42:19 pm
Ok,so maybe i should take my time and start to "learn" my fingers the shortest way from one chord to another in order to improve my speed.How much did it take you to start singing songs?

I haven't even tried singing,at least not outside of my own head..Trust me...NO ONE wants to hear that,especially me.LOL...

I'll say this,though,and almost ashamedly:I was stuck where you are,on phase 1 for nearly 2 months.It seemed like I had to put my fret fingers through contortions,to find those first 3 chords...When I first felt I had them down well enough to attempt the minute changes,I measured my BPMs 2 ways...1st,as fast as I could,regardless of how badly it sounded,and boy did it ever sound bad.2nd,as fast as I could while hitting then cleanly..There was a diference of about 15 BPM,until I slowed down and only concentrated on the clean strums.Now I can get 80+ BPM on A-E and A-D..E-D is still in the upper 60s..

When I got all 3 consistantly above 40,(counting A-E as 1)I moved on to phase 2,and was a very happy to see those chords,the minors go MUCH quicker.2 weeks and I was learning the phase 3 C and G,all the while practicing what came before.

Now,probably a month after beginning phase 3,I only am practicing the Phase 1&2 chords while "playing around" after my structured practice time,or with the strumming patterns.I currently devote my minute change practice time to the C,G with each other and the "7" chords from stage 4 and 5...

Sorry for being so long winded,but my point was to show how I was where you are a very short time ago and to stress just KEEP at it....It will come...
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: vedderfan94 on September 25, 2012, 08:26:52 pm
Should I be letting the chord ring out like justin does? I tried that at first but there are annoying sounds in between changing chords because I think it's due to pulling off the second and third fingers. So now I strum each chord but mute the strings quickly with my strumming hand, and then move to the next chord. Is this wrong?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Jimmydreams on January 03, 2013, 12:50:16 am
I've been playing about 2 weeks. I'm building up the calluses on my fingers and I'm starting to work on not pressing so hard that the strings come out the back of my fingers.  ::)

My question is this: while attempting the 1 minute chord changes, I find that my #2 finger seems to lose most of it's sensitivity and therefore it's hard to know when it's properly seated on the high E string. Is this common and/or will increased calluses only make matters worse? Perhaps it's a symptom of early callus buildup that the sensitivity is masked by the combo of numbness/finger pain that all beginners have.....??? Regardless, it makes getting a clean D chord sometimes a hit or miss proposition!!  :-[

If it's a case of simply muscle memory, I guess I can wait for it to become natural.

Suggestions?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: mouser9169 on January 05, 2013, 04:36:02 am
I've been playing about 2 weeks. I'm building up the calluses on my fingers and I'm starting to work on not pressing so hard that the strings come out the back of my fingers.  ::)

My question is this: while attempting the 1 minute chord changes, I find that my #2 finger seems to lose most of it's sensitivity and therefore it's hard to know when it's properly seated on the high E string. Is this common and/or will increased calluses only make matters worse? Perhaps it's a symptom of early callus buildup that the sensitivity is masked by the combo of numbness/finger pain that all beginners have.....??? Regardless, it makes getting a clean D chord sometimes a hit or miss proposition!!  :-[

If it's a case of simply muscle memory, I guess I can wait for it to become natural.

Suggestions?

Pretty much its the calluses.  What will happen as your fingers toughen (and you'll actually go through a few sets of calluses) is that your muscle sensitivity in the rest of your hand will increase. So what you lose in your fingertips you gain in your fingers, if that makes sense.

If it doesn't, don't worry about it and just keep practicing - but be sure to do them slow enough that you make the chords perfectly. If you practice making them wrong, you'll get better at making them wrong.

Practice makes permanent.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: TheCasual on January 13, 2013, 09:29:38 pm
I'm doing around 20 changes per min ATM. Just wonder how many changes I should be on to start attempting the songs? I've been on this section since Thursday.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bradt on January 13, 2013, 09:39:05 pm
Start now if you like. Just do the simple strumming that Justin shows. The sooner you get started making music, even in simplified forms, the better :)

If you try it and feel it's too much, then come back to it later.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Cal on January 13, 2013, 09:51:58 pm
I'm doing around 20 changes per min ATM. Just wonder how many changes I should be on to start attempting the songs? I've been on this section since Thursday.
What bradt said.  And just to reinforce that here's a snippet from Justin's book:

Quote
When should I move on to Stage 2?
  • You should have your One-Minute changes down to at least 20 changes in a minute.
  • You should be able to play one or two of the songs from the songbook, even if you have to start and stop a little bit here and there.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Dana on February 05, 2013, 01:29:56 am
ok iam at 60 a min just not every time should i do all three cords next and see how many i can do i have gone over 60 with a few blunders  i also have trouble keeping my fretting hand in an arch my number one finger seem to always touch the high e causing the dreaded  buzz   
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bradt on February 05, 2013, 02:18:42 am
If your hitting 60 per minute with only a few blunders, then I'd say you're good to go. Maybe practice a few of the songs if you haven't already, but certainly start on the next stage.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: 7255carl on February 06, 2013, 11:57:52 am
Hi Dana

i agree with bradt if you are hitting 60 even with a few dodgy changes in there you are probably good to move on, personally i like to hit 60 3 days in a row before i move on but thats probably a bit of over kill, for example below was my number for A-D from way back when:

18, 30, 33, 39, 40, 38, 46, 50, 54, 61, 65, 71, this was practicing the changes every day and counting them every other day, i just checked the date on those changes 03 2010 ;), and i still look back at the beginners course now if i am not happy with something, in a few months time you will not believe how far you have come

all the best

Carl 8)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: georgemoe on February 16, 2013, 03:39:55 am
Hi everyone. Newb just checking in.

At age 53, I had a few starts and stops learning and never got very far. Always had issues with speed and smoothness of chord changes.

I discovered Justin's site a few days ago via a reference in the AGF forum. WOW! I can't wait to get a bit further. Justin's suggested A fingering is slowing me down a bit because I was using a 234 fingering so 213 is a huge change. I'm stuggling fitting all three fingers. Need to really force things with high pressure. But I'll work through it.

Really helpful people here so thank you!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Craig Howard on February 16, 2013, 04:52:39 am


Hey George

Think outside the box (fret)

Use what ever fingers it takes to make a chord.

I have thick / short fingers so I often use just 2 fingers to cover  2 or 3 notes (strings)  in the same fret.

eg A,E, D

Look at conventional fingering diagrams.. then see what fingers on which strings  are hidden behind other fingers.  I fyou can cover them..go for it.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Drubbing on February 16, 2013, 04:59:26 am
It's always a good idea to learn the conventional fingering, given any fingering and chords are difficult at first.

Especially with Justin's approach, chords are taught with anchor fingers to other chords in mind, to make them all easier to get. If you use lots of alternatives to conventional fingering, then you miss out on learning easy changes.

After a while you can adapt - I try and do the two version of A as much as possible, and prefer one version of the G over others.

Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: 7255carl on February 18, 2013, 09:53:04 am
Hi Georgemoe

i would suggest staying with it on the A chord for now, but there is a version of the A chord justin calls the A mini-barre, coming up later in the beginners course, if you do have bigger fingers you may find this an easier way, but for now stick to the course, you will get there

Best of luck

Carl 8)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Sundance on February 24, 2013, 09:54:57 pm
Hi everyone,

Hoping someone could give me a few tips regarding A,E,D 1 minute changes.

I have been learning guitar for just over a week and I'm taking my time going through the lessons but I'm not sure I'm doing the 1 minute changes right. I can do about 20 changes so far for each chord but I'm making quite a few mistakes such as touching other strings with my fingers accidentally.

Do i need to slow down until they are perfect?

I'm also having trouble playing the D chord fast, I find it hard to reach the string on the 3rd fret with my finger.

any help would be great
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: shadowscott007 on February 24, 2013, 10:02:29 pm
@sundance

From a different thread, but the same answer applies.

If I recall Justin's instructions correctly, it doesn't have to be perfect but it can't be complete rubbish either.  There is a wide span there.

I would say all the fingers in the correct position but a couple unintentionally muted strings would count as acceptable for the quick change exercise.  Working on getting everything perfect should be done separately at a more sedate pace.

My two cents

Shadow
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bradt on February 24, 2013, 10:23:12 pm
Yeah, the goal of this is to go as fast as you possibly can. Most strums should sound reasonable, but if you're not making any mistakes at all, then you're not pushing yourself.

The D chord just takes a little time. You'll get there....then you'll get to try the D minor  ;D
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: shadowscott007 on February 26, 2013, 12:42:31 pm
ALWAYS be practicing what you learn in songs.

The intent of this exercise is to get you to the point so you can make the changes in songs.

Shadow
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bakajin on March 13, 2013, 04:46:15 pm
When doing the 1 minute changes,  my left thumb keeps slipping from the 3/4 of the way up the fret board to the point where my palm is almost touching the fretboard.  I am not particularly sure why it's moving. 

Am I squeezing  the fretboard too hard and having a slick thumb it moves? 

How do I stop that while still being confident that I am pressing the strings hard enough for my chord?

Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on March 13, 2013, 05:03:48 pm
Quote
How do I stop that while still being confident that I am pressing the strings hard enough for my chord?

You only need to press hard enough for the notes to play cleanly.
Set your fingers on the fret board like your going to play a chord but with very little pressure.
Strum the chord and slowly increase the pressure until the note ring out cleanly. That's all the pressure
you need. If you have a decent guitar and it is set up properly you won't need a lot of pressure. 

 
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bakajin on March 14, 2013, 12:07:03 am
I've always been a full throttle, or not at all sort of person,  Is there any technique I can use to practice not using as much pressure?  I'm not sure I know how to do "just hard enough" when I try slowly increasing the pressure, it feels awkward and when I try the one minute changes, I think excitement has me grip harder. 

Should I practice the 1 minute changes while leaving my thumb suspended in the middle of the air? 
that would prevent gripping the fretboard, but might lead to bad habits.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on March 14, 2013, 12:21:07 am
Just slow down and concentrate on doing it right. Practicing bad habit only make them harder to break.
 
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Drubbing on March 14, 2013, 12:57:30 am
Going full throttle with guitar, you'll simply choke yourself. It's about being smooth and relaxed and that's something that generally comes over time, as you get comfortable with the shapes and changing them. But you'll make that process harder if you try and wring the guitar neck.

You need the thumb to provide a stable backstop, The guitar resting against you and your strumming arm does provide some neck stability, but you will need the thumb to mute top strings later, so it's a good idea to get used to it being on the back
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bradt on March 14, 2013, 04:40:06 am
Yeah, I wouldn't worry about two weeks. Heck, I wouldn't be surprised if you are still working on that 6 months from now.

There comes a point though, that you will find that you are just not fast enough. That is where you will see the need for a light touch more than anything.

For now, Grab it like you mean it. Once you get it down, you'll start developing a feel for the touch. You'll naturally start to lighten the touch as you try to increase speed. As you start learning songs it will develop even more.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: ejohnson1226 on March 14, 2013, 01:34:59 pm
I'm on my 2nd week of the beginners' course, and I just watched/learned this lesson last night. (I work a full time job and have 3 young kids at home, so finding time to play is not that easy =]) Anyhow, I'm finally comfortable in my knowledge of the first 3 chords we've learned, so I decided it was time to move on. Counting each individual chord change as "1," I got 8, 12, and 10 chord changes for D -> A, D -> E, and A -> E, respectively. Is this average? Or should I be doing better?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Drubbing on March 14, 2013, 02:05:47 pm
You're 2 weeks in, it is what it is. Keep going til you can hit 60 changes per minute.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Carlo Von Sexron on March 18, 2013, 02:26:24 pm
Hello All,

Not been here for quite some time. Years ago there was a simple website that someone created that helped with one minute changes. Basically you selected which chords you wanted to practice and a couple of other parameters and the chords would randomly appear on screen for a set time/amount. You then play the chord on screen and then change to the next one when it pops up.

Is anything like that still around? I've tried searching but the search function isn't that helpful and there doesn't seem to be posts pre-2011.

Thanks for any help you can offer
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Metallica_1981 on April 29, 2013, 08:06:35 am
Hey guys,
I started playing the guitar like 5 days ago.. and today I started with my 1 minute changes.
D to A I hit like  46 times (23). They are not all perfect, but not bad too. I wanted to ask you is that normal?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: TheCasual on April 29, 2013, 10:55:59 am
Hey guys,
I started playing the guitar like 5 days ago.. and today I started with my 1 minute changes.
D to A I hit like  46 times (23). They are not all perfect, but not bad too. I wanted to ask you is that normal?

Sounds about right that. Just keep doing the changes until you reach about 60 ish. Make sure you're practicing chords on there own. Strum, pick, strum though.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on April 29, 2013, 04:39:09 pm
Hey guys,
I started playing the guitar like 5 days ago.. and today I started with my 1 minute changes.
D to A I hit like  46 times (23). They are not all perfect, but not bad too. I wanted to ask you is that normal?

Don't get fixated on how many chord changes a minute you can do. 10 perfect changes a minute is far
better than 46 sloppy changes.
Quote
They are not all perfect, but not bad too.
Don't practice mistakes, that is a waste of time.
The biggest mistake beginners make is they thinking that more is better so they practice sloppy changes
so they can hit 60 changes a minute. Practice perfect changes then try it again and if you only hit 20
perfect changes your doing better that 46 not perfect changes.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bradt on April 29, 2013, 09:30:42 pm
Practice perfect changes then try it again and if you only hit 20
perfect changes your doing better that 46 not perfect changes.

Yes! Also, practice smooth, even changes. I started out racing to get the numbers high, and neglected that aspect of it, and boy did I regret it. Turns out that what your fingers do while they are in the air is just as important as what they do on the strings.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: farmgirl on April 30, 2013, 06:31:12 pm
Ok I have been playing for around a month or so, I have 3 kids 6,4, and 6 months so my practice time is kinda broken up through out the day. What I work on in the time I get is, (keep in mind that some times I get only 5 to 10 mins at a time)

Doing all chords I know, as in finger placement and strumming the right strings only, C,D,E,Am,Dm,Em,G, and C.
When doing that I make sure they all ring out right.
Then I do chord changes for a bit, no timing it though I only check that 1x a week. I concentrate on making sure they ring out right or I don't count the change.
Then I until today I only did chord change exercises for A,D,E.
I think I am doing pretty good here are todays numbers,
D to E-30
A to A-34
D to A-30, (getting better with this one, this one has been a real thorn in my side)
Now for the 1st time I did these
Am to E-23
Am to DM-14
E to D-28
Em to D-24
Now is there a trick I am missing in the switch between Am to Dm, or is it going to be like with the D to A, and just going to have to plow through it?

Thanks,
 Brandi
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on April 30, 2013, 07:05:07 pm
Quote
Now is there a trick I am missing in the switch between Am to Dm, or is it going to be like with the D to A, and just going to have to plow through it?

A lot of people have trouble with the Dm it's a weird chord compared to the other chords you know.
Just practice slow and really concentrate on doing them correctly and out of the blue you'll be nailing it
every time with out even trying.
The numbers you posted for one minute changes are really good, even better if every chord is ringing out
like it should.

As for your practice time being broken up 5 minutes of good concentrated practice time is better than an
hour of just fooling around so keep putting in those 5 and 10 minute sessions they add up to hours in no
time. 
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bradt on May 01, 2013, 12:47:43 am
Now is there a trick I am missing in the switch between Am to Dm, or is it going to be like with the D to A, and just going to have to plow through it?

Thanks,
 Brandi

Something that helped me in this change was to do it really slowly. Just put your fingers down on Am then lift them straight up and move them all very slowly and simultaneously to their position on Dm. Really pay attention to what you are doing when you do it. There is a sort of pattern there to it, and once you get that, it becomes a very easy change to make.

Give it a go. I'm sure you'll see it. It took me a while to notice it.

Hint: it's almost as easy as E to Am.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: KSanders on May 05, 2013, 11:54:35 am
So I'm really just a beginner, doing my fourth round of chord changes between ADE now, second day of this exercise for me.

I did find out that one thing that's holding back a lot of the speed is that after strumming the chord I tend to wait a little bit for the chord to "sing" for a moment. When I tried to focus on not doing that but just going straight on to the next one after strumming my chord, it took my score from 21 to 28 (single chords, not sets). Possibly this might be something others tend to do as well so I figured I'd post it.

Note that when Justin shows the exercise in his video, he also lifts his left fingers up straight after strumming.

Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: chronophasia on May 11, 2013, 08:23:31 pm
I have seen great improvement with this exercise. The chords are 100% perfect and I still have a bad habit of looking where my strumming hand is landing(the strings and frets don't seem to be as bad). Although I have learned Am,Em, and Dm, I still feel like I should stick with the major chords first. Should I incorporate these into the routine now? I've been averaging about 30 switches lately. It'll probably take a while for me to get to 60 though.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Charlatan30 on May 13, 2013, 11:02:44 pm
Hi, I've been practicing for around 3 months now and checking these forums every now and again.  I found it slightly frustrating to keep reading comments along the lines of 'don't worry it'll just happen' but it is SO true!  I've just had my eureka moment tonight and moved from around 40 strums a minute to over 60.  So I would encourage everyone to stick at it, because it will happen!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Lucky_Luke on August 30, 2013, 10:05:57 am
I manage to do 17-20 chord changes from D-A in a minute, what slows me down is that I need to look at my picking hand too to see if picking the right strings. I haven't figured out picking the strings without looking at them yet. I look at the fretting hand to get the finger placements on the strings correct and then I look at the picking hand to see if I'm picking the right strings. Is there a technique to learn picking the right strings without looking at them. Should I have learnt picking without looking when I was learning the chords? When I was learning the chords D,A & E , my focus was on the fingers and making the chords sound right. I never bothered about being able to pick without looking at the strings.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on August 30, 2013, 03:56:53 pm
Lucky_Luke  try practicing playing the bass note then strumming the chord with out looking.
When playing the A chord pluck the A string only then play the chord with out looking. If you hit the wrong
string don't play the chord and start over. Do it slowly for a few minutes every day and with in a couple
of days you will have it down. Do the same with the D chord. D string first then the chord. Use your ears
and not your eyes. You should also try not looking at your fretting hand let your ears tell you when your
doing it right or wrong.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Dmon1Unlimited on September 07, 2013, 02:57:46 am
So far it has been taking me some time to complete this exercise...

In order to play a chord adequately, i need to see what i am doing i.e. look at my fret hand when going into position and look at my strum hand. I end up with about 40 chord changes.

however, i can meet my target of 60 if i ignore my strum hand and focus on my fret hand (i.e. keep looking at my fretting hand when positioning my hand, and randomly strum)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on September 07, 2013, 03:40:36 am
(i.e. keep looking at my fretting hand when positioning my hand, and randomly strum)

The more you rely on your eyes the longer it will take to learn anything on guitar. Use your ears not your
eyes. Read the four posts above your post.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Dmon1Unlimited on September 07, 2013, 10:16:49 pm
Lucky_Luke  try practicing playing the bass note then strumming the chord with out looking.
When playing the A chord pluck the A string only then play the chord with out looking. If you hit the wrong
string don't play the chord and start over. Do it slowly for a few minutes every day and with in a couple
of days you will have it down. Do the same with the D chord. D string first then the chord. Use your ears
and not your eyes. You should also try not looking at your fretting hand let your ears tell you when your
doing it right or wrong.

erm, just to clarify what i should be doing:
first learn the string names: http://guitar.about.com/od/freebeginnerlessons/ss/guitar_lesson_two_3.htm
then:

1)hold the guitar, dont touch any strings
2)strum A string without looking
3) look at string that was strummed
      3a)if correct string is strummed, then position fret hand to play A chord without looking
               3ai)strum chord
               3aii)check if correct strings were pressed down with fret hand
               3aiii)repeat step 1 onwards again
      3b)if wrong, repeat step 1 onwards again
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: countryguy87 on September 12, 2013, 12:27:28 pm
Just got done with my first week of playing guitar.  I have practiced every day from anywhere between 1-2 hours each day split into 15-30 min. sessions.  Currently at 82 from D to A, 83 from A to E, and 60 from E to D.  I've pretty much been solely practicing chord changes during each practice session.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on September 12, 2013, 05:14:26 pm


erm, just to clarify what i should be doing:
first learn the string names: http://guitar.about.com/od/freebeginnerlessons/ss/guitar_lesson_two_3.htm
then:

1)hold the guitar, dont touch any strings
2)strum A string without looking
3) look at string that was strummed
      3a)if correct string is strummed, then position fret hand to play A chord without looking
               3ai)strum chord
               3aii)check if correct strings were pressed down with fret hand
               3aiii)repeat step 1 onwards again
      3b)if wrong, repeat step 1 onwards again

Your making it more complicated than it need to be. Let's use the A chord as and example.
Fret the A chord. If you need to look then look. Now that your fingering is correct look away from the
strings. Play the A string with out looking. If you've played the A string correctly strum the whole chord.
If you played the E or D string find the A string and play it. If you can do all this with out looking move
on to the D chord. This will help with your accuracy and your Ears will learn what the notes sound like.
You may have to look to make sure you are doing it right but the less you look the faster you'll improve.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Drubbing on September 13, 2013, 01:09:08 am
Personally, I think an absolute beginner is only making it harder by not looking at their fretting hand to learn their chords.

Yes, they might end up relying less on sight earlier than others, but progress will be much slower, and take longer to get onto playing simple songs. This will frustrate many people IMO.

I preferred to learn my chords by sight and let the muscle memory tae over with practice and repetition. Without 'learning' how to do it, I can find and form any open chords (and a few barres) by feel.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bradt on September 13, 2013, 04:31:36 am
Personally, I think an absolute beginner is only making it harder by not looking at their fretting hand to learn their chords.

^ that

Look at your hand while you play. That's fine. When we first learned to tie our shoes we looked very closely at the process as we did it. Now most of us can do it blindfolded without a second thought.

I found the same thing to happen with playing guitar. Eventually you just start looking round naturally. It just happens on its own.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Dr Winterbourne on September 13, 2013, 06:23:00 pm
Just got done with my first week of playing guitar.  I have practiced every day from anywhere between 1-2 hours each day split into 15-30 min. sessions.  Currently at 82 from D to A, 83 from A to E, and 60 from E to D.  I've pretty much been solely practicing chord changes during each practice session.

60 would be fine. You don't need to change that fast yet, as if you just began your strumming wont be that fast yet, especially if you spent all your time on just one aspect. Check the consolidation list for Stage one, because you can do ADE, so maybe time to add some more chords.

Do not over specialize yet; practice chord change speed, yes, but also strumming, and chord accuracy (strum pick strum), aural training and songs. Start on the songs straight away. Just trust the course.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on September 13, 2013, 07:04:14 pm


I preferred to learn my chords by sight and let the muscle memory tae over with practice and repetition. Without 'learning' how to do it, I can find and form any open chords (and a few barres) by feel.

How good are you at learning by ear? You'd be a lot better at it if you used your ear to learn your chords
and not your eye. When you where first learning how many times did you look at your fingers to fret a
chord then strum that chord an it was wrong? I see that happen with beginners all the time. Your ears
never lie but your eyes do. I'm not saying never look, when I'm learning new chords I still look but the
sooner you stop relying on your eye the faster you learn the chord.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Drubbing on September 14, 2013, 01:57:02 am
How good are you at learning by ear? You'd be a lot better at it if you used your ear to learn your chords
and not your eye. When you where first learning how many times did you look at your fingers to fret a
chord then strum that chord an it was wrong?

I used both. My ear sucks though, as I've not done any of the ear training, which I should have.

When playing and not looking I can tell instantly if I've missed a chord slightly. I don't miss by much, but it's obvious. I still use both when learning new chords.

I'm not disputing it's an important skill, but beginners need to decide if they're going to do it - it will slow them down significantly, and some people will prefer the skill to evolve naturally.

I don't have the time or patience to be a really good musician as well, I got 3 kids a FT job and help my wife run a family business. I want to play stuff I enjoy. If that means watching the fretboard more regularly than others, then I can live with that.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Dmon1Unlimited on September 14, 2013, 04:46:38 am
Should you ideally be playing till your fingers hurt?

I want to keep playing till this happens but I always come short because of my wrist getting uncomfortable. I can only play a couple minutes before it gets uncomfortable. It seems like this issue is hindering me from getting the most out of my sessions and making this longer to learn than expected

I've been doing some twisting exercises (holding a book and doing about 50 reps of twisting) but I'm not sure it's working (though I've only started it recently). I also tried to alter my hand placement (when switching between A and E fretting, by having my thumb parallel to the neck instead of perpendicular). This helps although I don't know if this is bad practice
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Drubbing on September 14, 2013, 08:13:26 am
You need to find a relaxed moveable position. The thumb should point upwards, not along the neck.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: misterg on September 14, 2013, 11:08:57 am
Should you ideally be playing till your fingers hurt?

I want to keep playing till this happens but I always come short because of my wrist getting uncomfortable. I can only play a couple minutes before it gets uncomfortable.

It's not unusual for your finger tips to hurt as a beginner, BUT your wrist shouldn't. It sounds like you need to review your posture, etc. to get your wrist into a position where it's comfortable. You may develop serious problems if you don't.

Common beginner issues that seem to come up regularly here are:

1) Tilting the guitar towards you to see the fingerboard which puts pressure on your wrist as it has to bend through the extra angle;

2) Playing on a sofa or a low chair, or an office chair with arms etc. that means you can't adopt a correct seated position;

3) Having the neck of the guitar too low - go as far as having your fretting hand level with your ear!

If you're doing any of these things, try and correct it and get your wrist into a more natural position where it doesn't get uncomfortable.

Once you've developed a bit of technique you can probably compromise on any / all of these things because you will have learnt what doing it right feels like, and can make your own judgement.

I'm not sure what you hope to gain by the twisting exercise - it would concern me that it will do more harm than good.

Seriously - resolve the wrist issue. If you want to post a picture of you in playing position, we may be able to give you some pointers.

Andy
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Djordje on September 14, 2013, 05:01:47 pm
I have a question about progression towards new steps.

Justin stated to stick with a routine until you can do at least 30 chord changes? Is that 30 full changes or per change. Like Dm-Em = 2 changes.

Just wondering.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bradt on September 14, 2013, 07:33:49 pm
I have a question about progression towards new steps.

Justin stated to stick with a routine until you can do at least 30 chord changes? Is that 30 full changes or per change. Like Dm-Em = 2 changes.

Just wondering.

There's been a lot of discussion on this. I think the 30 full changes or 60 individual is a good mark. I moved on at about 20 something, and just kept working on them if one or two of the changes was giving me trouble. If you feel comfortable enough with the chord changes to play along to one of the songs in the lesson using all down strums, I would say you are fine to move on at this early stage.

Some of the stages coming up have techniques that will help a lot with practicing chord changes. As long as you don't jump too far ahead you should be fine.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Dinos_1998 on September 16, 2013, 04:44:10 pm
Ok first I started playing guitar a week ago....
My first results is
D-A = 20
D-E=26
A-E=26

Is that good??? :) :) :-\
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Cal on September 16, 2013, 05:16:15 pm
Is that good??? :) :) :-\
After just one week?  BRILLIANT!

Keep up the good work (I really mean keep up the good play).  :)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Dmon1Unlimited on September 18, 2013, 02:35:15 pm
Move on. Keep practising the D as slow as you need to, to get it right. Then speed it up.

Should you be palm muting the sound after playing each chord?

I get a buzzing sound at the end of my chords, which I suppose is expected because I am releasing my fret hand to play the next chord while the strings are still vibrating. But because I have to change chord as quickly as possible, I can't tell whether the buzzing is because I am genuinely not pressing hard enough or because I'm just switching between chords while the string is still vibrating

Palm muting resolves the issue but also ruins my capability of getting 60 chord changes a minutes

Current progress:
D-A ~60
A-E ~60
E-D ~20
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bradt on September 18, 2013, 02:54:52 pm
I have been stuck on this for weeks now and it is really discouraging :( Someone suggested for me to move onto the next stage and simply keep practising the D changes along with the new chords, but I feel like I would simply leave it behind and never improve on it if I did that.

Does anyone have any suggestions?

Like drubbing said, move on. You're going to be using the D chord A LOT no matter what you do, so you'll get plenty of practice with it. Strangely enough, as you learn new chords your changes on old ones gets better too. Spending weeks on one stage will just burn you out. You'll get it eventually.


Should you be palm muting the sound after playing each chord?

I get a buzzing sound at the end of my chords, which I suppose is expected because I am releasing my fret hand to play the next chord while the strings are still vibrating. But because I have to change chord as quickly as possible, I can't tell whether the buzzing is because I am genuinely not pressing hard enough or because I'm just switching between chords while the string is still vibrating

Nope. If you are having an issue with buzzing it is either your technique or the guitar.

Are you still doing the strum, pick, strum exercise? You should be doing that along with the 1 minute changes so you can suss out where you need work. Just play the chord real slowly and get it sounding good. Once you have that, start doing changes very slowly. See if you can figure out what is causing the buzz.

It's a lot easier to get faster by starting slow and cleanly than it is to get your chords clean by going fast and sloppy. Slow down and really check it out. You'll have it sounding proper in no time.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Northwest29 on September 28, 2013, 03:18:59 am
Greetings all,

At this point in my guitar journey how concerned should I be about changing cords without looking? Is this something that will just happen after a great deal of practice, or is there a future lesson that helps teach a method? Thanks in advance for sharing your thoughts -

Ron
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on September 28, 2013, 03:25:11 am
At the beginning you'll have to look because you don't know the chords. Once you know the chords and
can do the changes the sooner you can do them with out looking the better. At this level it's not the most
important thing but it never to early to start. If you can't do it that OK it will come.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Dinos_1998 on October 02, 2013, 09:23:59 pm
Firstly I bought the deluxe edition of begginers book ITS AMAZING !!!!!
I have seen already some difference. I can easily play all the song from songbook.
Also my changes  are :
D to A =50(No buzz)
D to E = 42(-3 buzzes)
A to E = 60(-2 buzzes)

I'm so glad !!!!  ;D  :D :D :D   ::)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: d.friend on October 04, 2013, 07:10:14 pm
I came up with a practice technique that helped me a lot with chord changes. I thought to share it here and maybe others will find it useful. I was stuck in the high-teens to (on a good day) maybe the low 30s changes per minute. When I started using this technique the change rate went up very quickly and it took only a few days to achieve and consistently make 60 per minute. I stumbled on this while trying to use a metronome to play some of the beginner songs. So this technique has not only helped my chord change speed but also my ability to keep the beat.

Here's what to do.

Use a metronome to keep the beat and strum chords to the beat. Use 4/4 time - four strums (beats) per bar.
Start with a very slow tempo. The metronome on Justin's site wasn't slow enough for me. It seems not to go any slower than 60 beats per minute. But a web search quickly found numerous on line metronomes that do go slower.

Pick any two chords and start by playing one bar of each chord. Playing the chord four times gives me time to think ahead to where the fingers go for the next chord. It also allows time to see if the correct strings are being struck and to make minor finger adjustments to clean up the chord for the next strum. Keep this pattern going until it is working well. Then, without stopping, increase the difficulty by strumming each chord twice per bar. For example strum A twice and then D twice. Keep this pattern going until it is comfortable. Then make the final step and change the pattern to alternate the chord with each strum. Again, don't stop playing, just change the pattern. Try to keep that going for a minute.

If you get all fumble-fingered keep going but change back to the previous, simpler pattern. For example, if alternating on each chord starts going bad switch back to the two and two pattern. If things are really whacked then start over with a full bar of each chord and work your way up to alternating on each strum.

When you can alternate chords with ease increase the tempo on the metronome and start again with 4 strums of each chord per bar.

I was amazed and delighted by how quickly I progressed and hope other beginners find this helpful.

Dave
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Clambone56 on October 07, 2013, 05:41:37 am
d.Friend   

Funnily enough I hit on the same system and swear by it...had been meaning to post something then saw yours. It is a great way of doing it and I find just as you do that when you are changing between 2 chords it is a bit easier to play them twice then change so if you can't keep up with the metronome at say 50/min then you just slow it down to 40/min or whatever (40/min is the slowest mine goes...)  then build up adding 2 beats a minute. It is amazing how the brain soon figures out the changes and you suddenly find you can do that particular change at that speed changing every beat and gradually move up to 60/min. I found that filling in the One Minute changes chart on P. 98 of the beginners book was a great incentive to keep at it as you gradually increase all the changes to 60 (took me a year). The main thing is that every day you see some progress even if it is only a measly 2 beats per minute better, at least it is progress! Feather by feather the goose is plucked....
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Murgul on October 07, 2013, 03:49:27 pm
I want to ask a question.
For example, when you change between C and Am, you move only your 3rd finger, and I want to know if you keep your 1st and 2nd finger pressed down on the chord or you release the chords when you make the change?

Edit: I don't know why it post here, I was in  Topic: BC-134 • 1 Minute Changes
Can a mod please move it?

[mod edit - done]
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: mouser9169 on October 07, 2013, 05:40:20 pm
40 bpm is the slowest some metronomes go because it is _extremely_ difficult for humans to keep time any slower without a lot of practice (which generally involves counting quick divisions - like 16th notes - steadily in your head). So if you need/want to play at 30 bpm, set your metronome to 60, and play on every other click (ie: the metronome is now counting eighth notes instead of quarter notes.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bradt on October 07, 2013, 08:44:33 pm
I want to ask a question.
For example, when you change between C and Am, you move only your 3rd finger, and I want to know if you keep your 1st and 2nd finger pressed down on the chord or you release the chords when you make the change?

When you're playing you will most likely leave your fingers on the strings and just move the one. Sometimes you may lift slightly to mute the chord, but you'll only really move one finger.

During practice, especially at this stage, I would think it would be more beneficial to go ahead and lift all the fingers so that you are laying them down as a complete chord each time.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: mouser9169 on October 07, 2013, 09:09:11 pm
During practice, especially at this stage, I would think it would be more beneficial to go ahead and lift all the fingers so that you are laying them down as a complete chord each time.

I disagree: The way you practice will be the way that you play.

You wouldn't lift your fingers making that chord change while playing (not even for a quick 'mute' since you have open strings playing), so don't lift them when practicing the change.

This isn't "practice making a C chord" and "practice making an A minor chord."
It's "Practice changing from a C chord to Am and from Am to C."

There's a big difference between the two. Yes, that means you shouldn't have much difficulty hitting your changes per minute target for this particular chord combination. That's ok, there will be plenty of others that will have you throwing your picks at the wall in frustration - don't artificially turn this into one of them.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: misterg on October 07, 2013, 10:00:39 pm
I want to ask a question.
For example, when you change between C and Am, you move only your 3rd finger, and I want to know if you keep your 1st and 2nd finger pressed down on the chord or you release the chords when you make the change

For the 1 minute changes, keep as many fingers as possible pressed down (the 'anchor finger(s) ).

When you're doing the other part of the exercise (the strum-pick-strum) you take all of your fingers off.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Chsonnu on November 27, 2013, 02:22:12 pm
Hi all, I have to constantly look at my strumming hand or I'll end up strumming the wrong amount of strings.  Is this a bad habit I should try to break early?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on November 27, 2013, 04:46:11 pm
Hi all, I have to constantly look at my strumming hand or I'll end up strumming the wrong amount of strings.  Is this a bad habit I should try to break early?

The short answer is yes.
To help fix the problem practice plucking the root note first then strum the chord do this a few minutes
every time you practice your chord changes. This will improve the accuracy of your strumming hand and
help you to stop looking.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Newand(hopefully)willing on November 28, 2013, 01:44:13 pm
I've been doing the 1 minute changes for 4 days now, today will be the fifth. It's exciting to watch the improvements - the day before I actually started this exercise I had trouble with anchor finger practice as switching to and from E hurt my 1st finger. it toughened up somewhat in the meantime though. Things got steadily better from there. Yesterday i got the following scores:

D - A: 25
D - E:19
A - E: 21

Yes, i am aware that this isn't a speed contest, hence a question.Sometimes a note won't sound (mostly the 3rd string in E), and for some reason I fail to strum the 5th string in A  once or twice per change. Do you guys think this is acceptable, or should i slow down?

Another thing i find distracting is some kind of tendency to half-strum. What I mean by this is that, probably due to the strum - pick - strum exercises I tend to strum the chords slower than normal in order to detect wrong notes / other mistakes etc. Any advice on combating this?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on November 28, 2013, 05:27:10 pm
The one minute change is designed to help you make quick changes between chords. Two or three
mistakes out of 20 isn't all that bad but if your not improving with less mistake then it's time to work
on your accuracy.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Kebas on December 27, 2013, 07:31:27 pm
Hi all,

I'm a 60 year old beginner, and like to learn playing guitar a little.
But I'm affraid I can't get the chord switches fast enough.
Trying the first lesson for 4 weeks now and I'm stuck with about 25 switches per minute.
Are there other finger exercises to do, to enhance my speed of chord changes?
And are there other people of my age struggling with this?

Kindly regards,
Jacob.
The Netherlands.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bradt on December 28, 2013, 01:23:30 am
25 complete changes (a-e-a)? If so, you're good for now. 20 of those should be plenty to move on. Look on the last lesson of this section. At the bottom of the page is a section on when to move on.

There are other lessons later on with new ways to practice chords. You'll get to them soon enough. Just don't get hung up on perfection. That could take a lifetime and a day. For now, basic proficiency is fine.

As stitch said, work on some of the songs. Not only are they helpful, but they are a good way to judge where you are. Up until you start getting into strum patterns, if you can play a couple of the songs with all down strums, then you're probably safe to go forward.

You'll get there!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Newand(hopefully)willing on December 28, 2013, 02:44:56 pm
Assuming you can do 50 single changes, or 25 D-E or D-A changes for example, you can certainly move on to stage 2. If anything, getting to know the 3 new chords will actually improve your old ones. That's how it went fo me at least.

Be sure to learn at least 1 song from the 1st stage though, or practice chord progression at a certain beat. If you have a metronome, you can try strumming one chord 4 times at 40bpm and then change to another without stopping, repeating the 4 down strums. Once you are comfortable at that speed you can increase it to 50 or 60 and so on.

Like i said, There's no use dwelling on stage 1 TOO MUCH, since you might very well get bored with your limited options. It gets more fun in stage 2!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: AcousticLounge on January 01, 2014, 06:32:33 pm
hey folks,

as others mentioned before, as soon as I do not watch my strumming hand, my speed of changing chords increase dramatically. But on the other hand, instead of strumming 4 strings with D and 5 with A, I do a lot of mistakes (sometimes 5 instead of 4, sometimes just all strings). But some of you said (as Justin did), it is all about speed here. So I hope, my way of practicing won't give me any bad habits in the future.

The comparison shows (1) looking to my strumming hand and (2) only concentrating on my fingers and chords.

             1     2
D to A   13   42
D to E   13   29
A to E   12   23
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Newand(hopefully)willing on January 01, 2014, 07:20:32 pm
People have said it a million times on this site, and it didn't do much for me either while i was only reading and not experiencing it myself, but...

You just need to practice.

Once you develop the muscle memory you won't need to look at anything. It will come naturally and you won't even notice it. As for strumming the right amount of strings, the answer is the same. It just... "clicks" after a while. Of course, you need to be mindful of the mistakes you are making while you are doing your changes, but hitting an extra string or one less string a couple of times isn't something you should worry over if you are aware of what you need to be doing.

By the time you get good at stage 2 you will make much less mistakes and wil be able to express yourself more freely.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Nygaard on January 07, 2014, 10:06:00 pm
How do you guys change from the minor to the major chords?

From D to D minor I can get a lot more changes moving my 1st finger between the 1st and the 2nd fret on the low E string rather than swapping finger positions and moving finger 1 to the anchor position mentioned in stage 1 - 2nd fret, G string. Same with A to A min.

Is this "cheating"? (Myself anyways)

Kind regards

Christian
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bradt on January 07, 2014, 10:30:04 pm
It's probably best to work on making the changes the way they are bing taught. As time goes on you'll find yourself making chords in loads of different ways, but for now it's more important to get your fingers used to the chord shapes as they are.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Drubbing on January 07, 2014, 10:45:41 pm
From D to D minor I can get a lot more changes moving my 1st finger between the 1st and the 2nd fret on the low E string rather than swapping finger positions and moving finger 1 to the anchor position mentioned in stage 1 - 2nd fret, G string. Same with A to A min.

Is this "cheating"? (Myself anyways)

Kind regards

Christian

Justin has suggested the chords to change to and from, for a reason. There will be far more songs that use the suggested chord changes, than simply doing majors and minors together because you find them easier.

You'll see the point of the suggested practice as you progress - it's not just about 'hitting numbers' as quickly as possible.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: mconnolly on January 24, 2014, 03:37:31 am
I am taking this slow and easy, and I am enjoying every painful moment (I am not a sadist!) of pressing my fingers on these coated metal stings.  I have been at this for 6 days, so I certainly do not expect any "magic" moments to occur.   However, I am having some difficulty with D major chord. The third finger continues to get in the way resulting sound when picking the first string and strumming the chord. 

At this point in the learning process, I am not pressuring too much on the time.  I have counted 12 transitions between D to A, then 15 transition on the next try. The quality of the D is obvious.  Any other suggestions are welcome.  :)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bradt on January 24, 2014, 03:56:13 am
It just takes time. Spend some time away from the one minute changes and work on this chord slowly.

One thing I would do is form the chord, then just pluck the individual strings until you have it right. Lift your fingers off and place them back down again. Try and mantain the shape and get it right straight away. It may take some work, but you'll get there.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: justinguitar on January 24, 2014, 08:34:38 am
Y'all checked out my free One Minute Changes app right ;)

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/one-minute-changes/id778908544?mt=8

Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: The Great OZ on January 30, 2014, 03:21:24 pm
This is my first time posting and am a total newbie to guitar playing and this site, but although I read how to post under the "Help" tab I couldn't find the "New Post" thingie that it talked about, so forgive me if I am posting this in the wrong place.

I have been practicing the the D, A, & E chords for about 3 weeks now, and the E is a piece of cake, the D seems to be coming around, getting it about 60% of the time, and it seems like everyone else I am having a really hard time with the A chord. My question is, should I move on to 1 minute changes even though I am still struggling mightily with the A chord, will that help or hurt? Thanks for all your help in advance.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: deadeye_ag on January 30, 2014, 05:21:48 pm
Hi,

You can start working on your one minute changes even if your D,E, and A chords don't ring out clearly 100% yet. If you look at Justin's stage 1 practice schedule he sets time aside for both practicing your chords (picking each string of a chord to make sure it is ringing out clearly) and changing between these chords (1-minute changes). A chord was a pain for me too. Are you using his suggested fingering or one of the others - the 1-2-3 fingering you see most of the time, or the mini-barre fingering? I found his preferred fingering was the magic combo that worked for me as my fingers are too fat to do the 1-2-3 way most people are taught.

In the end the 1-minute changes will help in that you are forming the chords more frequently so you get more practice with your chords, just be careful in that you aren't building bad hand placement into muscle memory. Hard to break a bad habit :)

One other tip that helped me, when any chord you are working on doesn't sound right, stop and figure out exactly which finger(s) are causing the problem. For the A-chord I have to make sure that first finger gets in under the other two fingers and close enough to the fret that it rings out properly. You can even simplify the chord to focus on just that problem finger(s) then add the other fingers back in after working on the problem.

In the end I've find that when I'm stuck on something related to guitar I just have to practice it over and over in small bursts and try and do it every day. 15 minutes 5-6 days a week is way better than 1-2 hours  on a weekend. That builds muscle memory, finger strength and flexibility. Then one day you'll wake up and practice and your fingers just do it! It's really weird and awesome when you have those moments!

Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: deadeye_ag on March 13, 2014, 07:14:06 pm
Even with tired fingers you can still work on guitar stuff. Here are some suggestions:

1) Work on the JUSTIN ear training he has at each stage, no guitar required.
2) Work on your strum patterns, just mute the strings with your fretting hand (Justin's RUST is worth the $$)
3) Listen to music, find the beat and work on foot tapping
4) Get Justin's Practice Music Theory for Guitar and start going over it, good stuff
5) Start learning the notes on the 5th and 6th strings

Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: zorner on April 09, 2014, 03:49:10 pm
When I'm changing chords I have a problem that if I look at the neck I'm making mistake in the struming(for example I strum 5 strings in D) and if I look at the body of the guitar I make mistakes in the chords. I know that it will be solved by time and practice, but where do you recommend to look, at the body or at the neck?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on April 09, 2014, 08:29:04 pm
To increase the accuracy of your strumming hand do the pick-strum-pick exercise.

Let's say you're having trouble hitting the D string in the D chord.
Pluck the D string then Strum the Chord repeat. Go slow at first and gradually speed up.
When you make a mistake stop and start over. Do this without looking at your strumming hand.
Do this every day for a few minutes and in a week or so your will hit that D string every time.
If you look at your hand to find the D string it will take you months to hit it every time.

Relying on your eyes when playing music only slows your progress because your brain will look for
the note then tell the fingers where to go. If you don't look at your fingers your finger will learn where
to go.
 
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Borodog on April 09, 2014, 09:34:13 pm
I respectfully disagree with that exercise. I would say, do the same exercise, but if you make a mistake picking the D, do not stop; look at your strumming picking hand for the next pick to make sure you hit the next pick or two, and then look away again. Do not stop under any circumstances. Stopping when you make a mistake trains you to stop when you make mistakes, which is much worse than picking the wrong note in a chord in my opinion.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on April 09, 2014, 11:49:28 pm
I agree that playing though mistakes when your playing is better than stopping but when you're practice
mistakes they become permanent so when practicing it's better not to practice mistakes. So stopping and
starting over I think is better.
Just my 2c
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bradt on April 10, 2014, 01:12:16 am
During the 1 minute changes I don't think you should stop and set things straight with another exercise. The exercise is meant to be played straight through, warts and all. So, here I am with Borodog.

However, I think playing through mistakes in a non performance setting is generally not the best practice as Stitch mentioned. If you are making consistent mistakes, it is a sign to slow down and really work on it. Otherwise it becomes part of your regular playing.

Look vs don't look? Look wherever and whenever you want. Just be sure to mind your posture and how you are holding the guitar. One day before you know it you'll suddenly notice that you've just been looking out the window while you were playing. It just starts to happen on its own.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on April 10, 2014, 02:00:40 am
Quote
You need those shapes in your fingers first. You can't get that without looking.

Drubbing I totally agree with you. You need to have these chords under your fingers. And until a beginner
has these shapes and chords under their finger I don't think they should be doing one minute changes.

If you watch the very first lesson Justin even says "It's really important to go thought this process many
many times before you go on and learn any more chords. This is way before he even teaches the one
minute changes. So if you can't play the chord what are you changing. Practicing wrong chords is not a
good idea so getting then under your finger first i think is more important.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Tim Mason on April 10, 2014, 07:27:46 am
My own experience tells me Stitch is right about this: I think I worked on the fast changes far too soon, and I have had to go back and relearn the early chords. But then some people have clever fingers while others have stupid fingers. Mine are very stupid - but we will get there in the end.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Jayrod on May 07, 2014, 11:56:35 am
As this is a test of pure fingerspeed and wrist movement, does it matter so much that the strings are creating noise between chords, I.e. not being muted somehow between? I feel even though I can hit the chord reliably, there is still this inherent messiness of string noise I between chords.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Borodog on May 07, 2014, 07:54:08 pm
It's not a test at all. You are training yourself to play sloppy. Practice makes permanent, not perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect. Slow down to the point where you can play cleanly and then work your way back up that way.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: TB-AV on May 07, 2014, 09:11:18 pm
As this is a test of pure fingerspeed and wrist movement,

It's a test of precision and repeatability with the stress of increasing speed applied.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bradt on May 08, 2014, 03:27:29 am
It's not a test at all. You are training yourself to play sloppy. Practice makes permanent, not perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect. Slow down to the point where you can play cleanly and then work your way back up that way.

Of course it is. In the course of one minute of a thirty minute practice session, you're not going to undo what you've learnt. It is a quantifiable way to gauge progress, and as TB pointed out, is a good way to condition yourself to play under stress. Besides, it's effective.

But yes Jayrod, as others said, don't sweat it too much. As with most things in guitar, time will sort out a lot of that, and you will pick up tricks along the way to sort out the rest. Just focus on getting the chords as clean as you can while playing quickly.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: misterg on June 06, 2014, 01:48:28 pm
I've watched the lesson several times, when I first learned the drill and whenever I was having problems or wanted to review. Nowhere does Justin suggest playing sloppy is ok.

If you make 35 changes, 30 were perfect or very nearly so, 3 were almost there but you missed a string or something, and two you completely flubbed, that's ok.

If you make 35 changes, five were perfect, 25 were ehhh almost there, and five you flubbed, that's not. Slow down. If you've got a looper pedal this is a perfect time to use it. Do your changes and then go back and listen to yourself: do your chord changes still sound as clean as you thought they were?

We tend to give ourselves a pass on things, especially something where it's hard to both DO and JUDGE at the same time. Your ears can't critically listen because your mind is too focused on making the changes properly. Playback can be a real eye opener.

See the practice schedule for this stage:
 
http://justinguitar.com/en/BC-119-PRACTICEstage1.php

About half way down the page under "Things To Remember":

"One Minute Changes

The object of this exercise is to get your fingers moving quickly. Although you should be trying to get the fingers in the perfect positions that you have been working on in your chord practice, if they are a little sloppy it is OK, we are working up the speed here!"

He also mentions in the lesson at about 3:00:

"Have the mindset that you're going really, really as quick as possible.
Now, you can't make the chords kinda rubbish, right?
If the fingers are on the wrong strings, you know, then it's kinda not right - or the wrong frets - but if the chord's not perfect, that's OK 'cause this exercise is about trying to get your fingers to move quickly. That's the point of it."


And in his introduction to the BC-115 lesson:

"The concept is simple: time yourself for one minute and see how many changes between two chords you can do in that time. This works better than any other method I have ever heard of. It's really quite astounding how well this trick works. I started teaching it as a game for kids, but have since applied it to anyone learning guitar and is one of the key lessons in the whole beginner's course..."

His method works on speed and accuracy separately. I'm sure other teachers have different approaches which also work, but IMHO your advice cuts across one of the key principles of *Justin's* method.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on June 06, 2014, 04:54:00 pm
The key words here are

 if they are a little sloppy it is OK, we are working up the speed here!
From what I've read on this forum most beginners miss the word Little and read the word Sloppy
If you practice Sloppy you will be Sloppy. I think this is why so many beginners can't do the chord
changes when they try and play songs.
They can change a Sloppy 120 changes per minute but can't do One clean change every 4 beats.
They get obsessed with the numbers and forget about why they're learning fast changes in the first
place.

Now, you can't make the chords kinda rubbish
Seen Can't is another word they miss when reading.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: vedderfan94 on August 24, 2014, 06:50:21 pm
I'm now up to 78 changes for D-A, 61 for D-E and 79 for A-E. However, I struggle even with the simplest Stage 1 songs, like Hound Dog. For some reason changing from E to D is the change I find hardest (much better at D to E) and so even slowing down Hound Dog I can't change fast enough after the single bar of E chords. Any tips? Other changes feel much smoother because I can move the second and third fingers onto the required frets pretty much at the same time but for E to D it's still the motion of second finger THEN middle finger and when I try to play at a faster rate my third finger will land on the wrong fret sometimes or the chord just sounds horrible :/

Not sure if I should move onto stage 2 yet because of this
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on August 24, 2014, 07:00:03 pm
Start slow and change from E to D pause then E to D pause. You've trained your fingers to change from
D to E  so you need to get it changing in reverse. Start off slowly and speed up as you improve.
It's kind of like the one minute change but your putting your focus on E to D
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: pt3r on August 27, 2014, 11:58:25 am
Hello everybody, brand new visitor to the forum.
I bought my first accoustic guitar about one week ago, and stumbled on to a video of justin showing how to play a G chord without breaking your fingers. I was so impressed with the way Justin addresses the viewer and the way he explains his stuff.
So I head over to the website and started the beginners course, one week later my fingertips are hurting but I am able to play the A E D and Am Dm and Em chords.
The one minute changes are a whole different ballgame though; the moment I try to follow a metronome my fingering is all over the place, I have forgotten the chordshapes and strum all the wrong chords.

My biggest question for the moment is must I really be able to do 60 D-A D-E and E-A changes in a minute before I can even consider to have a go at the 3 little birds song or is it ok to use the song as another way to get my chord changes practiced in a less overpowering way?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Drubbing on August 27, 2014, 12:06:26 pm
Slow down. It's been a week. You're not going to get to 60 by next week. Get the chords first, then do the 1 minute exercise and build up through practice. I'd forget the metronome for now, you're going to chase it and fail. It's there for helping with timing, not hitting numbers.

You can certainly try 3LB slowly. It's never to early to try simple songs.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: shadowscott007 on August 27, 2014, 12:10:47 pm
No, don't wait; go ahead and give the song a try.  For one minute changes lose the metronome, not the point at all.  For the song get familiar with it, then start using the metronome but set it slow enough to get the changes and gradually bring up the speed.

One minute changes aren't there as a "stop and master before proceeding" exercise.  They are a focused exercise there to help you get your changes faster to support making said chord changes in a song.  It is an addition to your routine to help you learn to make changes in songs, not a replacement for learning songs


Go a head and work on the song as part of your practice routine along with one minute changes.  Both learning songs and one minute changes help you learn to make changes.  One is specific one is generic.

Shadow

 
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: pt3r on August 27, 2014, 03:42:11 pm
Is there a link to these recommendations? I have been quite overwhelmed by the amount of extremely useful information so far, i feel a bit like a kid let loose in a toy store; some much stuff to look at so many things to try   ;D
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: fabi on August 27, 2014, 04:54:01 pm
This is the last lesson in stage 1.

 http://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-119-PRACTICEstage1.php (http://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-119-PRACTICEstage1.php)

Scroll to the bottom of the page and you'll see Justin's recommendations and suggestions for this stage.

Quote
•   You should know all the chords from this stage—D, A and E—from memory.
•   You should have them sounding good (if not perfect), with most of the notes sounding out most of the time.
• You should have your One-Minute changes down to at least 20 changes in a minute.
• You should be able to play one or two of the songs from the songbook, even if you have to start and stop a little bit here and there.

HTH
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: fabi on August 28, 2014, 12:02:39 am
Lol Justin cautions us against waiting for perfection before moving on to the next stage (as well as against moving on while our playing is still a basic mess in the stage)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: shadowscott007 on August 28, 2014, 01:16:15 am
Exercises are just that exercises that intensly focus on particular techniques.  Playing means playing songs.  Exercises help you improve playing songs faster.  The point is the music, not the exercises.

Just like sports.  You run, you lift weights.  But you still play the game, you don't say I have to wait until I can bench press 300 pounds or make a 6 minute mile before you start playing football soccer baseball rugby whatever.

Guitar is the same, you don't wait until you can get 60 changes per minute or do 16th notes at 120bpm before you start playing songs. 

Shadow
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: vedderfan94 on September 07, 2014, 11:18:02 pm
I've almost completed Stage 2 now. For my 1 minute changes I've been doing the 4 new changes as well as continuing practicing the 3 changes (D-A, D-E, A-E) from Stage 1 and I'm up to almost 100 changes/min on the latter 3. Should I stop doing these now? Obviously once I get to Stage 3 chord changes it'll become a bit much to do all the different one minute changes but I was a bit worried about my ability at switching between the first 3 chords decreasing. Will I be ok practicing these just using stage 1 songs? Thanks for any advice :)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: fabi on September 07, 2014, 11:40:45 pm
Vedderfan, I have my chords up to stage 4 but my songs on stage 2.  I'm not going any further 'till my songs catch up.  When my changes got over 60 bpm I relegated practice on them to once a week or so while I added new chords.  Just be careful of getting into the same mess I'm in.  Those 1-minute changes are a means to play music.  In and of themselves they don't amount to "playing".  So make sure you apply your newly fast changes to songs at the correct tempo.  <--- just friendly advise ;-)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: tatjoker on January 09, 2015, 05:30:28 am
Hello! Absolute beginner here, learned my first chord on Christmas. I've been practicing every day since, anywhere from 15 minutes to an hour, with the exception of one day I took off because my wrist was sore (due to sitting cross legged on the couch instead of upright in a chair... I think... I'm working on better posture!). My one minute changes (counting each time I play a chord as a change) as of tonight are A-E 39, D-E 38, and A-D 45. I was having a lot of trouble with both transitions to/from D, or just a hard time with D in general, a few days ago, then took a day off and the next day suddenly I jumped past 40 for A-D and could do it without looking at my fretting hand! I don't know what happened, but it was super encouraging.

My first question is how many one minute changes should I be doing each time I practice? After I first started this lesson my practice consisted of strum/pick/strum each chord a few times to make sure they sound good, then 15-20 minutes of one minute changes (5-6 individual one minute changes per chord pair) and then some more strum/pick/strum. Is that overkill? I jumped ahead to peek at what Justin's suggested practice schedule is and he only has one one minute change per chord pair per practice session.

My second question is... and maybe this isn't the right thread... but, my fingers are past the point of pain, definitely building up callouses, but I have consistently numb fingertips. At first this was great because my fingers no longer hurt when I practiced! But recently it seems to be tripping me up, as sometimes, especially when playing D chord, I can't feel my middle and ring fingers pressing down on the strings. More and more with each change I naturally don't look at my fretting hand as much, but it gets frustrating when I'm not looking, but can't feel the string with my finger, and I get flustered because I don't want to strum if I don't have my fingering right, and so I mess up either the strumming or I lose concentration and mess up my fretting fingers too. So I guess, does the numbness go away eventually? Or am I doomed to always have numb fingertips in addition to callouses?

Hope my questions make sense, sorry if they are kind of long winded. Thanks! :)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Buckeye1971 on January 09, 2015, 02:31:00 pm
Hello tatjoker and welcome to the forum,
I suppose you can do as many one minute changes as you like. Just don't do them to the point of boredom or frustration. practice some songs from Justin's beginner songbook to switch it up.
As far as your fingers go, as long as you are not in pain go ahead and keep playing. Sore is ok, painful you should stop. As far as not looking goes, don't worry about it. If you need to look it's ok. Even the greatest guitarists in the world occasionally have to look. :)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on January 09, 2015, 05:00:29 pm
Welcome to the forum tatjoker
Justin has a practice schedule for each stage to help you get a routine going. It's the last lesson of every
stage.
http://justinguitar.com/en/BC-119-PRACTICEstage1.php

He also as a couple of pages you can print out to help you keep track of your progress.
The practice ones are the last two. The one hour one is for when you can handle practicing for an
hour or more. The other print outs come in handy for other lessons in the Course.

http://justinguitar.com/en/PA-000-BlankPaper.php
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: SiegeFrog on January 15, 2015, 07:13:14 am
I seem to remember experiencing numbness when I first started. It did eventually go away. In my case, I think it was from overdoing it. Both pressing too hard on the strings and practicing too long. There is a point of diminishing returns with doing 1 minute changes forever. At some point, you got to switch to trying to do the Stage 1 songs. That will be easier on your fingers than 1 minute changes again.

Also, I think of each stage as a unit. So I watch all the videos for each stage (especially the last one where Justin details the practice schedule for that stage), then I start the practice routine for that stage. Some stages may take a couple of weeks. Others a couple of months. As a stage 1 player, make sure you watch all the stage 1 videos, so you know what to practice and how long.

I believe that somewhere Justin recommends that if you want to practice more than you should start the practice routine all over again from the beginning instead of getting stuck on one phase for a half an hour.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Zenxy on January 20, 2015, 02:56:36 am
Hey absolute beginner here. Started the course about a week ago and started doing one minute changes for about 3 days. I find it extremely difficult. At the moment I'm around DA:22 DE:15 AE: 10 ish. However I just can't seem to find a way to get past these numbers. Should I count chords when I have all my fingers on the right fret but didn't press hard enough and when strummed it doesn't produce a sound? Any general advice regarding one minute changes will be greatly appreciated. Also, at what number should I start the next lesson ?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: misterg on January 20, 2015, 04:59:48 pm
Any general advice regarding one minute changes will be greatly appreciated. Also, at what number should I start the next lesson ?

Hi and welcome! :)

General advice: Just keep going!

Those numbers look pretty good for 3 days, but don't cheat yourself.

If you've got the time and enthusiasm for the next lesson, then get stuck in now but also keep doing your current practice routine until you've met all the goals.

Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: muskan on January 25, 2015, 11:38:26 am
I am on the first change D-A and trying to get speed but the problem is when I pull my fingers from the strings they give a little buzz in between and if I slow down they sounds right. Is it okay (that I really doubt )or what is problem I have no idea how to work on that buzz to remove it and then speed up.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: planetoi on January 30, 2015, 06:50:37 am
I hope this hasn't already been answered, but I don't really feel like scrolling through 20 pages so hopefully I'm okay.

Anyway, I can do chord changes decently fast, but my chords are sooo sloppy when I do it, it sounds absolutely terrible. I can play the chords well enough, but when I'm trying to do it quickly it's just awful.

What should I do? Should I press on and go as fast as I can and hope my fingers get a little more nimble as I progress, or should I slow it down a bit so the chords sound good?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on January 30, 2015, 04:36:56 pm
Sloppy chord changes don't count you only count clean changes.
If you practice sloppy changes you are learning sloppy changes
Practice make permanent not perfect so slow down and do them
correctly you'll improve faster.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Setneck Tele USA on January 30, 2015, 05:09:12 pm
That's why I'm not a fan of 1 minute changes.  Too many people get caught up in how many can you do.

But Justin doesn't recommend them in the manner some people take it.  They are only to be used once you can make chords perfectly.  You have to start slowly.  If that means you only do 5 chord changes in a minute then you only do 5 in a minute.  Justin constantly mentions going slowly at first on everything.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: shadowscott007 on January 30, 2015, 10:18:37 pm
Watch the lesson.

Justin says they don't have to be perfect; but they can't be complete crap either.

I understand the usefulness of the tool and still use it when I am having trouble with a new chord grip(s) and transitions to and from it (them).

But I think people get WAY WAY WAY too worried about it as a stand alone thing to be conquered.  It ceases to be a tool and becomes a goal in and of itself.  It is a GREAT tool and a CRAPPY goal.

Shadow
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: m_c on February 04, 2015, 12:13:53 am
One tip I think worth mentioning, is when I do 1 minute changes, is I always spend a few minutes either playing some songs I already know, or run through some chord sequences, just to get warmed up.

I'd still do the finger stretching, especially if you're struggling with the stretch for the chords, but I always found doing a few minutes of regular chord changes improved my minute changes.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Tomen8r on February 19, 2015, 01:54:16 am
I've been banging away for 6 weeks or so, with noticeable improvements. I set up a spreadsheet for the 1mm changes, tracking improvements. But I have issues..

My left hand is my catching hand for baseball/softball and hockey. All fingers have been broken 1 or more times. I have big hands/long fingers, but they are all pointing in the wrong direction!!!  And in different directions. My right hand, strumming hand, has perfectly straight fingers. Mangled fingers make it easy for some chords but difficult for others. The A chord, for example, is almost impossible. I"ve tried the beginner A chord on a folk and acoustic guitar (different necks) and it is a big struggle. And I've practiced that chord so much more than the others but I can't fit three bent fingers in that tiny space. I know there will be other ways to get the A chord. But I am thinking of starting over, left handed!  I've tried it a couple times, simply flipping guitar over (strings upside down) and I definitely have better control and chord strikes. But it is day 1 all over again left handed! 

Anyone else go through this? I will most likely stay the course playing right handed, keep plugging away. It's only been 6 weeks.  Who knows. Maybe I'll learn both ways. 2 guitars strung opposite each other. I am "amphibious" like that.  ;-)) 
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Accidia on February 20, 2015, 08:56:04 pm
Hi, this is mi 1st post here.

I started just one month ago, 37 and never did anything related to music... and I'm about finishing (I think) 2nd stage of the begginers course and today I reached my first 60 changes (actually 64) on the 1 minute changes with the A-E chord change!!!!!  ;D ;D ;D ;D

On the other hand the changes with Dm that I'm doing (Dm-A and Dm-Am) I'm around 25 :(
Actually I'm struggling with the Dm chord also.

My question is: Justin tell us to practice what we cannot do... so yes, I have to practice Dm chord and changes Ok. But, do I have to practice the A-E changes? Or maybe is better I keep it practising them but focusing in the "quality" of the change?

BTW my other changes are around 40-50, so should I change to stage 3 or do I keep practising until improves my Dm?

Thanks!!!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on February 20, 2015, 09:03:00 pm
At this stage of your playing you keep practicing everything you can fit into the time you have to
practice.
So if you can practice all you've learnt so far with out running out of time then keep doing that.
If you are pressed for time practice the things you have the most trouble with first then the other
things in your remaining time.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: RaymondR on February 22, 2015, 05:20:55 am
Hey guys, relatively new/beginner here. I'm not sure where exactly to post this question, but I've BC-154 the one minute changes for stage 5. My question is that Justin mentions that all my one minute changes at that point should be 60 (or rather 30) does that count for every possible combination of chord? or only the difficult ones like C - G and vice versa?

Edit: Should I be practicing every possible combination of chord? I know it sounds absurd but I'm sure that sooner or later you'll have to know all the changes or be comfortable with them.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: misterg on February 22, 2015, 08:52:33 pm
Should I be practicing every possible combination of chord?

Hi, and welcome! :)

Short answer is no - do the combinations that Justin gives in the various lessons (they have been chosen for a reason). If there are any other combinations that crop up in songs that you play (or would like to play), which you find awkward, then you can put them in, too.

When you can get to 60 (or 30) reliably, then drop that combination and use the time to practice something else.

Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: m_c on February 22, 2015, 09:00:18 pm
For stage 5, Justin doesn't specify any combinations, it's up to you to select 5 combinations to work on.

Personally, as I progressed through the stages, I didn't stop practising any combination until I managed 60 changes per minute. If there was a particular chord change from the previous stage I was still struggling with, I'd keep that on my list of 5 into the next stage practise, and then pick random combinations using the next stage chords to get my 5 combinations for practise. Once any change got up to 60 changes, I'd score it off and add a new combination.
Some combinations I picked because I was struggling with them in certain songs, others were just a random selection I hadn't already done.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Lovenow on February 25, 2015, 11:08:08 pm
I'm sure this gets asked often, and I did search but didn't find the answer. When Justin introduces the idea of 1m changes, he gives 2 ways of counting. He says he planned to count 1 cycle as one count, but that it's ok, in fact it's probably  better idea to make each chord count as one (each cycle count as two). BC115 about 4 minutes in.  He says the goal is 30 complete changes eventually (meaning 60 chords). No problem there. Now on BC129 'Should I Move On' he states you should have your one-minute changes down to 30 in a minute. So the question is, is that 30 complete changes, or 15 complete changes. It's not clear because he's introduced both ways and isn't specific at that point. I would think that 30 complete changes is pretty ambitious at this point, so I wonder if he means 30 chord changes, in other words 15 complete. I mean, I'm in beginner stage 2. The idea of being able to switch between Dm and A for 30 complete, seems like it would be easier to fly to the moon in my car. Thanks in advance.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: tobyjenner on February 25, 2015, 11:15:31 pm
Lovenow

To keep it simple, one changes is for example A to D or A to E or D to E. Aim for 30 of theses at Stage 1.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Zapped on March 06, 2015, 12:40:50 pm

BC115 about 4 minutes in.  He says the goal is 30 complete changes eventually (meaning 60 chords). No problem there. Now on BC129 'Should I Move On' he states you should have your one-minute changes down to 30 in a minute.
:
So the question is, is that 30 complete changes, or 15 complete changes.
:
I would think that 30 complete changes is pretty ambitious at this point, so I wonder if he means 30 chord changes, in other words 15 complete. I mean, I'm in beginner stage 2. The idea of being able to switch between Dm and A for 30 complete, seems like it would be easier to fly to the moon in my car.

As you said, at about 4 minutes into the BC115 video Justin is unambiguous. A "change" is two chords, so a goal of  "30 complete changes" in one minute is 60 chords total. If you instead find it easier to count each chord separately, that's fine, but to reach your goal in that case you count to 60. A recording of two people who are exactly meeting the goal would sound identical, even though one musician might say he meet his goal of 30 and the other say she met her goal of 60.

Playing the chords

    A  D  A  D  A  D  A  D

makes 4 complete changes, or 8 chord changes. Now if you really look at it you've only changed chords 7 times in that sequence, but most players return to the initial chord A to make the 8th chord change. I don't write a final A chord at the end because folks will just argue about whether that makes it 4-1/2 complete changes, and that's silly. When you're playing N complete changes per minute, and N is a large number, that final return to the first chord isn't worth talking about.

If you think 15 complete changes per minute is doable and 30 complete changes would be more difficult than driving to the moon in your car, as you put it, you need to set your metronome at a speed you're comfortable with and advance it just a little every day or so as you become comfortable with a new slightly faster tempo.

Now I personally think it's tough for a beginner to "lock on" to a slow metronome tempo. At some risk of making this more confusing, if I could play 15 complete changes per minute, meaning 30 chords per minute, I wouldn't set my metronome at 15 or at 30. I'd set it to 60bpm (beats per minute), tap my foot to that 60bpm tempo, and just change chords every 2nd beat.  That is exactly the same as "15 complete changes per minute".

Then in a single practice session I would try to move up from 60bpm (a new chord every other metronome tick/beat) to 64, to 68, to 72 until it all fell apart. Do a minute at 60bpm, then a minute at 64, etc. After it falls apart, I would drop back to 60, make sure that 60bpm still felt easy peasy, and try to push the tempo up again.

Next practice session 64bpm (i.e. 16 complete changes per minute) might feel easy.  Or you might plateau and be unable to get faster for a day or two. But after a week or so you should definitely look back and wonder how 15 complete changes per minute ever felt difficult. And eventually you'll get to your goal of 30 complete changes per minute, aka 60 chord changes per minute, aka 120bpm with chord changes every other beat.

Crank up that metronome, tap that foot, and keep practicing!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on March 06, 2015, 04:51:50 pm
Zapped I have to correct you on this.

This is a Quote From Justin's Lesson Page
Quote
Use the practice schedule (we'll look at this more in BC-119) and write down how many times you make the change each session. You will find that being able to watch your progress will really help keep you motivated. Count ‘1' for each change; so D–A–D–A = four changes.

When he explain the change as being 2 chords he starts telling the story of how he came up with
this exercise and state he use to have his student count the two chords as a full change.

Watch this video a the 2 minute mark where Justin is counting the changes he counts every chord
To do 30 changes and play 60 chords you would have to play A-D D-A A-D D-A and that is not what Justin
is doing. He is playing ADADADAD  Justin should edit everything he says from 3:16 second on. This is what
confuses every body and is irrelevant to the lesson. Up until that point in the lesson it is crystal clear
how to count the One Minute Change.




Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Zapped on March 09, 2015, 07:10:01 pm
Zapped I have to correct you on this.
:
Watch this video a the 2 minute mark where Justin is counting the changes he counts every chord
To do 30 changes and play 60 chords you would have to play A-D D-A A-D D-A and that is not what Justin
is doing. He is playing ADADADAD  Justin should edit everything he says from 3:16 second on. This is what
confuses every body and is irrelevant to the lesson. Up until that point in the lesson it is crystal clear
how to count the One Minute Change.






Hi stitch - I don't mind being corrected at all, but you'll have quote my previous reply and tell me where I'm disagreeing with BC-115. The 8 chords I wrote about in my reply, which can either be counted as 4 complete changes or 8 chord changes, are exactly what Justin was talking about at the 3m16s mark you mentioned.

I didn't think anyone ever suggested counting what you wrote ( A-D D-A A-D D-A ), since what you wrote has the student striking each chord twice. Justin never demos it that way in his video so I don't know where you're getting it from. You wrote (correctly) what Justin plays in the video ( "He is playing ADADADAD" ) which happens to be the exact 8-chord, 4-complete-changes example in my earlier reply.

Where do we (or Justin & I) disagree exactly? That's not my intent.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: KasperFauerby on March 10, 2015, 09:19:33 am
Here is a thing to consider - it doesn't matter how you count it ;)

Doing exercises against a clock or metronome is a way for you to keep track of your own progress, so as long as you count the same way every time you practice you'll be ok. Do the exercise, write down your results and see how the number increases over time.

Your chord changes are fast enough when you're no longer struggling to play the songs you want to play.

Not trying to dismiss anyone's point of view here, only trying to offer some advice that might clear up the confusion for some..
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: pt3r on March 10, 2015, 09:43:12 am
I can only agree, you need to get as fluent as suits your playing, this said, don't fool yourself by lowering your requirements when playing a song. If you play it (too) slow to justify your troublesome chord changes then be honest enough with yourself to keep on grinding on those changes. You will thank yourself later for sticking with it. Said the guy who still struggles making clean changes to and from the B7 chord.  ;D
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on March 10, 2015, 03:35:52 pm
You are correct it doesn't matter how you count or keep track of your progress.
But it does matter when you need help or ask questions when having trouble.

Having two ways of counting the one minute change is confusing to beginners and
the people trying to help them. You need to remember the people who are on lesson
BC 115 have most likely just started playing. It is after all the 5th lesson of stage 1.

This is one of the most common question on the forum and people don't get clear answers
or they get conflicting answers.
Justin explains it very well on the first part of the video and he should leave it at that.
Like you said it doesn't matter how you count so why not just have one simple easy to
understand way for everyone?





 
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: aakudaku on April 05, 2015, 12:39:29 am
Hi I'm a newbie as well and I had a question. When I'm changing between chords (say A to D to A), the sound from my previous chord is still playing when I go to my new chord. I see in the video that somehow Justin is able to stop the sound from his previous chord from playing when he switches to the next chord. How does he do that? And also, when I keep my anchor finger on the string between chords, it drags on it and makes a high-pitched screech sound. How do I prevent that?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: mike42 on April 05, 2015, 01:09:55 am
Hi aakudaku,

Welcome to the forum. There are many different ways to mute the strings using either your left or right hand, but at this point I wouldn't worry too much about all of that. It can be tricky and is covered later on, so right now just worry about getting those notes fretted cleanly.

When you say the sound is still playing, is it only the open string (5th string if you're playing A, 4th for D) or do all the strings ring out when you lift your fingers off? If it's only the one string, that's fine and you can hear it in Justin's video. If it's all the strings, you can focus on lifting your fingers cleanly to avoid them all starting to ring out.

To answer your 2nd question, you are probably still pressing down on that string when you change, correct? If you're applying pressure & your finger slides a bit, it'll cause that squeak. If you want to avoid it, let up on the pressure a bit when making the change.

I wouldn't suggest trying to incorporate these techniques into the 1 minute changes right away. Focus on making the changes very slowly to get the technique correct, and once you get it down try to apply them to this exercise. Since the point of the exercise is to improve speed, trying to apply a new skill without practicing it first will slow you down and likely cause some frustration.

Hope this helps!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: shadowscott007 on April 05, 2015, 01:12:06 am
Later on in the courses you will learn about string muting and keeping unwanted string ringing from happening.  At this stage I wouldn't worry too much about it.

For now I would focus on targeting the strings you want to play, 4 for the D, 5 for the A and 6 for the E.

As far as the squeak goes, slightly relax you finger as you shift it.  Again that is a subtly that will develop as you progress.

Shadow
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: aakudaku on April 05, 2015, 01:31:00 am
Thanks, that explains it! Also, I had another question. Currently, whenever I try to do one-minute changes, I am forced to turn my head from my fretting hand to my strumming hand to make sure I'm doing each correctly. Is there any exercise to learn how to only strum the strings you need for a certain chord? For instance, I am looking at the fretboard and make a D chord, and then I have to look at the strumming hand to make sure I only get the lower 4 strings, etc. That makes me quite a bit slower.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: CRaZY BiTS on June 15, 2015, 11:47:57 am
Hi there, I've been practicing guitar for a week and I'm struggling @ 1-minute changes. I'm picking up wrong strings and unclear notes. But I'm get pace as fast as 20. Please Help!!!!!!!!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Boobook on June 15, 2015, 12:12:21 pm
 Hi Crazy bits,

Slow down and concentrate on placing your fingers  correctly before pushing too fast on the one min changes. Yes it's about speed, but accuracy is more important. In one week of playing your fingers are still trying to work out what on earth you're asking them to do, let alone do it fast. Take your time, build the muscle memory and patterns first, then the speed will come.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on June 15, 2015, 04:13:38 pm
Try practicing one chord. Play any chord lift your fingers off put them back and play it again.
When you can do this with out missing any notes try taking your hand off the neck then place
it back to play the chord. When you can do this with no mistakes try taking your hands completely
off and touch your knee then back on and play the chord.

Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: iChow on July 26, 2015, 09:47:26 pm
Hi, I've been playing for a week or so and learnt the A, D, and E chord. My chords from best to worst would be A, E, and then D. A chord I could do the strum-pick out-strum thing without any adjustments. E chord requires a bit of adjustment every time while D chord takes me a while to do the strum-pick out-strum thing. I was just wondering when should I progress to the 1 minute changes? Even if I progress should I only try to change between the chords I am comfortable with (A and E) or should I learn to switch between all the chords at once?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: hilts17 on August 21, 2015, 03:07:31 pm
I was curious how people practised 1 minute changes with the F chord. I've just recently nailed the F chord and have incorporated it into my 1 min changes. My first attempt using the big F chord was sad. Anywhere from 12-15 depending on the other paired chord. All my other 1 min changes are up @ 60. Then I tried using the little F and right away I doubled my count to well over 20. Last night I did a few more than that. Then I went back to the big F and the count dropped by a lot again.

How did you practise F chord changes? Mix it up with big and little F or did you concentrate on one or the other first?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Tobsen on August 21, 2015, 03:25:13 pm
Little F came easy and I just incorporated it into my 1 minute changes excercise. For the F barre however I focused more on accuracy for at least 1 month and practised it really slow until I was finally able to air change it to C, Am, G, D and E. Now it's in my 1 minute change routine and I'm seeing nice progress.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: SiegeFrog on August 22, 2015, 08:38:28 pm
For F, I started with the barre chord version. However, I started it in Stage 3. I was really worried about it, so I just added it to my 5 minute strum-pick out-strum daily routine. It was horrible at first, but after about a month I was pretty consistent on all six strings. Then when I was at Stage 4, I started trying some changes with it. Again, very slow at first, I wasn't really doing 1-minute changes as usual, just slowly seeing how my fingers had too move to effect the change for a minute or so. Still no pressure, because I wasn't using it. By the time I got to Stage 6, I was pretty confident with most of my suggested F changes (approx. 50 changes a minute), so I started trying to use it in songs (Hurt, DOA). That was pretty challenging, but only a little harder than other changes. I remember the first time I was able to air change between Am, F and C for Hurt was a milestone for me. In the end, I got F to work because I started early with it and didn't try to use it in a song until I had practiced it for 3 months.

I will say that I have struggled with the small F some, but it's coming. Also, I've recently started with the acoustic. I'm better at the electric, but it's coming too. Patience and perseverance.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: kvp1987 on September 21, 2015, 03:42:49 pm
Hi,

I have been practicing for 1 month and my problem is I am not able to change to D chord from E or A. I have no difficulty changing between E&A but for D I cannot do quickly. When I change to D chord my anchor finger stays on G string but my second finger comes on E string first then my third finger on B string. I cannot get both fingers together. :( :(
Any Help?



 
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: tobyjenner on September 21, 2015, 11:13:27 pm
Kvp

Don't worry about the speed for now as you've only been playing a short time. And don't worry about the fingers coming down one at a time and not altogether. All of this will improve with time and practice, you just need to keep on practicing. Justin introduces a method called Air Changes in Stage 5 where you for the shape of the chord 'in the air' so your fingers are in place before they touch the strings and this will certainly help your changes.

For now just keep working away and it will get better.

Toby
 8)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: xyzzyfl on September 23, 2015, 08:41:58 pm
Was wondering how long you recommend practicing on the one minute changes. I'm using Justin's One Minute Changes application on my iPhone and been working on chord changes for about 30 minutes at a time every other day. There are so many chord changes just using the most common chords, I can't get through them all and I'm feeling like I should be spending even more time on this instead of working on the other important practice suggestions. I know his practice schedule says 5 minutes on chord changes but that's not enough to get through hardly any chords.

What do you guys do regarding practice time on chord changes?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: SiegeFrog on September 23, 2015, 10:18:38 pm
First, make sure you get all the suggested changes for that stage. Justin has recommended them for a reason. If you try to master all possible changes then that will take forever; you have other things to practice. 5-10 minutes per practice session seems about right. After the suggested ones, look for changes that appear in songs you are learning or considering learning. You'll need them.

When I was in the BC, I took the Beginner's Songbook and recorded all the possible changes from every song in the book. It took about 10 minutes to tabulate. Then I concentrated on those, especially ones that occurred in songs I was considering. If I had understood keys better then, I probably could've made a comparable list myself, but I didn't. There are just some changes that are less likely to occur. Of course, for consolidation, Justin says you need to be able to change between any two chords 60 times in a minute, but I don't think I would bother to practice that. If you can change E to B7, then you can probably do Em to B7 as well, etc.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: gwest40 on October 25, 2015, 03:11:54 pm
I have a slightly different method for the 1 Minute Changes (D to A, D to E, E to A).  I started off on a Saturday, and timed/counted my D-A, D-E, E-A changes.  Next day, I practice 30 minutes: 10 minutes each D-A, D-E, E-A, but I don't time it or count the number of changes.  Instead, I just concentrate on producing really good chords.  No buzzing, strumming the strings that should be strummed and no more, seeing if I can produce the chord without looking at the fret board.  I do this every day for a week.  Come Saturday, I do the timing/count my changes to see how far I've come.  So far: D-A: 49, D-E: 47, E-A: 58.  I still have a ways to go.  At 52, I have patience, and I am under no illusion that I will be the next Slash!  Keep in mind, LOTS of people play guitar; obviously, some better than others.  It takes time, but it can't be impossible if so many people can do it. 
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Ewi7 on November 10, 2015, 12:42:18 pm
Hey there, I used to to learn Begginers Stage 2 for the last 10 days every day half an hour.
So I when i got my chords i wanted to play "3 little birds" and "i walk the line".
My Problem now is, and this is very annoying in the 1 minute chord changing from E to A,
that the thin e String is always swinging with, when a change the Chord. This sounds realy disturbing.
I dont know if it's bad strumming or do i have to mute the string? The Guitar is tuned.

Thank you very much!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: mike42 on November 11, 2015, 12:10:52 am
Shouldn't be a problem letting the high E ring out. At only 10 days in you should be focusing on finger placement and getting those chords ringing cleanly. In most situations you won't mute the high E when changing between open E and A chords.

Hope this helps!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Joerfe on November 11, 2015, 06:11:47 pm
I sometimes get that e string ringing too. Be careful not to tilt the guitar towards you while playing. I understand that as a beginner it is easier to see the fretboard and finger positions when tilting the guitar a bit, but it is a bad habit and can lead to the e string being plucked too hard.


/Jesper
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Sky_diver on November 27, 2015, 09:41:27 am
I'm just ending my 3rd week, and I have a 4 half hour practice sessions per day. I'm 54 and haven't pick up any instrument since I was about 15, and to make matters worse...I cut my thumb off my left hand at the first knuckle about 10 years back!

What I have found is that I can get about 20 - 30 changes  / minute, but to be honest, some of the chords sound pretty crappy. So, I have focused on getting clean changes, rather than fast changes. I can't play the songs because the changes are too slow, but they ARE clean.....so I'm happy about that.

I have added the Am chord (naughty me) because it's so close to the E chord that it adds to my repertoire to keep things interesting.

Every now and then I keep getting a 'Eureka' moment, when all the chords, in a random order sound great for about 20 changes with no mistakes at all. I don't know why or when these moments come, but I just had another one tonight where  my fingers are landing on the A, E and Am chords together....or very nearly together. D chord is not quite there yet, but I'm sure it will be before too long.

Anyway, I just went through the 1 minute changes and I now average 22 changes / minute and all the changes give me lovely clear chords.

So....as I come from a skydiving and motorcycle racing background, I have a motto of 'Slow is smooth...smooth is fast'.....and it fits in with the guitar just perfectly.....and I'm really enjoying this....
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Joerfe on November 27, 2015, 01:16:30 pm
Welcome on board Sky_Diver!
That is quite a change in hobbies and luckily your shorter left hand thumb isn't the worst part to miss when playing the guitar (My guess is that your left hand is your fretting hand...)
It sounds like you are well on track and I like the fact that you take it slow and work on your precision. The speedy changes will come as you progress. Have fun in this beautiful world and do not forget to show off your progress in the Audio and Video of You Playing thread. It is also a great way for yourself to keep track of your progress and you'll get great feedback should you ask for it.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: shadowscott007 on November 29, 2015, 12:48:28 am
I believe in the first one minute changes video Justin says something to the effect of "they can't be complete rubbish but they don't have to be perfect either" as well as an example...
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: SiegeFrog on November 29, 2015, 08:14:38 am
@Sky_diver

This is of course up to you, but it doesn't sound like you're doing the exercise as intended. My goal is usually 90-95%, and I don't count the bad ones. If I do 65 in a minute, and 4 of them are less than perfect, I consider that a success. Maybe tomorrow, only 2 of them will be less than perfect. If I do 80 in a minute, and 25 of them are crappy then I slow down. The goal of the exercise is speed, not perfection. I think of the strum/pick out/strum exercise as the time to really perfect each chord.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: tobyjenner on November 29, 2015, 05:11:57 pm
I believe in the first one minute changes video Justin says something to the effect of "they can't be complete rubbish but they don't have to be perfect either" as well as an example...

From BC 119 ............

"One Minute Changes

The object of this exercise is to get your fingers moving quickly. Although you should be trying to get the fingers in the perfect positions that you have been working on in your chord practice, if they are a little sloppy it is OK, we are working up the speed here!

The important thing here is to practise the chord changes that you struggle with the most. In your practice schedule you should write in the amount of changes that you made in that practice session. Make sure you use your timer, and push yourself to go as fast as possible."

The accuracy will come from the pick / strum exercises, so don't worry too much at this stage if you miss the odd one. If they're all 'rubbish' back off and build the speed up again.

Use a metronome that can be programmed, to increase speed, as this will push you until the wheels fall off. 
 8)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: m_c on November 29, 2015, 09:56:19 pm
One thing I'll add, is maybe start working on the next stage chords.
I usually found that if my progress stagnates doing certain chords, by starting to work on adding chords from the next stage, the original chords would improve. I suspect it's because the earlier chords become relatively easier.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Dr Winterbourne on November 30, 2015, 03:29:05 pm
My old kendo sensai used to say 'Speed comes from technique, technique comes from practice,' which also applies here.

Sky Diver, I think you are working from a similar philosophy. I think what you are doing is a good idea, but maybe throw in a set of 'as fast as possible' ones. It's a different mindset, and one that is just as important as precision. eg, if you are jamming along or something, it is good to have practiced pushing yourself.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Rockett on December 04, 2015, 08:11:03 pm
Okay so whenever I take my time with these chords individually I can get them sounding pretty nice, but doing these 1 minute changes, Justin states the importance of pushing yourself. I've tried pushing myself and 9 times out of 10 my chords sound extremely sloppy because I'm rushing it but that's a rule on this.

Who else's chords sounded sloppy when doing this? Definitely seems like quality over quantity on this one.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: tobyjenner on December 04, 2015, 08:58:32 pm
Rockett

First off welcome to the forum.

If the bulk of the chords are sloppy I'd back off on the speed a little. Aim for at least 7/10 good chords IMO. There's a frequent adage on these pages and that's "practice makes permanent". So yes these exercises are about speed but no at the expense of all accuracy.

Toby
 8)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: mouleeshmichael on December 28, 2015, 02:32:33 pm
Hi guitarists,

It has been two weeks since I bought and practice Guitar and I am practicing this 1 minute changes lesson for the last four days (1 hr each day). Still I am getting an average of 6-8 changes for 1 minute.

How I should continue my practice?

Should I continue practicing the same lesson till i achieve the 30 changes per minute goal? or I can move on with the next lessons but continuously practicing 1 minute changes lesson also.

Please guide me as I feel like stuck with the same lesson and no improvement kind of mood or any suggestions how I should practice as on Saturday and Sunday I get more time to practice.

What is the ideal no of hours a person can practice a day?

Thank you
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Dr Winterbourne on December 28, 2015, 05:36:32 pm
Is this all you are practising? I would think that would be very boring. One great thing about the Beginner's Course, as it is set out on this site is that it gives the new guitarist a set of things to learn together, at each stage, and so you improve wholistically - speed, accuracy, rhythm, theory, listening, repertoire.

Go to the Beginner's Course section, and do all of the Stage One lessons and then practice all of them, as outline in the last lesson of the stage. And start learning some of the Stage One songs.

I think.

Otherwise, you will be able to change chords really fast, but in a few months when someone asks you to play something, what will you show them?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Rockett on December 28, 2015, 06:19:03 pm
Moule, I was also wondering that myself but Dr does have a good point. The way stage 1 is structured implies that you practice all of them together. Staying on one section until you master it will just burn you out.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bradt on December 28, 2015, 10:19:36 pm
Yep, what the others said.

Also, be sure to read the stage 1 practice schedule. That will be your guide for what to be practicing.

http://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-119-PRACTICEstage1.php


Be sure to read it all the way to the bottom, don't just watch the video. :)

Quote
Beware of trying to perfect every stage, as that will just lead to a feeling of hopelessness! I'm still trying to perfect simple things, and to be honest, I don't think we ever stop improving, so there is no ‘end game' – don't wait until every chord is PERFECT, be happy with good. Perfect will come later! That said, don't be moving on if you are sloppy as a wet sandwich either!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Vocaloidas on December 29, 2015, 05:08:30 pm
Hey guys, I seem to be having problems with this exercise. I've been practicing for last two days 1-2h per day and I can't seem to hit the right strings, the chord changes between D and A are very easy, but I just can't seem to consistently hit the right strings with my pick. Can someone give me some advice on that please?

What I mean when I can't hit the right strings is that when I'm doing a D chord, I sometimes hit the A string when strumming and not D string. There's something probably wrong with the way I'm maybe holding a pick or how my hand is placed on the guitar...
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: tobyjenner on December 29, 2015, 08:05:15 pm
Hi Vocal

Welcome to the forum. Start by slowing right down and focus on hitting the correct strings for each chord, just like you should be doing for the strum part of the pick/strum exercise. Make sure you're only hitting the thinnest 4 strings for the D and all bar the thickest for the A. Don't worry about speed for now, just aim for being accurate on each chord but still move slowly between the two but real slow. Get used to the slow but accurate change and then slow start bringing the speed up. Sounds like its early days for you so there's no need to rush but you will get there with practice but practicing correctly.

Hope that helps

Toby
 8)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: close2u on December 29, 2015, 08:24:49 pm
Hi Vocaloidas
Welcome
Are you definitely referring to one minute changes?
You should not be spending one to two hours on this exercise.
Nor should you be worried about full accuracy to begin.
Check the lesson you are practicing.
And read the thread here from the start also.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: SKA on January 04, 2016, 04:30:10 pm
Any good advice on how to deal with lazy fingers muting strings behind them? Is it something that corrects itself with time and practice or something that if I do not actively get on top of before I train muscle memory I am hurting myself?

I am at day 3 by the way, I have all chords memorized, but rather then switching to the one minute changes at this time, I am just doing D -> E -> A over and over strumming and individually picking it out to ensure mechanically my fingers are in the right spot. I want to move on to the changes practice soon, but don't want to get there if I could be training my hand improperly.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on January 04, 2016, 05:50:33 pm
Make sure your fingers have enough curl to them and once your calluses build up it will
help as well. 
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: SKA on January 04, 2016, 05:52:01 pm
Make sure your fingers have enough curl to them and once your calluses build up it will
help as well.

Yeah, I have to stop playing at 15ish minutes because I notice the string imprints in my fingers get so deep that sometimes I am not aware of where I am on the string or if I am pressing hard enough.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Rossco01 on January 05, 2016, 08:11:02 am
and you'll get that for sometime SKA whilst you're only practicing the early stages because your fingers are always just going between the three or four chords. As you progress your calluses will develop across the finger and you wont have those deep lines or grooves.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: tobyjenner on January 05, 2016, 02:33:15 pm
If you've got those 3 chords ringing clean most of the time, I'd start the 1 minute changes. Just keep on working on the pick strum pick exercise alongside them, to build strength, accuracy and muscle memory. The 1 MCs are not a replacement exercise as you're working different skills ie changing at speed. But start a bit slow to start with and gradually increase the speed. Don't worry about the odd fumble as you'll improve with practice and all the time build those calluses up  8)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: justinguitar on January 07, 2016, 08:40:48 am
It's certainly important to keep the strum - pick - strum thing going at the same time as one minute changes, so the chords get fast and clean!

@SKA
Try to practice a little often - hurting your fingers is not a good idea!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: nickbay on February 05, 2016, 05:50:43 pm
I started chord changes 5 days ago. Sometimes I can do 30 if I'm lucky.
I am being very picky about getting it right.
The problem is my #1 finger keeps getting a groove in it and then the string doesn't ring out. If I press harder it helps but eventually the string is muted. I'm starting to get a little bit of callus and at this time I play for about 10 minutes and then push my finger tip back into shape. I'm only practicing about 30 minutes a day.

Sometimes I can't seem to do anything right and I just read the replies here and that is such an uplift.
I wanted to thank the people who post because without your experiences and giving hope I think I would have given up by now.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Roadking04 on February 05, 2016, 05:53:15 pm
Keep going, I had a similar issue but kept following Justin's advice and can now do 70 clear changes. Phil


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Nocturnal1961 on April 30, 2016, 11:15:12 am
I have been doing D and A minute change ans got up to 15 D and E 13  D, A E A d 12. BF getting mad about me doing A the way Justin told me and says it will hinder me down the road and then tried to show me by using cords I have not learned yet.  So guess I have to start doing A his way to keep the peace.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Rossco01 on April 30, 2016, 11:24:19 am
The reason Justin shows A as he does is because it's just so easy early on to anchor between those early chords...it's also pretty easy when you do Asus chords too. Later in the course he'll show you the mini bar for the A chord too. I still use Justin's method and it hasn't caused me any problems with other open chords or barre chords.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: shadowscott007 on April 30, 2016, 12:42:03 pm
BF wrong.  Been playing 40 years.  Switched to the "Justin" A grip.

Shadow
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Nocturnal1961 on May 01, 2016, 02:42:45 am
Hmm Started practicing AA  DD. EE  DD  EE.  EEEE  AA  I think this is good practice right now with these cord it a Wild Thing. Hee hee.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bradt on May 01, 2016, 04:03:20 am
BF getting mad about me doing A the way Justin told me and says it will hinder me down the road and then tried to show me by using cords I have not learned yet.

If your BF only ever plays each chord one way, he is the one that is hindered. His way, my way, Justin's way; it doesn't matter. They are all right given the right situation, and they can all be a less desirable option in others. Justin even mentions this later in the course when he teaches a second way to play the A chord. Overall, I think Justin provides some sound reasoning for what he is doing and it has worked for a lot of people. I would suggest sticking with it for now.

BTW, if you watch a lot of Justin's song videos you will notice that he will often play the A chord a number of different ways...sometimes in the same song.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Buckeye1971 on May 01, 2016, 05:03:28 am
Quote
BF getting mad about me doing A the way Justin told me and says it will hinder me down the road and then tried to show me by using cords I have not learned yet.

If you feel your BF is a better guitar player and more importantly a better teacher than Justin, then by all means you should listen to him. However, considering Justin has been teaching guitar for over 25 years I am going to go out on a limb and say he is not.

 
Quote
If your BF only ever plays each chord one way, he is the one that is hindered. His way, my way, Justin's way; it doesn't matter. They are all right given the right situation, and they can all be a less desirable option in others. Justin even mentions this later in the course when he teaches a second way to play the A chord. Overall, I think Justin provides some sound reasoning for what he is doing and it has worked for a lot of people. I would suggest sticking with it for now.

Totally agree with bradt.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Nocturnal1961 on May 01, 2016, 08:40:04 am
My BF is 61 I am 55 I have been playing guitar for maybe a month and a half he has been playing since a teen and he plays by ear, I told him that is good and a gift but not all can do that. I am still doing the A as Justin taught. I Googled songs that could be played with just D, A, and E, I saw Wild Thing and I like that song so then Googled how to play Wild Thing on guitar. I found a youtube video  of someone that told me. I am just doing first part of song and it is a good one for just learning cause the guy says AA mute DD mute EE mute DD mute.... Those mutes allow me time to change chord and play next chord.  It is something I can do at moment  till I get faster. I am still practice A, D, and E. So it can't be too bad. I surprised him with it tonight and he did not say a word about me doing A wrong.  I just wanted to try a song and I am not doing whole song till i can do first part of this song perfect. I am still trying timed. It bugs me now cause I can not play for long till it does not sound right and it does not sound right because my fingers developed creases from the strings and when strings go into those creases I can not push down enough for chords to sound right. The creases do not hurt but the poor sound from guitar does. I stop and bang my finger tips on coffee table and last night started to suck on finger tips in effort to get creases out.  I will never get through a song until my finger stop creasing any ideas on how to remedy that?  I like Justin and I am still following his direction I just stayed a little to find a song I liked to give me a goal. Said I don't quit easily and I don't I considered trying it his way but then I don't get anchor finger to help. The guy doing Wild Thing said it was tricky going from D to E and from E back to D I show my BF The Wild Thing video and when he said going from E to D was tricky I said I did not find it tricky using the anchor finger Justin has taught.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: derek.knight on May 01, 2016, 09:42:07 am
When you get a bit further, look at the video tutorial Justin has done for Wild Thing. Yes, it's just A,D and E, but in a few stages you will learn strumming patterns, and the you can do Wild Thing like The Troggs did. I wouldn't recommend doing that right now, but well done for sticking to your guns. A, D and E are much easier if you can keep your index finger on the G string

By the way, give it a month or so and your finger tips will harden and the creases will go. You'll also find that you don't need to press as hard as you probably are. I know I did (I'm at 7 months now). People talk about making sure your guitar action isn't too high and trying lower number strings. These two things can help you get the strings down without using too much pressure, but I'd say just wait a wee while and see if your fingers get used to getting the strings down


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Nocturnal1961 on May 01, 2016, 11:40:24 pm
Hit new high in D and A got 19 in a minute still 13 highest in D E  A E real bad but still practicing and Added the first part of Wild thing cause that is encouraging to me. Also ordered both 1 and 2 of song books on April 20th I live in Kalamazoo Michigan how long before I get them?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Nocturnal1961 on May 02, 2016, 09:58:30 am
I have practiced a lot today and tips of fingers feel numb. Is that normal? For those that wonder about my name Nocturnal is because I work 3rd shift and keep my same waking and sleeping hours on days off work as my work nights. Next March I hope to retire and soon  after join the normal sleep nights and awake days like the rest of the world. I have a question soon I need to take my amp in get it serviced. I got it off of Craig's list and the person who had it said it has sat for several years. When I do that is it ok to practice on a classical till I get my amp back?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Nocturnal1961 on May 02, 2016, 10:46:15 pm
Tomorrow I go meet someone selling an Epiphone Sorrento. It comes with Epiphone case. It is hollow body and electric or accoustic. I think it's a beautiful guitar. The guy said I will like it cause strings are set low making it easier for beginners like me to play. Can't wait!  When my amp goes in to be service I can use this.

Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: 12-string_Doug on May 02, 2016, 11:45:30 pm
  Re the A chord: Play what works for you. Work on variations later. I'm older than the BF, and I can make declarations like that.  ;)

  That Sorrento looks pretty nice. I might add an Epiphone to my collection one of these days.

  When you get around to other songs, "Gloria" is also an E-D-A progression. Dave Barry, the humorist, played (or maybe still plays) in a band of all authors, called The Rock Bottom Remainders. Dave said you could toss a guitar off a cliff, and it would play "Gloria" on the way down. Bruce Springsteen showed up at a booksellers convention in LA where the Remainders were playing, and joined in with them.
Quote
"I picked up one of the two guitars I'd been using, and just as we were about to start, Stephen King tapped me on the shoulder and said, 'We have a special guest.' I turned around, and there was Bruce Springsteen. I still don't know how he came to be at this convention; I don't believe he's a bookseller. All I know is, he was picking up the other guitar. My guitar. 'Bruce,' I said to him. 'Do you know the guitar part to "Gloria"?' This is like asking James Michener if he knows how to write his name." – Dave Barry

    "Your band's not too bad. It's not too good either. Don't let it get any better, otherwise you'll just be another lousy band." – Bruce Springsteen
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock_Bottom_Remainders (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock_Bottom_Remainders)

  Dave has some comments about "Wild Thing" here: http://www.rockbottomremainders.com/images/Article-Glory_Days.pdf (http://www.rockbottomremainders.com/images/Article-Glory_Days.pdf)

  Have fun.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Nocturnal1961 on May 03, 2016, 11:57:36 pm
I love this guitar and really want to be able to play her well. I think I'll name her Honey Sweet. She is gorgeous and sound good. She  does not make amp scream. Pray I get much faster soon so I can move up in stages.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Nocturnal1961 on May 08, 2016, 02:01:23 am
I have colosses on my fingers and it does not hurt like it did but one finger the colosse the one nearest my pinky has a string crease that does not come out and I guess it cracks or something and a hard piece skin pops up and catches on strings. I filed it down once today and just had to file it again.  What else can I do? My A-D count it up to 22 or 23 a minute. Is it right to keep practicing these 2 till I get better before moving to A-E  and D-E?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on May 08, 2016, 03:07:03 am
You should be prcticing all 3 each day. This give you a veriaty so you don't get board and
each string uses different parts of the finger so it changes up the creases so they don't become
permanent .
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Nocturnal1961 on May 09, 2016, 01:59:50 am
Thank Stitch I was not getting bored yet but I did not want to start from beginning with D to E the A to E.  So been doing D, E,D, E back and forth for a bit cause E seems to be my hardest. Then go to D, E, A, D, D, E, A, D, A, E, A, E ,D, E, A, D. ;D Sorry but had to make a word from letters
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Nocturnal1961 on May 12, 2016, 05:05:50 am
DA 20,  DE 20, AE 13 now. Been practicing everyday since starting and more as of late because I am on vacation this week and next. Just seems I should be faster by now. When I say 20 it is 10 complete and when I say 13 that is only 6 complete and start of next.  BF wants me to move on and learn more chords but I say what good would that do cause if I play a song no one sings that slow not even in church. I will get faster I am sure, it just seems it is taking me a long, long time.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Rossco01 on May 12, 2016, 08:39:14 am
Nocturnal all I can encourage you to do is stick at it. Just remember that the 1 min changes in the BC are about SPEED and not accuracy. That means you can expect initially a high level of errors. It doesn't matter! the whole point is to get your fingers moving quickly between the chords as best you can i.e. it's forcing you to move quicker (even they don't sound that great).

Remember a separate part of your practice schedule should be about getting the chords nice and accurate by placing your fingers correctly strumming and then picking each string.

In terms of your BF ignore him as best you can. If you need pacify him there is no harm in looking at the minor chords as in particular Em (Emaj without the first finger) and Am are (same shape as Emaj moved across) are pretty easy. Even if you just start the Strum & Pick practice it wont hurt. Dm and then moving onto C and G may be a little harder (I found C and Dm a bit awkward but G relatively easy).
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Shaolindelt on May 12, 2016, 02:25:00 pm
I found that once I got my changes up around 20 cycles (40 changes) I was almost close enough to work on some songs.  What put me over the top on some were throwing a song on and playing along with it.  Yeah - I missed a lot of chords because of the changes, but learned to keep the rhythm and counts in my head and get to the next chord.  Play the song a few times and I've just spent 10 or 15 minutes on chord changes.  :) It also got me out of the "has to be perfect" mindset ... Eventually yes, you want it perfect, but as a beginner, one good chord every bar made me feel like I was at least part of the song.

I tried this with chord changes I was worse with (like only around 10 or 15 cycles) and I was too bad with chords yet to really move at song speed.


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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: inspain on May 12, 2016, 08:40:05 pm
I used to find it impossible too. In stage 5 this is addressed with the air changes lesson, and to begin with I thought there was no hope for all the fingers ever going down at once with the D chord - then all of a sudden, after maybe a couple of weeks of a few minutes practice a day, it just happened. All three fingers forming the shape in the air and going down together to form D (though when playing faster they still sometimes go down in steps again...). So it is possible - the air changes in stage 5 begin to make it happen with a lot of patience. If you aren't there yet I wouldn't worry about it too much.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: derek.knight on May 13, 2016, 06:08:33 am
What shaolin said. Get good enough at chords to play songs, even if badly. The songs then help chords, which helps songs.

I practised my one minute changes religiously and when I was starting the C chord, I could do perhaps 10-15 per minute (that's 20-30 individual changes, since my personal system is to count pairs e.g A-D-A is one pair). I've since added Amin, Dmin, G, F and the 7 chords. I had a personal goal that I wanted to do 30 changes a minute, which given I'm counting pairs means one change every second.

A few months ago I stopped doing my changes every day, but worked on songs, now I have about 20 songs that I can play to some extent (at that time my changes were in the twenties a minute). If you're playing a song at 80 bpm, then being able to change chords at the speed I was doing means you can pretty much keep up with the song. You might sometimes have a lag as you change from, say A to D minor (which I did find hard). However by practicing songs you get your muscle memory working and the changes get better, because you want to keep the song beat going.

In the past week I have been working hard on House of the Rising Sun - especially the finger picked version. This has D-F and F-AMin. Today I went back to time some changes that were my slowest (typically anything with an F in it). What a revelation. I can now do D-F changes at 40 pairs a minute and Amin-F at 37. And that is not by practising the changes, but by practising songs.

I also achieved my personal goal today. I have a list of 36 pairs of chords that I record my change times in. Most combinations of the chords I know. I can do all of these at 30 pairs of changes a minute. In addition, by learning songs, I now can do other chords, ones that are not in the beginners course - because the song requires it.

I guess what I'm saying is don't get disillusioned if you can't get your changes fast. If they are fast enough for you to play songs, then spend some time playing songs and your changes will come right. You'll be surprised just how much it helps.


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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Nocturnal1961 on May 14, 2016, 08:58:54 am
Today I was thrilled when doing D to A and was counting and went pass 23 and hit 25 before buzzer went off. I got 23 on D to E and 21 on A to E.  So I know it is not great but it I know I am getting faster.  I love my guitar. I have this weekend and next week and and that weekend and 2 more days after that off on vacation so it gives me more practice time hopefully I will be closer to 60 (which will be 30 rounds), By time I have to go back to work.  I love my guitar too.
 
[imghttp://(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y285/CauliflowerClown/Epiphone%20Sorrento_zpszhczmbgk.jpg) (http://s7.photobucket.com/user/CauliflowerClown/media/Epiphone%20Sorrento_zpszhczmbgk.jpg.html)][/img]
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Shaolindelt on May 14, 2016, 01:42:46 pm
Keep it up!  And nice looking guitar!


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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: catsquotl on May 14, 2016, 02:54:15 pm
Somehow what really seems to help me at the moment is set a metronome for double the speed I am aiming for.
The tick between having to have to complete the change seems to tell my fingers I have time enough whereas if the have to have moved every tick I mess up..

Not sure if that works in the near future, but for now wanting to get everything to 40 or 50 changes a minute setting a metronome to 80 or a 100 works like a charm.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Shaolindelt on May 14, 2016, 03:50:26 pm
Somehow what really seems to help me at the moment is set a metronome for double the speed I am aiming for.
The tick between having to have to complete the change seems to tell my fingers I have time enough whereas if the have to have moved every tick I mess up..

Not sure if that works in the near future, but for now wanting to get everything to 40 or 50 changes a minute setting a metronome to 80 or a 100 works like a charm.
Sometimes Jedi mind tricks help!  :)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bradt on May 14, 2016, 03:54:38 pm
Somehow what really seems to help me at the moment is set a metronome for double the speed I am aiming for.

That is a great exercise, but you should still do the 1 minute changes as written from time to time. The thing is, the one minute changes get you out of your head. They force you to make the changes without really leaving yourself time to think, and that can be immensely helpful.

With the metronome set as you have, you still have time to think "1, E, 3, A, 1, E, 3, A..." and play with the metronome. There is an order to it. I did the same thing you are doing, and it was great for accuracy at speed, but there are still plenty of benefits to be had from doing the 1 minute changes as intended.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Lord_Gigabyte on May 15, 2016, 01:00:48 pm
For me, that's the hardest part. Getting out of my own mind. Letting my fingers do the work and kinda "zone out" that whole minute. The thing is, i need to count the switches and listen to the chord (if it's bad, it doesn't count). But that stops me somewhat from getting out and that mucks up the one minute challenge... and then i get pissed... Which doesn't help either.

I am getting better at it, i keep a record of my progress, practicing 6/7 days, 5 minutes a day, but it's a hard road to walk.

But in the end, i'll get there... The trick is, i think, not to give up. Keep on going...
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Shaolindelt on May 15, 2016, 05:40:27 pm
The thing is, i need to count the switches and listen to the chord (if it's bad, it doesn't count). But that stops me somewhat from getting out and that mucks up the one minute challenge... and then i get pissed... Which doesn't help either.

Try to remember - one minute Ganges aren't supposed to be perfect on every one, it's about moving your fingers and getting faster.  Accuracy will come but they actually develop separately.  If you completely botch the chord, sure, it doesn't count.  But if you mute a string or two, or didn't have a string pressed down all the way - it's ok in this exercise.  Relax and don't judge yourself too hard. 
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: jtbrown1 on May 15, 2016, 07:10:38 pm
Today I was thrilled when doing D to A and was counting and went pass 23 and hit 25 before buzzer went off. I got 23 on D to E and 21 on A to E.  So I know it is not great but it I know I am getting faster.  I love my guitar. I have this weekend and next week and and that weekend and 2 more days after that off on vacation so it gives me more practice time hopefully I will be closer to 60 (which will be 30 rounds), By time I have to go back to work.  I love my guitar too.
 
[imghttp://(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y285/CauliflowerClown/Epiphone%20Sorrento_zpszhczmbgk.jpg) (http://s7.photobucket.com/user/CauliflowerClown/media/Epiphone%20Sorrento_zpszhczmbgk.jpg.html)][/img]
Good looking guitar. Is that an Epiphone Wildkat?

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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Lord_Gigabyte on May 16, 2016, 07:05:06 pm
Try to remember - one minute Ganges aren't supposed to be perfect on every one, it's about moving your fingers and getting faster.  Accuracy will come but they actually develop separately.  If you completely botch the chord, sure, it doesn't count.  But if you mute a string or two, or didn't have a string pressed down all the way - it's ok in this exercise.  Relax and don't judge yourself too hard.

Allright. Thank you for that piece of advise. I will take this with me when doing the one minute challenge.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Nocturnal1961 on May 18, 2016, 11:04:01 pm
JTBrown it is an Epiphone Sorrento and I love it. that was the craig's list picture and when I seen it I thought it was beautiful and it is both acoustic and electric. I do love it and her name is Honey Sweet Gorgeous baby isn't she? On another note today so far on minute change I got Aand E 30 Dand A 32  Dand E 29 but I did hit 30 on that the other day just not today but the day is not over. Still practicing a lot I have 6 day of my vacation left to practice, practice, practice!  :D
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Nocturnal1961 on May 21, 2016, 10:13:30 pm
What is wrong with me today? Yesterday on all D to A, A to E, and D to E I hit all time high of 34. Got busy with cleaning house a rearranging things and before bed did another run through and all was 29 or 30 no more. I thought I was just tired. It a new day and still having trouble. My callouses seem to actually get caught on some strings and for some reason having trouble making clean notes.  Should I file my callouses down and on edges where there get caught on strings?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Shaolindelt on May 22, 2016, 03:28:28 am
What is wrong with me today? Yesterday on all D to A, A to E, and D to E I hit all time high of 34. Got busy with cleaning house a rearranging things and before bed did another run through and all was 29 or 30 no more. I thought I was just tired. It a new day and still having trouble. My callouses seem to actually get caught on some strings and for some reason having trouble making clean notes.  Should I file my callouses down and on edges where there get caught on strings?
Probably not on the file ... Unless they are crazy or something but can't see that happening. 

My advice - go play some songs for a few days and ignore the one minute changes for a bit.  You'll be surprised how much a respite helps. 
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Omar on May 22, 2016, 09:59:56 am
Try to remember - one minute Ganges aren't supposed to be perfect on every one, it's about moving your fingers and getting faster.  Accuracy will come but they actually develop separately.  If you completely botch the chord, sure, it doesn't count.  But if you mute a string or two, or didn't have a string pressed down all the way - it's ok in this exercise.  Relax and don't judge yourself too hard.

I'm following your advice and I can notice improvement in terms of fast changes. But still, I lack accuracy.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: tobyjenner on May 22, 2016, 10:17:00 am
Nocturnal - if there's bits of dry flaky skin around the callouses, file those down carefully but don't grind away at the hard skin that you've built up. Those small flaps can catch the string sometimes.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Shaolindelt on May 22, 2016, 03:59:28 pm
I'm following your advice and I can notice improvement in terms of fast changes. But still, I lack accuracy.
Good!  Save accuracy for songs ... For the one minute changes, just keep the speed up!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Nocturnal1961 on May 22, 2016, 11:07:44 pm
I am  afraid I can not practice today. I hope I can tomorrow. I have done something to finger tips and they are very tender. It is not just pushing down guitar strings but also on this laptop key booard. Don't know what I did. I do not see anying wrong. I just feel pain when any pressure is on them. I hope it is better tomorrow as I go back to work Wednesday night. I got a lot more practice time in while off and maybe I over did it some just hope it don't set me back any.   Thank you Justin for this site I hope someday to be able to play well.  Not giving up yet I want to learn this.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Lord_Gigabyte on May 23, 2016, 07:52:08 am
Ah yes, those callusses... For me it was painfull building them up. Now, a few months later, they're somewhat thick and i don't feel the pain anymore. (Or at least , not so much as before).

The thing is, it doesn't matter if you skip a day or two in the week. It happens to me too. Don't sweat it. That'll just screw things up even more. Your fingers will be ok in the end i guess. Keep at it, that's the trick. Slowly, but surely. For me, the stopping point always is this: if i feel too much pain in my fingers, it's time to stop. I'll pick it up again, tomorrow. (or the day after that, if life interferes).

I don't know what it was that you did to your fingertips, but the human skin is a strong thing. It will rebuild itself time and time again.... So patience is the cure, i guess... That, and gentle practice.... (oh, and keep a record of your one minute challenge progress. That really helped me. Looking at my ups and downs... Competing with myself... )

Good luck practicing!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: guitar65riff on May 28, 2016, 11:07:00 am
The problem with calluses is that we think they have to be kept dry to be maintained.
You can wash dishes and use hand cream without them being affected. I use hand cream several times a day in winter and it doesn't affect them. The build up of the callus is below the surface. Keeping the top layer moisturised will stop them cracking and splitting.

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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: MCosta84 on June 01, 2016, 02:37:41 am
I have been doing the 1 minute changes for one week now and I read this entire post and I am more confused then ever.

Justin says perfection is not required, so some of my chords I accidentally mute/buzz the high E string with my hand, some I don't. This post makes it sound like if you have even the slightest mistake it doesn't count at all, so which is? How am I suppose to get a decent idea of where my count is with these conflicting ideas of what counts?

So confused.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Buckeye1971 on June 01, 2016, 03:16:56 am
Hello MCosta and welcome to the forum.

There are two different exercises for working on your chords. one for accuracy and one for speed. Justin explains them in his stage 1 practice schedule.

Quote
Chord Practice
The point of this exercise is to get your chords sounding clear, and to train your fingers to go to exactly the right spot to get each chord sounding great.
• Start with a strum, then pick each note individually, and then strum again.
• Don't play any strings that have the X next to them in the chord diagram.
• Try to play the notes with the tips of your fingers.
• Remember that dead-sounding notes need to be fixed, and the usual causes are either:
       a) The finger is too far from the fret.
       b) One of your fingers is touching a string that it shouldn't.

Move your fingers around as you pick out the strings until they all sound good and then strum the chord again; as you play the last strum, tell your fingers that this is how you want them to go next time. It will look a little strange to anyone that is watching you, but it really helps! ;)

One Minute Changes
The object of this exercise is to get your fingers moving quickly. Although you should be trying to get the fingers in the perfect positions that you have been working on in your chord practice, if they are a little sloppy it is OK, we are working up the speed here!

The important thing here is to practise the chord changes that you struggle with the most. In your practice schedule you should write in the amount of changes that you made in that practice session. Make sure you use your timer, and push yourself to go as fast as possible.

Use chord practice to get your chords accurate and one minute changes to work on your speed.
hope this helps.  :)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: MCosta84 on June 01, 2016, 03:24:30 am
Thank you for the response.

I do both, I am just confused as to what to count as a clean chord change to track my progress.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Buckeye1971 on June 01, 2016, 03:47:08 am
@MCosta

Quote
I do both, I am just confused as to what to count as a clean chord change to track my progress.

If there is some buzzing or you deaden a string go ahead and count them. If it sounds like total garbage don't.

Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Lord_Gigabyte on June 01, 2016, 08:47:11 am
@MCosta

If there is some buzzing or you deaden a string go ahead and count them. If it sounds like total garbage don't.

Yep, that's exactly what i did too. And believe it or not, within time and with enough practice, the chords will sound right and you'll get a great count..( i know i did)

Just keep at it and don't stop.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Shaolindelt on June 02, 2016, 03:23:11 am
+1 on the slightly wrong chords.  If I hit a string I wasn't supposed to (say the low E when trying my D chord) I didn't worry about it and still counted it for the one minute changes. When I couldn't even get my third finger down on the high E for a G chord, I went back to practicing that chord shape before getting it into my one minute changes.


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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: MCosta84 on June 04, 2016, 10:03:18 pm
Thank you for the responses. I usually don't hit the wrong strings and they never sound bad just sometimes I get a small buzz off the high E or deaden the high E string. Currently I am at 1.5 weeks and getting counts of 30-35 for each change if counting singular chords, I think this is good.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: DarkHorse on June 05, 2016, 02:33:52 am
Thought I'd drop in and give some encouragement to those finding the early stages difficult.
When you're learning your first chords and becoming used to changing between them it seems impossible. With sheer perseverance and through following good instruction you will look back and wonder why you ever had an issue.
I remember when I finally played my first D chord after trying to get my fingers in the right place for a few hours, and I was of course delighted! Now D is automatic and no matter which chord I'm going from, or which song I'm playing, I can just grab it without thinking about it, and it sounds good. After a while all of the chords you learn will become like this. Keep going, practice every day if you can - you will see the results.
I wouldn't worry too much about hitting too many strings - at the early stages your main focus should be on developing finger dexterity and speed - your strumming technique comes later on, sometimes instinctively if you listen to music a lot and your chord changes are solid. Sometimes hitting an extra string can add a bit of edge and depth to the chord if it's done correctly. A little bit of buzz is (usually) easily adjusted and isn't too noticeable to a listener. Don't expect every chord you ever play to be perfect.
5 months ago I was just starting the beginner's course and learning my first chords  - now I'm on stage 7 and I've fallen in love with the guitar. Keep going, practice hard - you'll see the benefits.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: raze2dust on June 05, 2016, 09:41:48 pm
It's been 5 days of regular practice, doing each pair of A/D/E 5 times every day, and I am still at 13-15 per minute. And not all of them are perfect either. At this rate, it will take me at least another month to get to 30 on all pairs. How much time did you guys take to get to 30 on all 3 pairs when starting? I should add that I am 27, so it's harder for me compared to the kids.

I really struggle on D/A. After a few strums, the second finger just refuses to bend correctly for D after playing A. And I then have to really struggle with my Ds. D/E and A/E are going fine though. Having a really hard time with D/A.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Rossco01 on June 05, 2016, 09:51:24 pm
5 days really isn't a long time practicing so don't be hard on yourself. Everyone is different but you need to think of learning in months. Oh I started at 42 so I was no kid and it took me about nine months to get the learning done but at least another six months consolidation. When you move to stage 2 it'll be because you need to learn more rather than being competent in stage 1. Keep it at it, get the beginners song book it'll help and above all stick at it.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: inspain on June 08, 2016, 09:48:44 am
raze2dust - Don't worry, it won't take you another month I'm sure. Give yourself another week and see where you are then. I can't remember how long it took me to get to 30 a minute for A/D/E - I think about a week and then I moved on to stage 2, but I'd learned a bit many years before, so that helped.

But it's taking me weeks and weeks with the F chord to get up to 30 a minute - but I don't mind, because now I know that if I just keep at it I'll get there in the end because that's what's happened with the G, the C, Dm, all the other ones I found tricky. (BTW, I'm 43, still young! 27 is no problem at all!)

It can be disconcerting at times but progress happens in leaps and plateaus - after you are stuck on a plateau for a while, suddenly you jump up and notice real progress - frustratingly you never know when that will happen! Relax, throw all expectations out of the window, and just keep at it. If frustration is spoiling the fun, try something else after a while, maybe from the next stage, and the rest will catch up as you go along if you don't go too far too fast and keep coming back to easy songs.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Conor on June 10, 2016, 10:16:58 pm
Sorry to be posting here again, but I just had a thought, am I supposed to be strumming when I do the one minute chord changes? It just kind of struck me I may have been strumming unnecessarily this whole time... Also, follow up question, if you do have to be strumming on the one minute changes, does it matter much if I can't consistently get the right placement on the strum with my right hand? For example on a D to E change, i find it tough to change from starting the strum on the E string to starting the strum on the D string :/
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on June 10, 2016, 10:39:18 pm
Watch this video from 2:00 to 2:14
All you need to know is in this 14 seconds of video.

http://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-115-1MinuteChanges.php
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: jtbrown1 on June 10, 2016, 10:53:23 pm
Sorry to be posting here again, but I just had a thought, am I supposed to be strumming when I do the one minute chord changes? It just kind of struck me I may have been strumming unnecessarily this whole time... Also, follow up question, if you do have to be strumming on the one minute changes, does it matter much if I can't consistently get the right placement on the strum with my right hand? For example on a D to E change, i find it tough to change from starting the strum on the E string to starting the strum on the D string :/
Yes, you're supposed to strum during the 1MC.

Your strumming isn't supposed to be so precise that you have to start the strum on the D string when playing the D chord. You need to pay attention during the videos, as Justin explains exactly how to play the D chord. The sixth string you can mute with your left hand thumb. The fifth string is ok to play as part of the D chord - it's an A note, which is part of the D major chord.

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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Conor on June 10, 2016, 11:32:37 pm
Oh okay I didn't realise there were videos of all the lessons that helps :) I'm pretty sure justin says as a beginner you shouldn't do the thumb muting the e-sting thing, i'll learn that later
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: tobyjenner on June 10, 2016, 11:39:53 pm
Oh okay I didn't realise there were videos of all the lessons that helps :) I'm pretty sure justin says as a beginner you shouldn't do the thumb muting the e-sting thing, i'll learn that later

Conor

This link should help http://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-000-BeginnersCourse.php intro and links to all stages and lessons for the BC. 8)

And for info here's all Justin's lessons

http://www.justinguitar.com/en/AA-000-LessonIndex.php
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Lord_Gigabyte on June 12, 2016, 04:00:38 pm
Raze2Dust, i've been at the 1 minute challenges for a few months! (And stil keeping up with them). The big trick is, don't stop. Don't quit.
Your muscles need to train themselves. The movements need to be remembered. This will take time. (at least it did so in my case). But now (a few months of hard work later) i'm comfortable where i am with my 1 minute challenge. (and moved on to stage 2 of the BC).

Hard work WILL get you there in the end. Begin by going slow, remember, those muscles are learning new tricks. That will take time. But in the end, you'll get there, i'm sure.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: jtbrown1 on June 13, 2016, 05:18:23 pm
Oh okay I didn't realise there were videos of all the lessons that helps :) I'm pretty sure justin says as a beginner you shouldn't do the thumb muting the e-sting thing, i'll learn that later
Just my opinion. You'll have a much better experience using your thumb to mute the sixth string when playing the D major, than trying to expertly strum without hitting the sixth string.

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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: joueur de guitare on June 13, 2016, 05:27:12 pm
Just my opinion. You'll have a much better experience using your thumb to mute the sixth string when playing the D major, than trying to expertly strum without hitting the sixth string.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk

What about not hitting the A string though? ;)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Joerfe on June 13, 2016, 05:30:41 pm
As a beginner you should aim at only strumming the right strings. It targets precision and has you thinking about the root notes.
Thumb muting comes later.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: zeppelin86 on June 15, 2016, 10:26:30 pm
Hi folks, this is my first post :)

I'm not an English native speaker, so sorry in advance for grammar errors or if I'm being unclear

I'm pretty new to Justin's beginner's course and currently on about 35 changes per minute in this practice.

I have one question though - is it beneficial for me (in the long term) to try to change chords without looking at strings and frets? Currently, I first look at my fingers on frets (if they are in the right position), and then on the strings that I'm picking. I'm guessing that I'm wasting a lot of time there, so It's pretty hard for me to go beyond 40 on this practice, which is my goal before going to stage 2.

I must emphasize that I'm not interested in learning things the quick way...only the right way :)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: 12-string_Doug on June 15, 2016, 10:38:16 pm
Hi folks, this is my first post :)
  Welcome to the forum.

Quote
I'm not an English native speaker, so sorry in advance for grammar errors or if I'm being unclear
  Your English is better than that of many of my follow Americans. (And even better than mine is, some days.  ;))

Quote
I have one question though - is it beneficial for me (in the long term) to try to change chords without looking at strings and frets? Currently, I first look at my fingers on frets (if they are in the right position), and then on the strings that I'm picking. I'm guessing that I'm wasting a lot of time there, so It's pretty hard for me to go beyond 40 on this practice, which is my goal before going to stage 2.

I must emphasize that I'm not interested in learning things the quick way...only the right way :)
  I'd say that if you're getting your fingers positioned properly without having to look, that's a Good Thing. I sometimes find that if I'm a long time between practice sessions (and being out-of-practice happens a lot around here), I end up having to look where my fingers are going. Much of the time, muscle memory kicks in, and the fingers are where they should be. Other times, not so much. The resulting sounds aren't what one might call "positive reinforcement."  :o

  Have fun, and play on.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: zeppelin86 on June 16, 2016, 10:43:33 am
  Welcome to the forum.
  Your English is better than that of many of my follow Americans. (And even better than mine is, some days.  ;))
  I'd say that if you're getting your fingers positioned properly without having to look, that's a Good Thing. I sometimes find that if I'm a long time between practice sessions (and being out-of-practice happens a lot around here), I end up having to look where my fingers are going. Much of the time, muscle memory kicks in, and the fingers are where they should be. Other times, not so much. The resulting sounds aren't what one might call "positive reinforcement."  :o

  Have fun, and play on.

Hi Doug, thank you very much for your answer :)

Maybe I was a little unclear after all.

Currently, I can't change chords without looking at my finger position. Not even close. But I was wondering if it would be benefitial in the long run to try and force myself to do that.

I am aware that it would be harder that way to progress in this particular exercise, but my preasumption is that it would be better in the long run. Of course, my preasumption may be wrong. That's why I thought I should check it out with you guys :) Considering I'm still in stage 1, maybe it's way too early for that sort of stuff.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Omar on June 16, 2016, 01:55:18 pm
Hi Doug, thank you very much for your answer :)

Maybe I was a little unclear after all.

Currently, I can't change chords without looking at my finger position. Not even close. But I was wondering if it would be benefitial in the long run to try and force myself to do that.

I am aware that it would be harder that way to progress in this particular exercise, but my preasumption is that it would be better in the long run. Of course, my preasumption may be wrong. That's why I thought I should check it out with you guys :) Considering I'm still in stage 1, maybe it's way too early for that sort of stuff.

It is normal to look where you put your fingers while changing from chord to another. By time, your fingers will memorize their movements, so will your ears, you can tell if you make a mistake without looking at the frets. That's why the "one minute changes" is very important.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Buckeye1971 on June 16, 2016, 02:07:37 pm
@Zeppelin

My suggestion is to just keep looking at your fingers while your doing your changes. As you become more proficient at it you will just naturally begin to look away. In fact practicing at not looking will probably slow down your progress IMHO.

Right now your using your brain to change chords ( thinking about forming the proper shape and putting them on the right strings. Eventually, (after you have formed the chord shape a few thousand times) muscle memory will kick in and you won't have to actively think about it anymore. That will free your brain up to do other things; Like looking away.

Hope this helps.  :)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: tobyjenner on June 16, 2016, 02:50:46 pm
Zeppelin

Don't worry about looking for now, there will come a time when you don't and you probably won't realise !
Stage wise with 40 changes for the 1MCs you're probably good to move on. You can work on the stage 1 songs whilst learning the new chords/techniques of Stage 2 - from experience you're probable find your songs are a stage or 2 behind the stage your learning from. And hey, not trying to rush you through as its better to be thorough than gloss over the material and that's from a "22 months for the BC" person - me !

Toby
 8)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: zeppelin86 on June 17, 2016, 10:27:33 am
Thanks guys, all of your advices are very helpful :)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: amanbhatia94 on June 25, 2016, 06:03:34 pm
Guys I am a beginner and I am currently on Stage 4 . There is one thing that I need to ask you all. My one minute changes involving G and C are not so great, they range in between 35-43 .Is this normal? I've been practicing these changes for a minute everyday and its probably been about 10 days. (I count taking G to C as 1 change and C to G as 2nd change and so on and so forth.)

Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: jono on June 25, 2016, 07:23:39 pm
Play lots of songs. I found it a difficult change but it keeps cropping up in songs so you will soon find the speed increases if you play the songs with the change in them.


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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Rossco01 on June 25, 2016, 10:17:56 pm
Normal amanbhatia as you move through the course it gets more difficult and things will take longer to learn.  I might add that jono suggestion is spot on.  You'll build muscle memory far quicker if you try to learn songs with those chords in.G & C really open up which songs you can learn
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: amanbhatia94 on June 26, 2016, 03:45:55 pm
Thank you guys. Appreciate the help.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: ajc24 on July 04, 2016, 12:05:45 am
Hi guys,

I'm a complete beginner to the course - starting fresh faced and full of enthusiasm on Stage 1 of the BC! I had tried to learn guitar before, ironically using E, A and D like Justin starts his course with, so I'm not *completely* new. I tried too much too soon before and lost enthusiasm but I love the simple, easy to follow structure of Justins course so far.

I'd just like to ask what you would recommend as regards the 1 minute changes.

I'm following Justins practice schedule rigidly. I'm determined not to try and jump ahead of myself and do too much too soon like before. So I'm only doing the 3 recommended changes (D to A, D to E and A to E). I find A to E really straightforward compared to any of the changes that include that dreaded D chord - and also seeing so many other people posting about their own difficulties with D has helped with my own doubts a bit.

The question, really, is should I be adding in extra one minute changes that include D? What did other people do? Should I just stick to the 18 minutes with the standard 3 chord changes and then, magically, I'll wake up one morning sometime in the future and I'll have it? Or should I be extending my schedule by, say, another 5 or so minutes to include some further practice with D to A and D to E?

Also, given I am having difficulty with D, should I even consider moving on to Stage 2 while it's that little bit sloppier than A and E? Justin just says in his book to "be satisfied with good" and not aim for perfection but how what level is considered good?

What would you recommend?

Thanks for any help you can give me :)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Dr Winterbourne on July 04, 2016, 04:31:06 am
Hello and welcome.ajc.

It is normal to have some of the chànges lag behind others. An extra slot won't hurt - if you are up for it. But really, with one minute changes, I found that the harder ones tended to carry over into the next stage. Practice what you can't do, not what you can. And also, as you learn more chords, your finger dexterity increases, and formerly tricky chords get doable.

Good choice on sticking to the program. You won't believe what you'll be able to do by Christmas. Now, choose some A, D, E songs, and practice those changes in context.

Have fun.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: ajc24 on July 04, 2016, 08:35:33 am
Hello and welcome.ajc.

It is normal to have some of the chànges lag behind others. An extra slot won't hurt - if you are up for it. But really, with one minute changes, I found that the harder ones tended to carry over into the next stage. Practice what you can't do, not what you can. And also, as you learn more chords, your finger dexterity increases, and formerly tricky chords get doable.

Good choice on sticking to the program. You won't believe what you'll be able to do by Christmas. Now, choose some A, D, E songs, and practice those changes in context.

Have fun.

Thank you :)

I'm really enjoying the course - even though I'm only at it a week now. My fingers already hurt less and I can do the entire 18 minute practice in one go (as opposed to 2 to 3 minutes at a time). I have been practicing Justins suggested chord sequences instead of actual songs for now - I felt he made a good point that the sequences don't sound like any particular song so it's a good way to make the changes fast and smooth without the pressure of making anything sound like a record.

I've set my metronome to 60bpm and have spent 5 minutes just repeating a single sequence - 4 beats per bar and 4 down-strums per chord. Honestly, in just the first week, I've seen a massive improvement in my chord changes already, especially when you consider the help that the one minute changes give you too.

Thanks for the tip on the harder chord changes carrying over to the next stages - that's exactly something I was worried about (ie. should they carry across or should I have them right before moving on). With that tip, I can stress less, relax more and enjoy it more. I already know where my weakness is (the dreaded D). So I can focus on that and try to get it right.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Andrea on July 04, 2016, 10:51:23 am
Hi we have the same initials!

I think you should not delay learning songs. The course instructs you to learn songs as you go and i think you should do it that way. It takes a while to learn a song really well so the longer you delay this, the longer it will be before you can play them.

As said before, you don't need to add in extra chord changes. Just do the ones in the song you are currenlty working on or in the lesson he gives you. Over time you will get a natural increase in your chord repertoire. You will learn the chords that you need ot use and not the ones you don't have any use for.

I think Jason's methods are really great and well worth following closely as you can if you can.

I switched over from guitar to uke and just wish his uke course was as comprehensive as his guitar. I have to go with the uke because I'm taking it travelling in case you're wondering. When I come back a year into the future, I hope to resume my guitar learning and will start from scratch, Then I expect I will progress pretty fast having gone through a year of studying uke.

Don't skip the eartraining course. If you want to spend more time, do that.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: ajc24 on July 04, 2016, 11:07:25 am
Thanks for the advice Andrea :)

I probably should have been clearer about not learning songs right now - since I'm just starting (and have only been practicing a week), I decided to go with Justins advice and concentrate on the chord sequences. This has already given me a lot of confidence with my chord changes (even if they are a bit rubbish at times) and has also helped me to develop my rhythm to follow the metronome at 60bpm for now.

I will then move on to trying to learn some of the songs. I just want to build by my rhythm and confidence a bit first :)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Andrea on July 04, 2016, 03:08:18 pm
Sorry I must have forgotten what was in the first lessons. I thought he started teaching a song straight away. Sorry. I just meant to suggest you do whatever Justin suggests.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Rossco01 on July 04, 2016, 03:50:49 pm
You're not wrong Andrea, Justin does suggest right from stage 1 to start learning some songs. Three little birds is the first using A, D and E. Practice schedule for stage 1 is:-

Chord Practice (Strum / Pick / Strum) 5 mins
1 minute Changes   
--- D to A 1 min
--- D to E 1 min
--- A to E 1 min
Songs / Chord Sequences 5 mins
JUSTIN Training 5 mins

He does say songs/chord sequences. If though you haven't got the BSB get it as it'll encourage you to practice far more than just following the stage practice schedule and you will of course learn lots of songs.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: SiegeFrog on July 04, 2016, 04:13:09 pm
I think there is a little disconnect here. Many people on this forum (myself included) use the online lessons, forums, and beginners songbook exclusively. To us, it appears that Justin emphasizes learning songs right from Stage 1. For us, there are no common chord sequences. However, some people own Justin's beginner's coursebook. I'm guessing there that Justin presents some common chord sequences for each stage and puts them on equal footing as the songs. I think the OP has the coursebook.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Rossco01 on July 04, 2016, 04:44:58 pm
That would explain it SF. I think the topic has come up before. I'd still recommend playing songs over chord sequences.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: ajc24 on July 04, 2016, 06:15:42 pm
I do have the course book and there are 4 chord sequences suggested in it (he does say that he has them on the website, too, though I'm not sure where).

I'm not sure which video he says it in (probably the video about how to practice in Stage 1) but at some point in the video, Justin says that he has allocated the 5 minutes to Song Practice / Chord Sequences and, in the video, he does say that he'd suggest that chord sequences are the better choice at first as you won't be trying to make what you're playing sound like a record and you can, instead, concentrate on making the chord changes fast and smooth.

I'm nearly sure I heard that / remember that anyway :)

This is why I was saying that I'm doing the chord sequences first. I'm using them as a building block to lead me into the Stage 1 songs from the Beginners Songbook. I want to feel confident / comfortable with chord changes before I start trying to remember chords for songs and play along.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: scorpio58 on July 04, 2016, 08:25:44 pm
I am a couple of months in and I have currently got a/e/d chord changes to around 55/65 per minute.

I don't follow a particular structure, ie sometimes I'll do a-d, e-a, d-e etc and just mix it up, I also spend a lot of time doing rhythmn work with 4 bar changes not necessarily songs but just practicing rhythmn.

I also do some of the songs from beginners stage one, but only strumming as I currently find it impossible to sing/strum/keep rhythmn simultaneously - but I am working on it.

Having now added on the Amin/Dmin/Emin chords I find changes much more difficult, particularly Dmin to   and from almost any chord (curently only around 30 - 40 per minute) ;- however, having gone through the process with a/e/d I know with practice and application it will come.

This to me this is the beauty of this course (if you are patient enough and put in the time) you will build the ability to achieve things which you felt were impossible when you first started out - full of excitement, dreams and expectation but no ability what-so-ever.

Stick with it - I believe it really does work. Practice what is difficult. Frequent small batches of practice are really beneficial. Consolidate all the time.

Good luck.

Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: ajc24 on July 08, 2016, 10:36:46 pm
Hi everyone!

And so today marks 10 days since I started practicing Stage 1 and, in that short space of time, I have to admit that I'm amazed at the difference that the 1 minute changes have already started to make. I'm consistently hitting 50+ to 60 changes on D to A, D to E and A to E now and am working hard on trying to make the changes smoother, cleaner and more consistent instead of rushed and sloppy like they were for the first week.

Now I'm halfway through the 2nd week I'm amazed by the difference. My rhythm is improving (although not perfect) and my changes are smoother. Definitely. Even that troublesome D has started to work. I can even manage the 18 minute long Stage 1 practice in full without having to stop whereas I used to be able to do 1 and a half mins to 2 mins max at a time before my fingers would give out.

A few people here have already said to me to stick with it and I'd see the improvements from consistently working on the 1 minute changes.

I can safely say guys - great advice. It's definitely working  :D

Not ready for Stage 2 yet... want to consolidate Stage 1 a bit more first and learn a song or two properly but slowly getting there!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: tobyjenner on July 08, 2016, 10:56:36 pm
Great news ajc but don't think you have to do the stage practice schedules non stop. Just work through each routine then break for a minute or two in between, it'll be better for you in the long run.  8)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: ajc24 on July 09, 2016, 12:24:32 am
Great news ajc but don't think you have to do the stage practice schedules non stop. Just work through each routine then break for a minute or two in between, it'll be better for you in the long run.  8)

Oh I do. I should have been clearer - there is a mini-break in between all segments in the practice schedule :) I'm marking everything off in a spreadsheet to track my progress so I always take a minute or two to fill it in, look at what's next and then reset my timer and get back at it again!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: dgc94 on July 11, 2016, 09:28:45 am
Hi folks,

I'm 3 days into guitar practice and have become familiar with the D,A and E chord that Justin has taught me. I know where my fingers have to go ( I still have to look at them of course) so I don't have to look at books to figure out where my fingers are supposed to be. I understand that I should be working on 1 minute changes now which I have been doing for the past day.

 When Justin says "Don't worry if the Chords aren't perfect, it's about getting your fingers to move fast", what should the minimum standard be? Is it OKAY if not all the strings ring out perfectly, so long as the fingers are on the right strings and right frets? What mistakes are acceptable to make?

One difficulty I'm having is trying to keep my thumb from sliding up the back of the neck. It's taking a lot of effort to keep my thumb low, and I feel like I want to raise my thumb in order to keep the strings right on the tips, as my thumb being raised stops me from muting other strings. Is it okay to let my thumb climb now or should I really focus on keeping it low and allowing it to continue to strengthen my hand?

Thanks in advance for everyones help, I hope it is okay that I have asked these questions here, this is my first time here navigating the forum. Really enjoying learning the guitar and loving the journey of learning my first instrument.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Lord_Gigabyte on July 11, 2016, 03:13:13 pm
Hello dgc94 and welcome.

I've struggled with the question "what's acceptable to hear" when it comes to the chords.

I've gotten this advice: if they sound ok, it's good. If it's absolute rubbish, it doesn't count. In time, and with practice, the chords will sound better and better. Just keep at it, that's the trick really. And it works for me.

About the thumb; i try to keep some distance between the back of the neck and my thumb. As Justin says, it will strenghten your hand and i believe it does.  So i keep an eye out for that as well.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: dgc94 on July 11, 2016, 03:30:36 pm
Okay, some solid advice, thanks pal. Not that I try to compare my progress against others because it can get a bit disheartening, but as a complete beginner, what should be an acceptable number chords played for each combination? 3 days in, I am playing about 8-10 good chords per minute, and 12 chords per minute when switching between A-E.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: scorpio58 on July 11, 2016, 09:12:01 pm
There isn't "an acceptable" number of changes after any specific period of time.

This isn't a test, this isn't a competition, this is about each and every one one of us learning to play the guitar to the best of our ability/commitment with massively varied end games in sight from " I'd like to learn half a dozen songs to strum along with at a BBQ" to "I want to make (insert favourite guitarist) look like an amateur".

Whatever your particular goals are you may initially feel they are actually getting further away as you struggle with the very basics, but..........

Stick with it.

Do the programme.

Put in the (small blocks of) time.

I don't think it matters how many chord changes you are doing after week 1 or week 2 etc; what matters is that you don't move on until you are ready.

And there is much more to it than just chord changes - strumming, rhythm, etc.

It's not easy, but it's not a race, and I believe this system works (well it does for me anyway).

So, don't knock yourself out about how many chord changes etc after two weeks, it will come.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: dgc94 on July 11, 2016, 09:54:57 pm
Okay, thanks for the confidence booster. I'm going to stick with the 18 minute practice routine with stage one and work on getting my chord changes nailed and sounding good. I'm going to stop worrying about progression time and just enjoy the journey of learning. Thanks for your input my friend.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: ajc24 on July 15, 2016, 02:41:46 pm
Hi everyone!

I've just graduated myself to Stage 2. I feel that I'm ready for it... and have already hit a slight issue between my Dm and A chords.

You just knew Dm would be involved, didn't you? :)

When listening to Justins videos, he mentions that you effectively have an anchor finger between Dm and A in that your ring finger never moves from the 2nd string (it just alternates between frets 2 and 3).

I have to be honest... because I find that A is quite compacted in how you need to have your index finger on the 3rd string and 2nd finger on the 4th string - I just find it really difficult to use my ring finger as an anchor and be able to work my other fingers into place in time for even the slowest of bpm.

What I've found much more helpful for me, personally, is to effectively bring in an "air-change" right now and take all fingers off after strumming Dm and then replace them all at the same time on the correct strings for A.

I can get this to work more regularly than trying to use an anchor finger and slide it back and place my other fingers around it. Now it's a bit rough (ie. very rough) and needs practice (remember I'm only starting Stage 2 for the first time today) but I can get it to work.

What do you guys think I should do here? Practice hard on the anchor finger idea at a slower bpm until I can make it work? Or keep practicing, as I did today, by lifting all fingers off and go straight to A with all fingers down at the same time?

I just don't want to get into a bad habit too early on into this stage. Stage 2 is going to take me a while to crack and I really want to get it right from day one.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: tobyjenner on July 15, 2016, 04:07:50 pm
Good that you can do the 'air' change but as you say its the first day on stage 2 so if I was you I'd keep working at using the anchor. I know I founds these early changes hard but after a few days or weeks practice they all fell into place. There will plenty of times were things don't happen automatically and you have to work long and hard to achieve the goal but in the end it'll be worth it.

Toby
 8)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Sweed77 on July 15, 2016, 09:04:14 pm
Toby is spot on here, stick with learning the anchors.  It is hard at first but pays huge dividends over time.  Do 'em slowly and it will work out. 
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: ajc24 on July 15, 2016, 09:26:34 pm
Hi guys,

Thanks for the quick replies and excellent advice. I'll stick with the anchor finger, then, for this stage.
I'm going to make this work... will take time but I know I can get it right.

Thanks again :)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Laila on July 17, 2016, 10:38:29 am
Hi guys,

Thanks for the quick replies and excellent advice. I'll stick with the anchor finger, then, for this stage.
I'm going to make this work... will take time but I know I can get it right.

Thanks again :)
Hiya! I'm on the same stage as you, and I'm trying to be diligent about working on the changes I find the hardest, and skipping the easy ones. Once I have a change up to say, more than 40 three consecutive days I'll start working on another one. It's slow going, but writing down the results every time really works. It's the only way I can see the progress that actually is going on.

Anyway. I'm doing a couple of the changes as air changes, but not anything where I can use an anchor finger. It can feel very clumsy sometimes, but I think the fewer fingers I have to re-place, the faster I make progress on a particular change.

I have another question. I started out keeping my hand in one position, mainly to keep control of my thumb. On some changes it's easier if I reposition my hand a little instead of stretching my fingers a lot, say Dm to E. Is this good or bad technique, or doesn't it matter?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: shadowscott007 on July 17, 2016, 12:14:52 pm
I have another question. I started out keeping my hand in one position, mainly to keep control of my thumb. On some changes it's easier if I reposition my hand a little instead of stretching my fingers a lot, say Dm to E. Is this good or bad technique, or doesn't it matter?

You want to allow your hand to reposition as you change chords.  Watch some of Justin's song lessons and watch how his hand moves as he goes from chord to chord.  Turn the volume all the way down, no sound really helps you to focus visually on what is going on with his hands.  There is quite a lot of movement in his hand.

Shadow
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Laila on July 17, 2016, 12:17:45 pm
Ok, great. Thanks, shadow.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: JO3Y on July 20, 2016, 08:28:20 am
So, I am a beginner and I was practising the one minute changes from D to A chord. I did 18 on my first try, and then went up to 21 on the second (while I simultaneously focused on strumming the correct strings). But when I decided to not focus on the strumming and to focus only on the finger changes, I went up to 28 in a minute.

My question is whether I should be focusing on the strumming as well as the finger changes or just the finger changes for each chord while practising the one minute changes?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Buckeye1971 on July 20, 2016, 09:11:36 am
Hello JO3Y and welcome to the forum,

My suggestion would be to continue strumming while doing your chord changes. In order to play songs you will need to strum and play chords in concert with one another so you might as well nail down that skill as early as possible. IMHO.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: JO3Y on July 20, 2016, 09:34:10 am
Hey  Buckeye1971, thank you for the quick reply. Yeah, I will focus on both from now on  :)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Rossco01 on July 20, 2016, 01:40:04 pm
But the aim of the 1 minute changes is to get muscle memory and speed working as quickly as possible so you should be aiming to go A > D > A > D as quickly as possible with one strum on A, then one strum on D and then back to A. 1 minute changes is also about speed rather than accuracy. You should have a separate step in your practice routing to practice getting the chords sounding nice and clear.

In terms of strumming you can practice that as part of the RUST (really useful strumming technique) lessons which are also part of each stage. obviously as part of this you can incorporate your A and D chords.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Drubbing on July 20, 2016, 02:09:40 pm
My question is whether I should be focusing on the strumming as well as the finger changes or just the finger changes for each chord while practising the one minute changes?

It's not a race to see how fast you can get, and how quickly you can get there. The chord has to sound good, so the strumming is just as important as clean changes.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: JO3Y on July 21, 2016, 10:37:28 am
Hey guys,

First off, thanks for all the advice. Yes I do understand that it's not a race, but isn't the whole point of one minute changes to increase muscle memory rather than accuracy of the chord?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: ajc24 on July 21, 2016, 10:58:39 am
It's not a race to see how fast you can get, and how quickly you can get there. The chord has to sound good, so the strumming is just as important as clean changes.
Drubbing has it spot on JO3Y.

By all means you want the changes to be fast and Justin does say that if the changes are a little scruffy (when you strum them) then that's OK as you are building up your speed. But ideally you want a solid mix of both worlds ie. a fast, clean change with a good, clean chord strummed at the end.

When you are playing chord sequences / songs you need to have both qualities - this is where the one minute changes give you that chance to build up your speed while maintaining a clean chord.

Strumming with the chord change is so important, in my opinion, even if they are just down strums. For the one minute changes, even for me who is still a pure beginner (currently struggling through Stage 2), I can't recommend anything other than strumming with your chord change.

It's slowly working for me. It takes time and practice but I can already feel that I'm playing the chord sequences / songs better - even at my beginners level.

Also, if you don't both change chord and strum - how can you really tell that your chord change was correct and/or clean and therefore count it as a clean change?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Drubbing on July 21, 2016, 11:30:49 am
Hey guys,

First off, thanks for all the advice. Yes I do understand that it's not a race, but isn't the whole point of one minute changes to increase muscle memory rather than accuracy of the chord?

Both, but the latter is far more important, because repetition over time forms muscle memory anyway. Drills like this are just to get you started and provide focussed practice and mini goals.

What is the point of developing muscle memory for chords that don't sound clean because you were chasing numbers? You go as fast as you can making clean chords, or the muscle memory will ingrain the mistakes.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: SiegeFrog on July 21, 2016, 02:13:20 pm
I think the OP is being misunderstood. As I read it, when he says strumming accuracy, he means just that. When he plays a D sometimes he hits 3 strings. Sometimes 4, sometimes 5. Similarly for the A chord. He's not saying he's changing chords without strumming them. He's also not saying that the chords are sounding horrible. Solely the number of strings being played is inconsistent. Correct me if I'm wrong.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Rossco01 on July 21, 2016, 04:24:14 pm
From Justins practice schedule for stage 1

"Chord Practice
The point of this exercise is to get your chords sounding clear, and to train your fingers to go to exactly the right spot to get each chord sounding great.
• Start with a strum, then pick each note individually, and then strum again.
• Don't play any strings that have the X next to them in the chord diagram.
• Try to play the notes with the tips of your fingers.
• Remember that dead-sounding notes need to be fixed, and the usual causes are either:
        a) The finger is too far from the fret.
        b) One of your fingers is touching a string that it shouldn't.

Move your fingers around as you pick out the strings until they all sound good and then strum the chord again; as you play the last strum, tell your fingers that this is how you want them to go next time. It will look a little strange to anyone that is watching you, but it really helps! ;)

One Minute Changes
The object of this exercise is to get your fingers moving quickly. Although you should be trying to get the fingers in the perfect positions that you have been working on in your chord practice, if they are a little sloppy it is OK, we are working up the speed here!

The important thing here is to practise the chord changes that you struggle with the most. In your practice schedule you should write in the amount of changes that you made in that practice session. Make sure you use your timer, and push yourself to go as fast as possible."
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on July 21, 2016, 04:30:39 pm
I think the OP is being misunderstood. As I read it, when he says strumming accuracy, he means just that. When he plays a D sometimes he hits 3 strings. Sometimes 4, sometimes 5. Similarly for the A chord. He's not saying he's changing chords without strumming them. He's also not saying that the chords are sounding horrible. Solely the number of strings being played is inconsistent. Correct me if I'm wrong.

If this is the case he should still try and strum the chords correctly. D chord 4 strings only, A chord 5 strings only.
Practice makes Permanent so if you're practicing mistakes you are learning mistakes.
 
The whole idea of the one minute change is to learn how to change chords quickly. If you're not playing
the chords correctly your not practicing changing chords your practicing making mistakes.

A person doing 20 bad changes and 3 good changes a minute is doing 3 changes a minute not 23
changes. Justin even says not to count the crap changes, so if you are doing 21 correct changes a
minute verses 28 with 7 bad changes your still only doing 21 changes a minute.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Buckeye1971 on July 21, 2016, 04:32:19 pm
Quote
I think the OP is being misunderstood. As I read it, when he says strumming accuracy, he means just that. When he plays a D sometimes he hits 3 strings. Sometimes 4, sometimes 5. Similarly for the A chord. He's not saying he's changing chords without strumming them. He's also not saying that the chords are sounding horrible. Solely the number of strings being played is inconsistent. Correct me if I'm wrong.

I think that is what he meant as well Siegefrog. My opinion is that he should try to be as accurate on his strumming to avoid developing a bad habit of hitting the wrong strings when he strums.

As far as the actual chord changes go,  it is exactly what Rossco01 posted from Justin's Practice schedule.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: oliyan on July 25, 2016, 03:34:25 am
Hi,
     How do I know whether I strum the correct number of strings for each chord? I'm on stage 2 now, and I just believe that my strumming is right.

When I'm learning certain chord changes for the first time, I normally do 25, 30 changes. During that phase I actually look at the strumming hand, and I do it right.

But when I'm chasing the clock to do as much chord changes as possible, I rather don't mind about the strumming side at all. I only concentrate on the fretting side. I know this is not so right, and I wanna know is there any special way to check whether I strum right for every changes?

Thanks in advance,
Oliyan.

Sent from my MI PAD using Tapatalk
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: ajc24 on July 25, 2016, 09:33:25 pm
I'm still working on Stage 2 myself - just trying to get a few of the chord changes tidied up and I should be able to move onto Stage 3 so here's what I found worked for myself (given we're at similar levels):

When I'm doing my One Minute Changes, I take it quite slow and steady at first. I ensure that I'm getting clean chords along with the strumming the correct strings. Now it's not 100% perfect - I'm too inexperienced for that at this early stage. But 95% of the time I do manage to strum the correct strings. During both Stage 1 and 2, I spend (easily) a week to two weeks on 30 changes per minute max.

Once I feel comfortable with changing the chords cleanly, I only then gradually start increasing my speed until I hit 60 changes per minute or above (counting Am as 1, Dm as 2, Am as 3, Dm as 4... etc). I actually find that I can increase my rate quite quickly by taking it so slowly at first.

I don't treat the One Minute Changes as an exercise to race as fast as possible for at least that first week to two weeks as I found that when I do that, my chord changes get ugly and sloppy and my strumming is atrocious.

Justin (and other members of the forum) always promote the idea of playing slow in order to play fast. It's definitely a rule that I have found has worked for me when doing the One Minute Changes.

As I say, I'm still not strumming perfectly on every change (I assume that will come as I increase my experience with playing) but I feel I'm bang on a good 95% of the time.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Rossco01 on July 27, 2016, 11:43:07 am
Well done ajc that approach is definitely what I'd advocate. That "play it slow approach first" works even when you've got good experience. For trickier stuff I play it slow, make sure I'm doing it right then try to speed it up.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: ajc24 on July 27, 2016, 09:21:33 pm
Well done ajc that approach is definitely what I'd advocate. That "play it slow approach first" works even when you've got good experience. For trickier stuff I play it slow, make sure I'm doing it right then try to speed it up.

A good friend of mine who is an exceptional guitar player tells me the same thing - play slow to play fast.

That being said, I'm still finding Stage 2 very tricky. A to Dm is causing me all sorts of problems, in particular, and I'm still a bit sloppy on and off with my changes to D from any chord. D is especially frustrating as I can get it right most of the time (and I had it good enough to pass Stage 1) but then I let myself down with a few awful changes to it intermittently. I really want to tidy some of that up during Stage 2.

More slow, steady practice has been planned for the coming weeks to get me through this stage. It's going to take a while for me to get past this stage. Those few tricky changes just aren't good enough yet to move on to any more new stuff.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: sloonark on August 25, 2016, 10:32:16 am
I've been learning for three weeks now following the beginners course. I've been making very slow progress but my chords are still pretty messy.

What I've noticed in the last couple of days is if I strum with my thumb instead of a pick, things seem to sound better. I'm not sure if this is because a thumb-strum is softer and more forgiving than a pick-strum? Would this be true?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on August 25, 2016, 06:32:09 pm
I've been learning for three weeks now following the beginners course. I've been making very slow progress but my chords are still pretty messy.

What I've noticed in the last couple of days is if I strum with my thumb instead of a pick, things seem to sound better. I'm not sure if this is because a thumb-strum is softer and more forgiving than a pick-strum? Would this be true?

Strumming to hard with a pick will always sound bad and make mistakes stand out. Strumming with your
thumb will deaden the strings so things like fret buzz and off notes not as noticeable.
Try strumming softer with your pick and see what happens.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Purple Turtle on September 09, 2016, 09:22:13 pm
I don't know if this has been mentioned before, but it's a little tiresome to read through a dozen pages of comments sadly, however, I will still share what I've considered to be a great variation to this method.

I was playing along to the metronome switching between chords to try to smooth out my changes within songs, then wondering how I'd fair by just switching between two chords like one minute changes and behold, it did actually hold some level of improvement!! I think this is like the forced changes that's mentioned in a later lesson, but is a little more intensive and could work better (maybe).

So I think do the one minute chord changes and see how many you can do within the minute and even practice the changes a little bit then set the metronome to say 30BPM or if that's too much, 25 will be alright. You'll then change every time it clicks and once you can do that solidly, you can move up to 40, 50 or even 60. The reason I think this is great is many beginners will look at their chord making sure it's perfect and then look at their strings so they're not ringing that low E on the D chord which wastes so much time! When you've got the metronome going, you've only 2 seconds to do everything when you're on 30BPM and it gets harder and harder until all you can do is switch the chord.

I've not managed to get to the 60 BPM on this yet, but I reckon it will speed up my process!!

Tl;dr

1. Practice changes a couple days
2. Set metronome to 30BPM
3. Do one change per click
4. Succeed
5. Speed up
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Rossco01 on September 10, 2016, 10:44:00 am
Purple what your actually doing using the metronome is what Justin suggests, which is 1 min changes are about speed rather than accuracy ( you practice accuracy separately ). By using the metronome your reinforcing this as if you miss a click it sort of tells you you stopped when you should have continued. Sounds like a good way of reinforcing what you should do. It'll also help when you start practicing scales.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: kvp1987 on September 21, 2016, 04:13:33 pm
Hi, While practicing 1 minute changes I tend to look at my fretting hand and then strum correct number of strings. Is it right to look at both hands for each and every chord change? 
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on September 21, 2016, 04:46:51 pm
If you can't make chord changes yet the one minute change exercise is a waste of your time.
You should be doing the pluck strum exercise until you can do the changes then start the
one minute change exercise.
The one minute change exercise isn't for learning chords it's for learning to change chords quickly
so you can play songs.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: ajc24 on September 21, 2016, 09:43:23 pm
This is more-so a rant... well, just a little moan, perhaps :) I just need to get this off of my chest.

Damn it if it's that D chord again. I had thought that I had cracked the D chord with all chords from Stages 1 and 2 but do you know which one is catching me out in Stage 3? G to D. For some reason, I just can't seem to crack that one. I'm slow, clumsy and awkward. I can do C to D no problem. In fact, most changes to D are at least "good" with some being "very good" (at least in my mind) but G to D? Damn it if I can get it to work.

I'm not exactly sure why G to D is causing such a problem. I've added additional 1 minute changes to my schedule. I've picked songs with G to D involved in it to practice it further. But it's just not happening. I think my issue is with moving my first and second fingers from the thickest 2 strings on the guitar to the thinnest two. I've not had to make such a big move with these fingers yet. I can only put it down to that.

Ahhhhh! Well... onwards and upwards I suppose. I'm not even 2 full weeks into Stage 3 yet (I've missed a few days due to holidays and other arrangements so my schedule has been a bit stop / start) so maybe it will come to me in time. In fact, I know it will.

But this has definitely been my most frustrating change so far. Surprise surprise it includes that bloody D chord.

I didn't have this trouble with Dm... I found Dm to be OK. C? Fine. G? Took a few days but generally fine (in fact it's quite solid now). But still struggling with D intermittently 3 stages in...
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Rossco01 on September 21, 2016, 10:57:27 pm
Keep going ajc it will come. Sounds like you're doing the right thing, it just takes time. Believe me 6 months down the road and you wont be thinking about it at all. Make sure you're learning songs as well. Learning songs makes you think more about the song sometimes than it does the change so your fingers might more naturally move (not always the case). If not then at least learning an interesting song will probably make you persist.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Dr Winterbourne on September 22, 2016, 12:22:50 pm
If you are really struggling, you could try using the 4 fingered G, from stage 8. It is your standard G, but with you ring finger on the 3rd fret of the B string. This way, you can use it as an anchor. This is a really common thing in 80s power ballads.

As mentioned though, in a few months G to D won't seem like a big deal.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: ajc24 on September 22, 2016, 09:24:44 pm
Keep going ajc it will come. Sounds like you're doing the right thing, it just takes time. Believe me 6 months down the road and you wont be thinking about it at all. Make sure you're learning songs as well.

Thanks for the advice :) I realise that it will take time... just have to be patient. Have to try not to get frustrated with it.

I am also learning songs too (or at the very least, trying to play them). I've selected Hey Joe and Brown Eyed Girl as the main focus in the Stage 3 songs as 1) they contain chord sequences which contain G and C which are the main chords introduced in Stage 3 and 2) they contain that dreaded G to D switch that has caused me so much frustration so far.

If you are really struggling, you could try using the 4 fingered G, from stage 8. It is your standard G, but with you ring finger on the 3rd fret of the B string.

Also thank you for the advice :) However I don't think I'll try the 4 fingered G just yet. I am aware of that version of G and have tried it before - the DVD that came with one of my acoustic guitars actually introduces that G from the get go. But for now I think I'll stick with the G that Justin introduced in this stage. I don't want to stray too far from his course.

As mentioned though, in a few months G to D won't seem like a big deal.

Yep, that's my hope :)

While practicing today - and after my rant on here the other day - I decided to really watch my switch between G and D and try and determine why I'm having such an issue with it. I think I've found where my difficulty is. It's actually my ring finger. Because I'm having to bring my first and second fingers down to the thinnest 3 strings and kind of go around the back of my ring finger (which just has to move from the thinnest E to the B string) - it's that movement that's causing me the problem.

What I've also done - in addition to putting in some more 1 minute changes involving G to D into my schedule - is brought in a further additional 2 minute "chord practice" where I'm very slowly moving between G (I don't strum, pick, strum on G in this case) to D (where I strum, pick, strum), back to G (no strum or picking) and then try go back to D (strum, pick, strum)... basically focus on that change very slowly for 2 minutes and try to get the movement right and gain some confidence with it.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: sdd56 on September 26, 2016, 10:17:13 am
Hi - I am currently 5 weeks into stage 1, but can only do about 35 on the 1 minute changes.

But I find if I use my thumb instead of a pick, I am quicker (45+ changes per minute). Without any strum, I can do 60 changes, so my fingers are getting quicker.

This is because when using a pick I have to spend time looking to see that I strum the correct strings - strumming with the thumb, I don't need to look.

kvp1987 (a few posts above) seemed to have a similar problem, and I am a bit confused about the answer given by stitch.

The 5 minute strum/pick/strum is intended to practise making good chords, while the 1 minute changes are to increase speed of the fretting fingers?
Surely it is valid to practise both at the same time?

I am at the point where I feel I should be moving to the next stage, is it valid to use the figures obtained using thumb as a benchmark? Or should I spend more time making strumming with a pick more automatic (it will happen in time I'm sure).

Any advice much appreciated.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Joerfe on September 26, 2016, 11:54:39 am
Sdd56, playing with or without a pick is totally up to you. You have plenty of guitarists playing with a pick and many without (Mark Knpfler springs to mind).
You need to decide how you will play down the line. Without a pick, move along. With a pick, get it sorted now and take that little bit longer to get it right.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: m_c on September 26, 2016, 12:01:48 pm
SDD, the one minute changes is so you concentrate on building speed.
The strum/pick/strum is for concentrating on quality.

Ultimately the two merge, but for now concentrate on each separately, and don't worry too much about catching extra strings while doing the one minute changes. As with all things, your technique will improve with practise.

Personally, I wouldn't let one or two relatively minor things, like what you mention from holding you back from the next stage.
As you are aware of the weakness, keep working on it, but don't let it hold you back from progressing in other areas.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: sdd56 on September 26, 2016, 07:55:04 pm
Thanks for the replies - I want to use a pick normally, so will persist with it - although I had a go just now without looking at my right hand and was surprised to find I could hit the right strings most of the time!

m_c: Yes that's what I thought - I am working on both so hopefully it will all join up in the end!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: baxy on November 01, 2016, 02:33:52 pm
Wow it seems some of you guys are flying!!!!
I picked up a guitar for the first time on Tuesday 25th October. I've taken Justin's advice and I am practicing around 15-20 minutes a day plus a few 5 minutes strums before bedtime.
I'm on BC-115 and today's chord changes are recorded, I started this lesson 2 days ago. 
A-D=21
D-E=22
A-E=19
I only count good changes.......

My question is, should I continue with the changes until I perfect around 60 a minute or should I move onto the next lesson. I am happy to keep practicing the 1 minute changes and also try other methods suggested like timing myself on how long it takes to do 60 changes.

BTW last week I thought a D chord was the male version of the G String......forgive my ignorance       
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Rossco01 on November 01, 2016, 02:59:29 pm
Baxy you're doing fine REMEMBER their are two exercises for learning chords. The first is to make sure you've got the finger placement right and all strings are ringing properly - this is the pick and strum. The second is 1 min changes to improve speed and get the muscle memory right. As you'll have seen in numerous posts you need to judge what is good and what is bad on this one but I'd count okay ones as well. Perfection is not what you'll get at this stage if you want to get faster.

If you know all the material in a stage their is nothing wrong in starting to read the next stage. Justin does include for each stage a guide as to when to move on and for stage 1 (I've copied it below) it's 40 changes BUT it's only a guide. It'll take you longer to build up to 60 changes but you'll get bored if that's all you do.

When to move to the Next Stage
It's very hard for me to define the point at which you should move onto the next stage. You should understand the content of this stage, but many skills will develop over the course as well.

The real answer is to move on when YOU feel ready. However, I know that it can be hard to tell when you feel ready or not! So, here are some suggestions as to what you should have accomplished before moving on:

• You should know all the chords from this stage, D, A and E, from memory.
• You should have them sounding good (if not perfect), with most of the notes sounding out most of the time.
• You should have your One-Minute changes to at least 40 changes in a minute (20 x the pair of changes).
• You should be able to play one or two of the songs from the songbook, even if you have to start and stop a little bit here and there.

Beware of trying to perfect every stage, as that will just lead to a feeling of hopelessness! I'm still trying to perfect simple things, and to be honest, I don't think we ever stop improving, so there is no ‘end game' – don't wait until every chord is PERFECT, be happy with good. Perfect will come later! That said, don't be moving on if you are sloppy as a wet sandwich either!

Hope that helps you decide when to move on!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Tedsthename on November 01, 2016, 04:19:37 pm
Quick question, I'm doing ok on my one minute changes with the fretting hand, even if I ignore my strumming hand and completely flub most of my strums (right around 30 per minute) I'm still getting decent finger placement for the cords. But if I slow down and try to get both cord and strum right I'm getting very low 20's and it's still kind of sloppy.

So the question is should I work on getting cord and strum right on the changes at this stage or should I just concentrate on getting my fretting hand moving quickly?

Thanks guys!
Ted
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on November 01, 2016, 04:52:03 pm
To play a chord properly it need to be fretted and strummed correctly.
If you practice bad technique you are learning bad technique.
You should be doing the pluck strum pluck until you can play the chord.
Then work on speed.
It says right in the lesson to only count good changes so if your doing 30
bad changes a minute your count should be 0.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: baxy on November 02, 2016, 07:30:34 pm
Hi Tedsthename. I've moved onto the rhythm section as I found my changes have halted somewhat. For me doing the rhythm has helped massively with my changes.
ie, my strumming hand is getting used to strumming from the fourth string on D, fifth string on A and sixth string on E. This means now I don't have to pay much attention to my strumming hand and concentrate on my frets.
I also decided to take the timer out of the equation for practising the changes. This relaxed me and took the pressure out of beating my last score. Today I've been picking up my guitar and putting it down every hour or so and practising for 5-10 minutes each stint. Having just timed myself,  I've gone from low 20's per minute to high 20's in 24 hours with the D-A registering 32.
It works for me but I have no idea if it works for others.

If I am advising a bad habit please can the experienced guys let me know.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Tedsthename on November 03, 2016, 04:54:38 pm
Thanks Baxy. I spent a little time on google trying to find proper strumming technique since I think Justin glosses over this a bit and should do a video on it, or add it to the "how to hold a pick" video. Opinions vary widely as to what proper technique is I've learned, but I did figure out I was keeping my wrist locked and only using arm movement to strum, and I was hitting the strings way too hard because of that unless I went really slow. I spent about a half hour (till my fingers started getting a bit sore) the other day just practicing strumming while keeping my wrist relaxed and letting it help a bit instead of all the movement coming from my elbow and am now it's sounding much better. Still strumming a bit too hard when I rush but I'm working on it.

After my chord practice and changes I'm also working on rhythm now too, with foot tapping to keep time. Doing better, hitting the right strings most of the time and sounding decent most of the time but my eyes still have to dart back and forth to make sure. I don't expect that to change until the muscle memory kicks in so I'm not trying to force it. Learned Elvis' Hound Dog, just have to work on getting through it clean and up to speed now :)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Tedsthename on November 09, 2016, 06:18:16 pm
Ok, I was stuck around 30 changes and my strums still sounded "off" and couldn't put my finger on why. Went back to google with guitar in hand and after multiple youtube videos I finally put my finger on it. I was strumming too slow and trying to strum too softly (which made me brush over the top missing strings too often).

I went back to strumming a little harder and on one video the  guy said you want it to sound like you hit all the strings at once and not be able to hear the individual strings as you strum at full speed. THAT is what made it click and now it actually sounds right when I "play". OMG I've been frustrated to no end for over a week and was thinking of taking a private lesson just to have someone be able to tell me what I was doing wrong, but now I think I've got it! I'm so happy right now.

Went back and did my 1 min. changes again and went from the fastest being 30 to the slowest being 39. I was taking just as much time doing the strum (and not having it sound good) as I was moving the fretting hand into position before, so now as soon as my fingers are in place  I "hit through" the strings and not only am I much faster it sounds much better that way too!

Anyway, I'm just real happy about it and wanted to share in case this helps anyone else. I'm still going to do slow strums on my strum/pick/strum cord practice but for everything else now I'm going to work on keeping that accuracy with the quick strums.

Oh, one more thing I figured out to help with accuracy when not strumming through all 6 chords. Mute the strings you want to play (and only those strings) and just strum away. Then if you accidentally hit an extra string you can hear it ring out loud and clear and adjust accordingly.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: The_Hodge75 on November 15, 2016, 04:16:29 pm
Just moved on to stage two, really interesting to see how the 1 minute chord changes helps you adapt between them all, not just the specific chords you are practicing!! ;D

I tried playing guitar 6 years ago but was too impatient, following it to the letter this time and a little every day. I think this is helping massively, long may it continue!!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Rossco01 on November 15, 2016, 04:40:27 pm
TedstheName if you haven't already found them in the course then strumming is covered in the Rhythm guitar lessons in the course. As a general guide think of how you would use a paint brush to paint a wall or something, you would have upstrokes and downstrokes and angle the brush accordingly. It's the same with the pick.

The_Hodge75 Sounds like you're going fine. Patience and practice is the key. 1 minute changes will start to get you to a point where you can play songs. Everything on the course layers on top of each other. So sometimes it might not make sense why something is done in a certain part of the course....later it makes absolute sense.

General advice start learning songs once you've got A, D and E sorted out. The beginners song book is the best place to start.

Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: jakecool23 on January 23, 2017, 04:23:27 am
I'm on stage 2 i am pretty good at the one minute change's but I go so fast I mess the chord up not the position of the chord just like not push the strings down hard enough to get a clear note is this OK? I know one minute change's are for speed but I just need to know cause I can play the chords clearly when I'm not doing one minute change's thanks
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: DarrellW on January 23, 2017, 05:14:32 am
If you're messing up most changes then you need to slow down, it's not just about speed it's accuracy as well and that includes the chord being clean. If it's just the odd one then OK but if it's most then slow down until they are mostly clean.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: TruckFump on January 23, 2017, 08:35:34 pm
Hey Gang:

Am moving up to stage 3 in the Beginner's Course and have an ongoing concern.  It seems that the conventional wisdom out there is to--from the outset--train your fingers to form chords as a unit and not by placing fingers individually/sequentially.  In one of the Stage 3 videos, Justin says not to worry about that; it'll be taught later.  This seems like learning the incorrect habit, only to painfully re-train later in the correct way.  As a result, I've modified my 1-minute changes exercises so that rather than, for example, switching A D E D for a minute, I do AA DD EE DD.  Between each rep of a chord (e.g., between A and A), I lift my fingers about a millimeter off the strings and try to place them back down as a unit.  Then I switch over to D D. 

However, I'm more than willing to heed the advice of those who actually know what they're doing if you think this is counter-productive.  So....by forming chords with individual fingers, am I creating a problem?  And at what point in the course does Justin begin to emphasize chord formation as a unit?  Thanks!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: DarrellW on January 23, 2017, 08:50:26 pm
There's nothing wrong with what you're doing, if you're getting better at changing without putting your fingers down one at a time you will naturally speed up. In real terms you will progress quicker when you get it.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bo-jingle on January 23, 2017, 09:33:55 pm
I lift my fingers about a millimeter off the strings and try to place them back down as a unit.

I think that is a good technique and is probably damping the strings as well.  Slightly lifting your fingers mutes the notes and is a neat addition to playing techniques.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: SiegeFrog on January 23, 2017, 11:29:54 pm
What you're describing is Air Changes. Justin teaches them in Stage 5. If you're really anxious to start then try a different exercise. Form the chord on the guitar. Take your fret hand off the guitar and tap your knee. Reform the chord on the guitar. Repeat. The challenge is to reform the chord after tapping your knee. By just bouncing the chord up and down on the fretboard you're not doing much to get it into muscle memory. You need to completely break it down before reforming.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Maiters1 on January 24, 2017, 01:31:08 pm
i started the guitar one month ago and have struggled getting my chord changes faster.  Here is something i found useful.  Since i had only gotten up to around 25 changes, i set my metronome to 20 and didn't try to change as fast as i could, but rather only change at each count.  once i had that sounding good at 20, i went to 30 and so on

Hopefully this will be useful to some
I can vouch for this method , I use it also and my changes shot up initially until it gets in the fifty' s then it goes up in small increments of 2-4 at a time . But this method really helps it seems to bring a sense of calm to it and you seem to have more time if that make any sense ??? You don't have to try and cram the change, which if being honest probably won't sound very clean either ,when using a metronome you just need to worry about getting your fingers sorted before the click , just set the tempo and start after a count of two clicks and away you  go
good luck !


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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Sina86 on February 09, 2017, 03:39:19 pm
Hi, I'm in my third week of learning to play the guitar now and I've got one issue with the 1 Minute changes - when I'm playing a song - three little birds, for example - I'm doing fine with quick changes, they usually sound pretty good most of the time - or when I'm just playing around with quick changes but more than one strum. Now my problem is: when pressured for that time of getting as many changes into that minute, the chords just don't come out clean after the first five or ten changes - the only thing I could do is slow down considerably. I like the exercise and I do feel I'm benefiting greatly from it when it comes to changing chords within a song quickly, but I'm losing all accuracy as the minute ticks by :(

I'm doing 28 changes/min for D-A (56 when I count each single change) and 22 for D-E and A-E, I want to stick with it for at least another week, hoping to reach 30 (or 60 counting each chord change) by then. But should I even move on if I can't get the chords sound clean during the exercise, even though they mostly come out fine when I'm doing the strum/pick/strum exercises or working on playing songs? It's driving me insane. I'm doing so bad when I'm under pressure, because all I can think is 'go faster, go faster, go faster'.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: joueur de guitare on February 09, 2017, 03:54:35 pm
Hi, I'm in my third week of learning to play the guitar now and I've got one issue with the 1 Minute changes - when I'm playing a song - three little birds, for example - I'm doing fine with quick changes, they usually sound pretty good most of the time - or when I'm just playing around with quick changes but more than one strum. Now my problem is: when pressured for that time of getting as many changes into that minute, the chords just don't come out clean after the first five or ten changes - the only thing I could do is slow down considerably. I like the exercise and I do feel I'm benefiting greatly from it when it comes to changing chords within a song quickly, but I'm losing all accuracy as the minute ticks by :(

I'm doing 28 changes/min for D-A (56 when I count each single change) and 22 for D-E and A-E, I want to stick with it for at least another week, hoping to reach 30 (or 60 counting each chord change) by then. But should I even move on if I can't get the chords sound clean during the exercise, even though they mostly come out fine when I'm doing the strum/pick/strum exercises or working on playing songs? It's driving me insane. I'm doing so bad when I'm under pressure, because all I can think is 'go faster, go faster, go faster'.

https://justinguitarcommunity.com/index.php?topic=17112.msg356177#msg356177 (https://justinguitarcommunity.com/index.php?topic=17112.msg356177#msg356177)

Also, see post above yours on this thread.

 ;)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Laila on February 09, 2017, 06:35:50 pm
You can also try strumming four or two strums between each change to begin with. You get the same change, but with more time to plan it. Once that's smooth, switch to changing every click.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: phpadmin on February 09, 2017, 09:20:54 pm
IMHO
one minute changing is not well as a training excercise. Beginners must develop the smooth and accurate changing between the chords. But how the beginner may control - which speed he has reach? With random changing it is difficult to control the proper technique. I suggest for the beginners to use the metronome. Set the 50 bpm and change the chords on each click. When you will confident with that speed - increase to 55.  ;)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Drubbing on February 10, 2017, 09:19:24 am
1 minute changes has worked for a lot of people here, that's why it's a staple exercise of Justin's course. Just because some people struggle with it, doesn't mean it's a poor exercise. Beginners struggle with most things.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: MarcusHH on February 10, 2017, 10:34:20 am
Maybe it helps someone when I’m sharing my thoughts about Justin’s exercises in general and 1min changes in particular.

Because of the very well structured and good cost-benefit calculation of Justin’s exercises I repeatedly asked myself if Justin had professional advice or figured it out by himself.

From a psychological perspective Justin’s advice makes sense. To focus on one thing at a time helps to optimize the use of your cognitive resources. Hence, doing your speed exercise and accuracy exercise seperately helps building up specific skills and knowledge (implicit and procedural knowledge – what refers to Justin’s “muscle memory”).

As a result, using a metronome can contaminate the “speed-focus” insofar that you also take timing into account (increasing your cognitive load -> decreasing your domain-specific awareness).
As far as I’m concerned, playing songs with a metronome is richer in variety than doing 1min changes with a metronome and fulfills the same purpose.

Putting the pieces together is a long term project that develops by both time and experience. For example, learning new relatively easy songs (e.g. Beatles’ “Wanna hold your hand”) is far easier now than months ago (e.g., when I was at stage 3) and my focus shifted to new challenges (now at stage 6: F chord, picking strings, complex strumming patterns, e.g. "Sing" from Travis - a gruesome monster!).

Nevertheless, there are challenges keeping me busy since stage 1, e.g. speeding up songs: When it comes to attaining the original BPM I’m in “turtle mode” – a really hard and long way with very little steps of improvement.

As it is true for a huge bunch of psychological issues, different problem solving strategies may work for different people. In the end, everyone has to figure out his or her individual strategies that work for specific challenges.
But I think Justin’s work schedules provide extraordinary assistance and work really good for most people.

Keep groovin’!   :)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Laila on February 10, 2017, 11:52:38 am
Maybe it helps someone when I’m sharing my thoughts about Justin’s exercises in general and 1min changes in particular.

Because of the very well structured and good cost-benefit calculation of Justin’s exercises I repeatedly asked myself if Justin had professional advice or figured it out by himself.

From a psychological perspective Justin’s advice makes sense. To focus on one thing at a time helps to optimize the use of your cognitive resources. Hence, doing your speed exercise and accuracy exercise seperately helps building up specific skills and knowledge

Excellent post, and a good vibe to you for that!

I've been following this course since last spring. My thoughts on this:

- practicing chord changes slowly builds accuracy. To do this well you need to actually notice and internalize what you're doing right or wrong. This is harder to begin with, because most of us aren't used to controlling our fingers that minutely, there are physical issues that limit our range, and we make many different kinds of mistakes at the same time. After a while it's easier to notice that one is making the same type of mistake with different chords (eg not giving enough space around your wrist), and it's then easier to recognize and correct mistakes. To me this exercise is partly about giving me the confidence to know that I actually am capable of playing the chords perfectly clean, even if I don't always do so.

- practicing one-minute changes builds speed. It's mostly about moving your fingers quickly and sort of hitting the correct strings. To me this is more about the movement between the chords, not accuracy. I've usually counted almost all the changes, even though many of them gave bad chords, if my fingers were actually in the right place. Practicing speed forces different ways of setting your fingers, because you have to, and suddenly you may find yourself making a chord with different fingers first or several at a time. It's also a good way of just building a lot of repetitions. For some of us, like me, the clock ticking is very unnerving, and we tend to rush and fumble (increased cognitive load!). If so it's good to try:

- practicing one-minute changes with a metronome. For me the consistent timing makes it easier to change, and the chords are usually better, but if I have the metronome set just a little too high it's a complete waste of time. It also doesn't work very well if I'm changing between two chords where one is harder to finger (takes longer time) than the other. Those are better to do without a metronome, just to get a lot of repetition in.
Since these are so different I always note if I'm practicing a one-minute change with or without a metronome.

I do chord progressions preferably with a metronome, because that's a lot closer to actually playing songs, and for that you need a steady rhythm.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: MarcusHH on February 10, 2017, 12:18:10 pm
Laila "...you got me on my knees"!  :D
Being no longer blanked in this department...many thanks!

I totally agree with your experience, it's congruent with mine.

 
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on February 10, 2017, 05:00:06 pm
This is to all beginners.

It's really simple. If you can't play the chord slow why would you try and play it fast.
The OMC exercise was designed to practice chord changes quickly after you know
the chords and not before. Justin has the pick strum pick for learning chords.
If you missed it it's at 2:55 of the D chord lesson. This applies to every chord you
will learn not just the D.

One thing Justin said in one of his videos has stuck with me.
"Practice Makes Permanent"

So if you are doing OMC and the chords are bad you're practicing mistakes which is bad.
This also mean you're trying to go to fast. It's not a race and the only person you are hurting
is yourself.

Justin also says in his video if the change is bad don't count it. If you do 60 chord changes a minute
and 30 are bad you only count 30 so why not slow down and do 40 clean changes.

Rant over Play on abd have fun.
To quote Close
Learn Songs, Learn Songs, Learn Songs.

 
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Gingerbeardman on March 06, 2017, 05:58:15 pm
If anyone is interested, I put together an excel file to keep track of my 1 minute changes, I've shared it for anyone who wants it

Not able to post external links, so msg me if you guys want it. Comes in handy for me.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: pcgirl1965 on March 06, 2017, 08:28:14 pm
At what point is it OK to move to the next stage?  IE: How many clean chord changes? Or how fast on the Beat Exercises?  How many songs should I be able to play in each stage?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: SiegeFrog on March 07, 2017, 12:35:13 am
On the website, go to BC-119, Stage 1 practice schedule. At the end, Justin lists the goals for completing Stage 1 and advancing to Stage 2.


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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: sbenton2k2 on March 11, 2017, 07:36:39 pm
i am having loads of trouble getting above 25 or so changes....  i started guitar 9-10 days ago; my fingers tips are sore and i find i still have to watch both my left and right hands most of the time.  i know much more practice is needed

a particular issue i am having on the D chord is, i have to put finger #3 down before 1 or 2.  finger 3 is not stretchy; i stare at it trying to will it over but no luck

any advice or encouragement?  i tend to only practice 10-15 minutes at a burst due to sore finger tips.  i then try and practice 2-3 times in an evening after work

thx




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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: sbenton2k2 on March 11, 2017, 07:57:34 pm
I had the exact issue. I would suggest doing the stretchy exercises daily for a couple mins and also get you fingers on the cords strings and don't push down until all your fingers are in position  and then push down, strum, pick, strum change cords and do the same thing. I also believe working on the more difficult changes makes the rest easier eventually.
Keep at it and it will come around.


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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: FatFingers on March 22, 2017, 12:08:12 pm
I've been doing the one minute changes (A, D, E) and sometimes surprise myself with how different my results are... however, I start off good then quickly go rubbish. For D I am still putting my three fingers down one at a time. It's a bit frustrating.

If I do the strum-pick which of course is slower, the notes come out clean. But ten seconds in to the OMC, there's a lot of buzz, especially on the high E string for D. Even when playing along to Three Little Birds I start off good then the chords are rubbish and buzz :(

I also find that as I get further in to the OMC I start resting the neck on my fretting hand more. I tense up in my hand too much to try and get it 'right'. I have short fat sausage fingers and even though I am using the tips of my fingers and curling my fingers like Justin says, I am still causing buzz when changing chords. Which then causes frustration and thoughts of "who are you kidding, you're 42 years old, it's not like you're ever going to be in a band, why bother" etc etc!

Onwards and upwards though!

Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bigbl5 on March 22, 2017, 12:25:41 pm
Don't "fret" about putting one finger down at a time.  In fact, Justin doesn't even expect people to start trying to get the fingers down simultaneously until stage 5.  Moreover, I'm sure everyone starts out good with one minute changes and then around 35 seconds or so, things start to go south.  Even Justin mentions that in one of his videos.  I do it all the time myself.  Keep working at it and you'll get there.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: GolferBolts on March 22, 2017, 06:46:52 pm
I'm 5 weeks into my guitar 'journey' and I'm loving it. Still only on stage 2. I did all the 'fat finger' searches, quickly realising it's all down to practice. I am a lot better than i was when i started. I move one finger into place, the others then follow. So I'm getting there. Don't despair. I'm also closer to 50 than 40. Wish I'd have started sooner though.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: tobyjenner on March 22, 2017, 07:55:54 pm
Golfer

Welcome to the forum, sounds like you're doing ok. And don't worry we all have to start somewhere.  8)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: awooly on March 30, 2017, 04:21:15 am

FatFingers, this sounds like exactly where I am at also.  I've only been playing for 2 months, still on Stage 1 but considering moving to Stage 2 shortly.  I'm 45 yo and don't have short fat sausage fingers so it happens to all types but I'm loving it and can't wait to practice every night.  :)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Lord_Gigabyte on March 30, 2017, 11:32:22 am

42 years old here too. I'm playing since december 2015 somewhere. Some advice, don't tense up. That will only make things worse, as you noted yourself. Causing buzz will happen, it's inevitable. I'm in stage 4 of the beginners course and i'm getting buzz too from time to time. Move on, keep up the practice. It gets better in time. Also, i've noticed that a healthy mental attitude is key to a good practice. If something goes wrong, something's not working right, your hands aren't cooperating, no sweat. It will be better tomorrow.  The big key thing here is: practice and having fun playing.
You ask yourself: why bother? I've told myself upon asking that question: because i love it. And that's all the motivation you'd need imho. Not going to play in a band? Fine. Still, i love what i'm doing. I don't care about much else.
As long as you love playing, the rest will come. Keep at it, keep a healthy mental attitude and don't dwell too long on the mistakes you make. (There will be many more.... XD).

Keep up the good work!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: GolferBolts on April 18, 2017, 01:13:34 pm
Hi, it's​ a while since my last post and I've been doing a bit of practice. One thing that is annoying me is that when i change from my D chord to another (doesn't seem to matter which), the B string 'drones' as i lift my finger from it and goes open. When i watch Justin do his D to A and back, all you hear is chord after chord (no drone). Does this make sense? Even more practice needed, i suspect..
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: DarrellW on April 18, 2017, 01:22:35 pm
It's possible that you are releasing the pressure on the finger too abruptly, the release should be a reduction in pressure so you almost get a muted string followed by moving the finger, it happens very quickly so it's easy not to spot it. Try it slowly first and then when you get the idea speed it up.
Later on you will need to be able to do this for what is termed 'pull (or flick) offs', these are when you want the lower note to sound without picking it.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: dman2 on May 10, 2017, 01:14:06 pm
Sit opposite a mirror to watch your fingers till you get it

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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Joe B on June 15, 2017, 10:23:14 pm
Made this quickly to let me see visually which changes are lagging behind  and to track my progress. So far so good.
(http://www.bicycle365.com/postimages/1min1.png)

This timer on YouTube is perfect for me on these. It gives a 20 second cool down in between 1 minute intervals. Originally designed for high intensity interval training it is the perfect format for cranking these exercises out. I do 3 sets of 3 chords each time so with this I can do the entire routine in about 12 minutes.

https://youtu.be/En_sDvL-B5U
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: MPetten on June 22, 2017, 12:05:07 pm
I just started on the site about a week ago and I love it. I've tried several times to progress learning guitar but always stall. I'm already seeing progress. The lesson on one minute changes says aim for 40 changes a minute but the practice better section says greater than 25 a minute  with a target of 30. Which is correct? Thanks
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bigbl5 on June 22, 2017, 01:01:57 pm
You should really shoot to get them all up above 60 changes/minute.  However, the 40/minute is a gauge that Justin suggests before moving on to the next level.  Don't hyper-focus on little details.  Move on when you are ready to move on.  If you stall and are not making progress, move on.  Practice the things you find hard - not the things you find easy. 
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: DarrellW on June 22, 2017, 01:49:03 pm
Practice the things you find hard - not the things you find easy.
Absolutely 100%, give priority over the things you find easy; it's all too easy to fall into that trap!!! The other thing is to slow down until you get that or those particular change(s) right - don't practice doing them rushed and wrong - practicing things wrong is the worst thing you can do!!!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: MPetten on June 22, 2017, 03:10:36 pm
Thanks! I'm trying not to get hyper focused but it's hard. I've been at this a week and can nail high 20s to low 30s (counting each change) for changes between AD/AE/DE. I've been doing just chord progressions as practice but I'll start learning a song in the next couple days.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Joe B on July 06, 2017, 04:35:47 pm
Progress can be frustrating at times but even a casual approach will yield results. I've had some real life interference with my practice schedule (family medical) but progress is being made. I am sold on Justin's methodology and believe that I will continue to get better if I just follow the steps and ignore my unrealistic expectations. Keep plugging away at it folks!
(http://www.bicycle365.com/postimages/onemin.png)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Paulvm on July 06, 2017, 05:03:33 pm
Nice graph. I find that I perform better when I am not overly focused. Starting with the strum pick strum followed by some light strumming does the trick for me.  Here is my practice schedule. I also have some chords I put one finger down at a time, so I added air changes to my strum pick strum routine. I started noticing change after a few days. I also do some air changes when I am watching tv. That way I am not watching at my fingers and must rely on how it feels. It works for me(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170706/7958b9aa24acae179a70bf39c5037269.jpg)


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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Melissa on August 27, 2017, 01:40:27 am
So I've been practicing for a few hours a day the past five days or so. I have gel overlays on my nails so it is taking me a little bit of an adjustment playing with nails, but I'm getting it. It does make it easier on my finger tips being I'm fretting with my nails rather than my finger tips. Works for me.
So here's my question. I don't see that it's been directly answered. I've been getting better with my one minute changes and am up to 30 per minute on all three D, A, E. I'm having a hard time with the fingering for A with 1 on G, 2 on D and 3 on B but i'm good with the change over from d to a to e combinations using 1 on D, 2 on G abd 3 on B. The traditional way to do an A. Should I force myself to do it with the anchor finger with 1 on G? Will not doing it that way be a problem for future change overs or anything?
Thanks.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: DavidP on August 27, 2017, 06:38:16 am
Melissa, I'd recommend perseverance. I use both variations,  depending on the song I am playing. I think as you improve control and dexterity of the fingers you will eventually get it. And that will give you useful flexibility. I have no idea if using only the one will one day be a problem. Perhaps also start on the minors in stage 2 if you haven't already;  I have found that working on one thing often helps another.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: doolittle_ on October 07, 2017, 05:03:35 pm
Quick Question: I'm hitting the target of 60 changes a minute easily, but I'm still putting one finger down at a time. Is this fine? Or should I be placing all fingers down at the same time? Thanks.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: DarrellW on October 07, 2017, 05:39:14 pm
Quick Question: I'm hitting the target of 60 changes a minute easily, but I'm still putting one finger down at a time. Is this fine? Or should I be placing all fingers down at the same time? Thanks.
If you can accurately hit 60 changes with all notes clean then you're ok, if you're fluffing any notes you shouldn't count them, slow down if you're getting muted notes until you don't, practicing errors will slow you down long term.
If all chords are coming out clean then don't worry too much, you will get it with practice.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: SiegeFrog on October 08, 2017, 04:35:32 pm
You're at Stage 1, you're expected to be walking your fingers still at this stage. Justin doesn't introduce air changes until halfway through the course.


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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: alball on October 17, 2017, 03:29:22 pm
Just a word of encouragement to all those who might be frustrated at first...if you keep at it just a little bit you will be amazed how quickly you can become fast with these changes. It really is amazing how you can teach your brain, nerves and muscles a little sub-routine that becomes automatic, freeing you up to think about the next challenge.

Looking back at my sheet, I can see quick improvement, progressing from sub 30 to over 60 in 5 or 6 reps!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Toby101 on December 06, 2017, 10:13:33 pm
hey,
Im trying to stop looking at my strumming hand when doing the changes and am getting the changes a lot quicker.  However they dont sound so great now.  Is this OK do you think or should i go back to slower cleaner chord changes?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: sdd56 on December 08, 2017, 06:18:50 pm
You need to be sure that you can form the chords properly and consistently, by using the strum/pick/strum, at slow speed if necessary.

Then also use the 1 minute changes as a separate exercise to build up speed. They may not sound great but your fingers should be in the right place and you should be strumming the correct strings.

In time they will sound better even at speed. Don't be tempted to rush ahead and practice mistakes.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Wolfslair on December 14, 2017, 07:48:35 am
Can someone please explain chord changes in relation to beats per minute (BPM)?  I finally can change A , D and E chords about 60 times a minute. When I pull up a song in Riffstation or Tabs app, the BPM is always over 120. Does this mean I need to do 120 chord changes a minute to play the song at proper tempo?  When I play songs at my current 60 chord changes a minute, the song sounds horrible. Please excuse my confusion, I have been trying so hard and really want to learn.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Lord_Gigabyte on December 14, 2017, 10:11:10 am
If a song has 120 BPM as rythm, means that you'll have to strum at that tempo.

Chord changes will have to occur along the beat of the song and your strumming. This sounds harder than it is.

For instance, you have 4 bars of E, followed by A. You strum 4 bars at 120bpm and change to A. Yes, this means that you'll have to change chords within the tempo of 120bpm, but it comes with practice.

The one-minute change exercise is different.
When i get to, let's say, 80 changes per minute, i'm happy. Playing along with a song, is different from the one-minute changes.
Again, it comes with practice. (And having fun ofcourse).

Keep doing the one-minute exercise and air changes. They really do help.

I hope this makes any sense. If not, let me know, ok?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: joueur de guitare on December 14, 2017, 01:08:18 pm
In addition to what LG said.

At the minute you're doing 60 bpm with (I assume) all downstrums. There's not much that's going to sound great played like that. Don't worry about it. As you progress in the Beginner's Course you'll discover rhythm guitar basics and RUST. See links.

https://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-136-RhythmBasics1.php (https://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-136-RhythmBasics1.php)
https://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-146-RhythmBasics2.php (https://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-146-RhythmBasics2.php)

But where you are now, just concentrate on getting the changes smooth and sounding good. The BC is totally linear, everything is where it is for a reason, and more advanced stuff is introduced gradually. Be patient, you'll get there.

Justin is probably one of the best online guitar tutors ever, trust him ;)

<edit> it would also help if you read and understood a bit about musical notation and how it relates to TAB so you understand time signatures, tempi, note lengths and strumming patterns. Justin has a book that's very useful https://www.thejustinguitarstore.com/collections/books/products/the-justinguitar-note-reading-for-guitarists-book (https://www.thejustinguitarstore.com/collections/books/products/the-justinguitar-note-reading-for-guitarists-book) , but there are sites like this http://www.guitarnoise.com/lessons/standard-notation/ (http://www.guitarnoise.com/lessons/standard-notation/) where you can pick up the basics. But again, don't worry about that too much.

Good luck, have fun :)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Seraph69 on January 01, 2018, 09:58:46 pm
Hi all,

So I picked up a guitar on Thursday (so 4 days ago now), and have been following Justin's amazing beginner's course (thank you Justin!).

I've uploaded a video of myself attempting the 1-minute changes exercise with chords A &
D, and would appreciate it if you guys might be able to give me some feedback on it?

Basically I want to know if you think the quality of the chords is good enough for this exercise?
Obviously it's more about speed than anything else, but I've tried to get them sounding as good as I can at that speed (I'm on the edge of my ability and trying not to tense up too much as I play them!)

After watching it back myself, I can already hear I'm muting the 1st (thinnest) string quite often on the D chord - I think my ring finger is laying across it slightly. I actually find it the easiest of the 3 chords I've learned, but clearly at this speed I struggle to keep it quite as clean.

Anything else you guys can point out would be much appreciated  ;)


Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: sdd56 on January 01, 2018, 10:58:14 pm
Your link isn't working for me.

I think you need to make 5 posts before you can post a link.

See this thread and add a couple of post there:

https://justinguitarcommunity.com/index.php?topic=29431.0
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: DarrellW on January 02, 2018, 04:06:31 am
The problem with the video is probably one of security, if it’s not been made available to people with links to it it won’t work.
As regards the one minute changes I would recommend that to start with you play at least one appegiated chord during your attempt of each chord, the changes MUST be correct and ring out without muting, if you can’t then slow down until you can. Practicing bad quality changes is bad and will definitely slow down your progress, patience to do it right is THE MOST important thing to get into your head, remember more haste less speed is definitely applicable in this situation.
Good luck and keep at it, it will come good if you practice honestly!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Seraph69 on January 02, 2018, 06:33:53 am
I was able to post the link itself but I think my error was setting the video to private. I'd figured that would allow people to see it if they had the link, but not discover it. Obviously not how it works

Do I need to set it to public then?

And also, in my gut, I know you're probably right Darrell. I'm a bit of a perfectionist anyway so this doesn't bother me, tbh I didn't even 'hear' my own string muting until I recorded this and played it back, so if nothing else, it may have already told me what I needed to know before it's too late!

Still love to hear what you think though.

I will set to public if someone confirms this is what I need to do?

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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: pera_sfh on January 05, 2018, 05:43:40 pm
Hello everyone! I've reached this lesson but I don't seem to be making that much progress. I've been practicing changing between chords for a few days now, and I've more-or-less stayed at the start - I can make maybe 20 changes per minute, counting each switch between two chords as one change. This has made me a bit disheartened but I've still got the will - anyhow, does anyone have an idea as to how long it would take to get to one change per second (60 per minute) after learning the chords (A, D, E) well?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: jono on January 05, 2018, 05:53:57 pm
Hello everyone! I've reached this lesson but I don't seem to be making that much progress. I've been practicing changing between chords for a few days now, and I've more-or-less stayed at the start - I can make maybe 20 changes per minute, counting each switch between two chords as one change. This has made me a bit disheartened but I've still got the will - anyhow, does anyone have an idea as to how long it would take to get to one change per second (60 per minute) after learning the chords (A, D, E) well?
A few days is too short for much progress. Around 1-2 months is usual to reach 60bpm when starting

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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: sdd56 on January 05, 2018, 06:03:18 pm
I agree with Jono - just checked my spreadsheet and it took me 6 weeks to get to 60 on A-D-E.
Although some will have got there much quicker I'm sure.
It will take time for your fingers (and brain) to get used to completely new movements.
Keep motivated and you will find as you progress, it won't take so long to learn new chords (except for the dreaded F!)
Stick with Justin's course and you will get there.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: tobyjenner on January 05, 2018, 07:05:03 pm
Hello everyone! I've reached this lesson but I don't seem to be making that much progress. I've been practicing changing between chords for a few days now, and I've more-or-less stayed at the start - I can make maybe 20 changes per minute, counting each switch between two chords as one change. This has made me a bit disheartened but I've still got the will - anyhow, does anyone have an idea as to how long it would take to get to one change per second (60 per minute) after learning the chords (A, D, E) well?

Pera

Don't forget the objective for the early stages is only 40 before you're ready to move - not counting the other stuff in the stage lessons. Sounds like its very early days for you but keep working away and the speed will come. We've all been there and it just a matter of practice and more practice.

Cheers

Toby
 8)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: pera_sfh on January 07, 2018, 09:08:27 am
A few days is too short for much progress. Around 1-2 months is usual to reach 60bpm when starting
Pera

Don't forget the objective for the early stages is only 40 before you're ready to move - not counting the other stuff in the stage lessons. Sounds like its very early days for you but keep working away and the speed will come. We've all been there and it just a matter of practice and more practice.

Cheers

Toby
 8)
I agree with Jono - just checked my spreadsheet and it took me 6 weeks to get to 60 on A-D-E.
Although some will have got there much quicker I'm sure.
It will take time for your fingers (and brain) to get used to completely new movements.
Keep motivated and you will find as you progress, it won't take so long to learn new chords (except for the dreaded F!)
Stick with Justin's course and you will get there.

Thanks guys!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: GregS on January 07, 2018, 07:59:27 pm
Hello everyone! I've reached this lesson but I don't seem to be making that much progress.
I started in late November.  I track my changes on a Google spreadsheet as well.

For me, the A - D chord changes went pretty smoothly.  I see that I hit 60 per minute on A - D and 40 for the D-E and A-E changes in 20 days.  But now at about 40 days, I am still not at 60 changes for D-E and A-E.  Everyone progresses at their own speed.

Since I was at 40 changes, I added in Am, Em and Dm.  My changes to Am are coming along, but not nearly as quickly as the other chords.  And any changes to Dm are in the mid 20's per minute.  Just keep practicing as often as you can and the speed will come.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: m_c on January 07, 2018, 08:11:46 pm
One thing I always find that helps if struggling with anything, is whenever you can, just grab the guitar and try whatever you're struggling with. Even if it's just 30 seconds doing a single run through, or a couple chord changes, as you walk past the guitar, it's all about building muscle memory.

Little and often, is usually far better at ingraining things, than lots and not so often.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: DarrellW on January 07, 2018, 09:01:56 pm
↑↑↑↑↑↑↑↑
Absolutely, another tip is to make sure your guitar is visible most of the time; if it's hidden away you will be playing it considerably less. As said picking it up and having a go for 5mins at a time maybe 5-10 times a day is much better than one long go. I pick mine up during the adverts when Mrs W is watching tv; one of my guitars is by me most of the time (and one of my Ukuleles).
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: pera_sfh on January 08, 2018, 07:17:52 pm
I started in late November.  I track my changes on a Google spreadsheet as well.

For me, the A - D chord changes went pretty smoothly.  I see that I hit 60 per minute on A - D and 40 for the D-E and A-E changes in 20 days.  But now at about 40 days, I am still not at 60 changes for D-E and A-E.  Everyone progresses at their own speed.

Since I was at 40 changes, I added in Am, Em and Dm.  My changes to Am are coming along, but not nearly as quickly as the other chords.  And any changes to Dm are in the mid 20's per minute.  Just keep practicing as often as you can and the speed will come.
One thing I always find that helps if struggling with anything, is whenever you can, just grab the guitar and try whatever you're struggling with. Even if it's just 30 seconds doing a single run through, or a couple chord changes, as you walk past the guitar, it's all about building muscle memory.

Little and often, is usually far better at ingraining things, than lots and not so often.
↑↑↑↑↑↑↑↑
Absolutely, another tip is to make sure your guitar is visible most of the time; if it's hidden away you will be playing it considerably less. As said picking it up and having a go for 5mins at a time maybe 5-10 times a day is much better than one long go. I pick mine up during the adverts when Mrs W is watching tv; one of my guitars is by me most of the time (and one of my Ukuleles).
Thanks fellas!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: DevonS on January 08, 2018, 07:49:07 pm
pera,
Everyone is right.  Just stick with it and when you get frustrated, put it down for a while.  I get really cranky when it's just "not working" and have to force myself to just leave it for a while.

Another thing is it could possibly be equipment related.  I only say this because I have a really old, crappy, cheap acoustic that I've had for 30 years and never progressed on.  Started on it again in November.  All kinds of buzzing and whining and plinking around.  Found this site and others singing the praises of electric and warning of cheap acoustics.  I rented a Fender electric just before Christmas and the progress has been much more satisfying.  Not a cure-all... I still buzz and plink plenty, but I find it's just easier to play.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: GregS on January 08, 2018, 08:00:32 pm
Absolutely, another tip is to make sure your guitar is visible most of the time; if it's hidden away you will be playing it considerably less.
This is the reason that I didn't buy a case right away.  I have a stand that makes sure that every time I'm in the family room my guitar is in sight.  I've found from other hobbies that out of sight, out of mind.  Makes it hard to remember to practice if it is not in view.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: lydiamay on January 29, 2018, 12:35:02 pm
I can't find my post sorry from the other day.

I'm struggling to determine between speed and accuracy.

At this point should I be able to nail the chords with finger pressure and not be resting on other strings etc at this speed?

Should I also be able to memorize which strings to play for the chord without looking at them? Glancing from chord to strum is slowing me down and even without looking and not getting it right I'm still messing up the chords and even then still not fast enough haha. Just want to know whether to focus on speed rather than perfection?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: neophytosdm on February 05, 2018, 02:28:43 pm
Hello people!

I just want to say what I found helpful from my personal experience and hopefully this can help a few others who might be struggling with their 1 min changes!

I got frustrated with my 1 min changes and I was also wondering things like "how many changes a minute is good, should the changes be perfect, should I get 30 a minute consecutively without a mistake, should the changes be even" etc.

So what helped me is that I'm doing a variation of 1 min changes. Instead of using the 1 minute exercise I'm just using the metronome and I gradually increase the speed with the goal of reaching a certain number of PERFECT changes.

For example I'm doing F to G at 50 bpm and my goal is 30 perfect changes (doesn't matter how much time I need and it doesn't matter if the perfect changes are consecutive - at first)
When I can do that I increase the speed to 55bpm and so on.

I found out that this exercise (at least for me) helps my accuracy, which helps my confidence which eventually helps me speed up my changes faster than just doing the changes under the 1 minute limit which adds pressure.

Also as Justin says, leave the easiest changes, choose the five that you find the hardest and you're automatically becoming better at the other ones too.

And have a nice day!
 

 
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Gray99y on February 07, 2018, 10:52:39 pm
It's impossible for me to do chord changes quickly. Depending on the chord it can take me 7 or 8 seconds to do one change.
Any tips? 

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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Gray99y on February 07, 2018, 11:09:09 pm
Ok I've been trying to learn the guitar for about 8 years. I'm still stuck on one minute chord changes. About 15 changes is my limit, I've never tried to play a song cos of my chord changes, think I know six different chords.
So when is the time to pack it in? Like I say I've been learning for a long time.

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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: GregS on February 07, 2018, 11:32:11 pm
It could be your practice routine.  How have you been practicing?  How often and for how long?

You might want to just mix it up and try a different routine.

Only you can tell if you should keep playing or not.  If you still like playing, then keep playing.  If you don't like it anymore, then move onto something else that you will like doing.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: close2u on February 08, 2018, 09:50:24 am
@ Gray99

Which chords are you learning just now? How long have you been learning for?

You have to force yourself to change faster somehow but things will slot in to place with regular bursts of practice.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Del on February 11, 2018, 11:45:07 am
@ Gray99y

Hi there's one thing i tried today that has really changed how i think about and intend to approach current and future 1 min changes. Also has given me more motivation and confidence.

I am now on stage 2 and, like most, struggling with the Dm changes, and hit a wall. Having been stuck for a week around the 19-24 changes mark involving Dm, i decided i needed a different approach.
I am convinced i have been trying too hard to cram in as many as possibly forcing myself way too fast. I found my fingers were just not behaving, they were panicking and screwing up lol. I wanted to prove to myself this was holding me back.
So I turned off the timer and picked up the metronome. I set it at 20 and tried to change Am to Dm in time with it. Something was definitely wrong here because it seemed too easy! Ok one or two of them were a bit buzzy but the whole thing felt more relaxed. I think its because i wasn't pushing to do more than i was capable of.
Next out of interest i set it to 30. I hadn't achieved 30 with Dm yet. i messed a few up yes, but the number of acceptable chord changes was definitely higher than my usual 1 minute "timer" mess and it didn't feel too forced. I really don't think it will be long before i can get that 30 comfortably and move it up to 35 and so on.

I since had a look and there is a thread in the hints and tips about using a metronome but maybe not in so much detail so wanted to share my experience. I hope this works for you and anyone else struggling.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Gray99y on February 11, 2018, 11:54:30 am
Just basic chords, A D E C F G
I try and practice for a shorter length of time 30 mins max, and more frequent.  It seems the longer I keep on practising a chord the worse I get.

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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Del on February 11, 2018, 12:01:42 pm
guess you may have picked up some fundamental bad habits perhaps holding you back? Have you considered trying the Beginners course form the beginning following the lessons?
you never know it might reveal a quick fix or highlight something making things difficult for yourself?

If you have invested this much time so far it wouldn't be a lot of time to identify a problem.

Maybe another consideration, why not a lesson or two from a local tutor who might just clear the way once you get started?

you might kick yourself either way if you find something really simple stopping you progress
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: neophytosdm on February 18, 2018, 05:36:53 pm
Ok I've been trying to learn the guitar for about 8 years. I'm still stuck on one minute chord changes. About 15 changes is my limit, I've never tried to play a song cos of my chord changes, think I know six different chords.
So when is the time to pack it in? Like I say I've been learning for a long time.

Sent from my [device_name] using JustinGuitar Community mobile app (http://JustinGuitar Community mobile app)

Hey man, I was having difficulties with 1 min changes too, that's why I used the method I described in page 31. It might help you. Just set the metronome at a speed you are comfortable making a chord change. Doesn't matter if it's the slowest speed. When hearing the beats you know how much time you have to make the change until the next beat. 
Also you might want to try "air changes" if you don't do it already and make sure that your fretting hand doesn't go far from the strings when you're making a chord change because that's slowing you down. 

And do not give up just yet, try what I told you because that thing you have problem with it might only mean that you did not find the right way of practice for you. Not everyone learns with the same way. And progress doesn't always come 1 step at a time. Sometimes you are just stuck for a long time and then suddenly you might realize a simple thing you were doing wrong and you go 3 steps up.

I also agree with what "Del" said. If it is possible to find a guitar teacher even for a few lessons it might help you to solve that one particular problem quicker. And finally I agree with "close2u". To have a bigger possibility achieving what I described above you have to practice your changes 5-10 minutes each day. Maybe 5 minutes in the morning and 5 minutes after a few hours. Let your muscle memory do the rest. And get a good recovery. 10 minutes each day is good, 3-4 hours in one day is bad. I will stop talking now. :Ρ
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: DarrellW on February 18, 2018, 07:19:20 pm
Just basic chords, A D E C F G
I try and practice for a shorter length of time 30 mins max, and more frequent.  It seems the longer I keep on practising a chord the worse I get.
OK, there’s the clue!
The longer you practice the worse you get - therefore you’re practicing errors and ingraining errors; have a go at just changing chords, ignore how many you’re doing just slow down until you get them right once you do and the changes become accurate then gradually try to go faster. If you can put your guitar somewhere you can see it and pick it up for a few minutes at a time, no pressure just a casual play!
Another useful exercise is to take each chord one at a time and go through this little routine - it’s something I use to learn new chords!
Fret the chord shape, play the single notes, do a single strum then lay your fingers flat lightly on the fretboard and do a muted strum, make the chord shape again...... repeat until you can make the chord easily and quickly, gradually build up speed.
I would also suggest having a go at a simple song like Three little birds and see how you get on - obviously concentrate on the required chords in your practice sessions.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Banksy on February 23, 2018, 06:46:50 pm
Hi. I also have the same problem as MikeG, though i believe it is very natural for beginners. If i try and not look at my where my fingers are placed, to try and get out of the habit, it is very difficult, i know in my mind where i think my fingers are for the chords, but dont always get it spot on. How or when is a good time for a beginner to not be looking at your fingers? As if i do look at my fingers, im getting an average of 16 chord changes a minute. The moment i dont look im only getting 8 changes if im lucky. While its fun doing the 1 minute chord changes, this is very frustrating, to get past. Any advice please?

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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: robsin on February 23, 2018, 07:06:01 pm
For me it just came naturally with time. But it's not 100%, for example, I can pretty much hit C, E, Am and D without looking. I discovered that one day when I was practicing and I looked up at the sheet music and changed between a couple of those chords without looking. I was surprised. However, I still have to look for G (especially Big G, I don't know why adding D note throws me :/ ) and many others.

This didn't start happening for me until after months of practice.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Banksy on February 28, 2018, 02:17:36 am
For me it just came naturally with time. But it's not 100%, for example, I can pretty much hit C, E, Am and D without looking. I discovered that one day when I was practicing and I looked up at the sheet music and changed between a couple of those chords without looking. I was surprised. However, I still have to look for G (especially Big G, I don't know why adding D note throws me :/ ) and many others.

This didn't start happening for me until after months of practice.
Thanks for the comment. I will just stick with it, as I am really enjoying my learning, despite the hiccups. Small steps.


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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: kuba9005 on March 10, 2018, 02:44:04 pm
Hello everyone.

I've been practising with Justin's method (using the app too) since February 19. I'm 27 years old and I finally decided to start playing guitar as a hobby.

I'm currently thinking of going to stage two of the beginner's course. I've reached 60 changes per minute (not all of them are perfect, but I not terrible) and after every session I've been jamming with first three chords, just playing around figuring out random beats and chord progressions.

Here's what's happening though. When I'm just playing around with those three chords and basically enjoying myself it sounds ok, I can pull off changes without a problem on vast majority of occasions, the strings ring out ok most of the time too. I've been paying more attention to thumb placement and posture lately and I can see improvement in that too. However, when I practise One Minute Changes or Beat Exercises, I've noticed that I tend to make more mistakes as far as cleanliness of the sound is concerned and my fretting hand starts getting sore faster than when just jamming around.
Have you guys experienced it as well?

I would be obliged if you can give me some advice or share your experience.

Cheers!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on March 10, 2018, 05:08:27 pm
When playing music you usually don't change chords on every beat so your hand gets a break between changes.
As you advance you hands will get stronger.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: zedhead on March 10, 2018, 07:58:26 pm
What really helps me is air changes, I'm not sure you have got that far in your journey. I found once I could change at a reasonable speed a lot of my chords were messy as all I was concentrating on was speed.
 A few weeks using air changes have helped me enormously but I'm afraid its perseverance. The F chord nearly beat me on many occasions but I got there in the end.....nearly!
 Many people on here say have the guitar handy so you can grab it when you feel like it, do a few chords and put it down. I now do this all the time.
I also followed Darryl's idea of forming the chord, laying down the fingers and forming it again which also helped. Its strange because eventually your fingers will just form the chord shape as they come down on to the strings.
Keep at it and it will start to fall in place, that's what I tell myself anyway!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Del on March 12, 2018, 07:37:05 am

Here's what's happening though. When I'm just playing around with those three chords and basically enjoying myself it sounds ok, I can pull off changes without a problem on vast majority of occasions, the strings ring out ok most of the time too. I've been paying more attention to thumb placement and posture lately and I can see improvement in that too. However, when I practise One Minute Changes or Beat Exercises, I've noticed that I tend to make more mistakes as far as cleanliness of the sound is concerned and my fretting hand starts getting sore faster than when just jamming around.
Have you guys experienced it as well?

Yes i did until i stopped trying to reach 60 per minute in the first few attempts and allowed it to happen gradually!
I suspect you are pressing yourself too hard to fit as many changes as possible. Trying to go faster probably makes you more tense and pressing on the frets harder resulting in the soreness. When you are jamming i bet you are more relaxed?!
You might try coming at the 1 minute changes differently. Instead of trying to fit as many as possible in, forcing yourself to go beyond what is comfortable right now, go at a comfortable speed and see how many changes actually happen in a minute naturally as opposed to how many you can force.
Find the rhythm/speed of changes that fits your current level then try again,  slightly increasing the speed of that rhythm aiming increase the number of quality changes only by 3 or 4. Across a minute the extra 3 or 4 may not asking too much. Using the metronome helps a lot setting it first to determine what is comfortable then increasing just a little.
Hope it helps
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: TheWhiteknight on March 12, 2018, 10:02:28 am

Hey everyone,I got 8 cycles(D to E,E to D) on  my first time.Actually I am not sure if I am going too fast,I have been playing  for 3 days and I have reached lesson BC-115.Please  do tell me if I should go slow.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: bigbl5 on March 12, 2018, 01:52:00 pm
No, you are fine.  I go by stage.  So for stage 1, I would watch all of the lessons, and then practice according to the the last video of the stage. 
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: kuba9005 on March 15, 2018, 07:25:42 pm
Yes i did until i stopped trying to reach 60 per minute in the first few attempts and allowed it to happen gradually!
I suspect you are pressing yourself too hard to fit as many changes as possible. Trying to go faster probably makes you more tense and pressing on the frets harder resulting in the soreness. When you are jamming i bet you are more relaxed?!
You might try coming at the 1 minute changes differently. Instead of trying to fit as many as possible in, forcing yourself to go beyond what is comfortable right now, go at a comfortable speed and see how many changes actually happen in a minute naturally as opposed to how many you can force.
Find the rhythm/speed of changes that fits your current level then try again,  slightly increasing the speed of that rhythm aiming increase the number of quality changes only by 3 or 4. Across a minute the extra 3 or 4 may not asking too much. Using the metronome helps a lot setting it first to determine what is comfortable then increasing just a little.
Hope it helps

Thank you!
Perhaps I have been pressing myself too hard really. And yes, when I'm jamming around I am far more relaxed for some reason. Even when I play faster and mess around with different strumming patterns, it sounds fairly fine. I've been trying to learn three little birds (with a metronome at 70bpm) and I mess up a lot, even though it's such a slow and simple song.
I can'r wrap my head around this to be honest. It's been almost a month and I feel like my progress is not good enough.

Also, I think I'll start recording myself playing the song just to have a week to week comparison of how I'm doing...
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Gray99y on March 17, 2018, 02:57:33 pm
I've come to the conclusion that the metronome is sent from hell.
I can do some one minute changes at my own pace, but once the metronome is introduced my fingers act like they are possessed.  Thrashing at the strings in sheer panic but not at the learnt chords, just randomly anywhere.
Anxiety takes over and I end up a mess.
Anyone else get this?


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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Gray99y on March 17, 2018, 03:06:38 pm
I'm learning one minute changes chords A D E
Can I not learn anything else until these are mastered?
I average about 25 chord changes a minute, they're not always clear and I have to look at my fingers otherwise they would miss the guitar completely. 
Shall I learn other chords or wait?

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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: close2u on March 17, 2018, 03:10:42 pm
Hello and welcome.
Are you trying to do one minute changes with a metronome?
If so then that is not the plan.
Do them without.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: joueur de guitare on March 17, 2018, 03:18:49 pm
I'm learning one minute changes chords A D E
Can I not learn anything else until these are mastered?
I average about 25 chord changes a minute, they're not always clear and I have to look at my fingers otherwise they would miss the guitar completely. 
Shall I learn other chords or wait?

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If you can't make clear changes on A D and E what is the benefit of racing ahead and learning other chords that you can't play properly?

Stage 1, and all other stages in the BC, is holistic. You don't JUST practice one minute changes. Do all the lessons from BC-111 to BC-118. Read the practice schedule BC-119.

Play songs https://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-117-EasySongs.php (https://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-117-EasySongs.php)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Gray99y on March 17, 2018, 06:25:27 pm
So do all the other lessons, but just carry on with the lesson I can't do?
My chords can sometimes be OK, just not at speed. I could maybe manage 30 changes a minute on a good day.

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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: tobyjenner on March 17, 2018, 06:26:01 pm
If you can't make clear changes on A D and E what is the benefit of racing ahead and learning other chords that you can't play properly?

Stage 1, and all other stages in the BC, is holistic. You don't JUST practice one minute changes. Do all the lessons from BC-111 to BC-118. Read the practice schedule BC-119.

Play songs https://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-117-EasySongs.php (https://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-117-EasySongs.php)

Also read the accompanying text with each lesson an omission many folk make and miss vital guidance and information.

Your query also needs some context, How long have you been learning stage 1 ? Are your pick/strum/pick exercises all clean for the stage 1 chords?

As indicated above the Beginners Course is structured in a way that develops skills in a progressive and logical fashion. Jumping ahead to learn new chords because you have not learnt the first three correctly is not a good idea and will quickly see you dumping your guitar in the bin. What happens if you stuggle with the stage 2 chords that you've jumped to after not competing stage one as required ? Jump straight into stage 3 chords and see if they work any better ? That's a recipe for disaster.

Sorry to sound harsh but I have had personally made so many similar misguided steps over the 17/18 years before arriving here, I'd like to help folk not to do the same. Meet the requirements of each stage as specified before moving on.

Cheers

Toby
 8)
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Gray99y on March 21, 2018, 03:26:15 pm
I'm still struggling with these chord changes.  I practise everyday but they get worse. About 14 changes a minute between the A,D,E chords. But I usually miss strings like only top four strings on A or play all six strings. I'm only practising three chords, and I've always got stuck with these lesson. Been practicing for seven years now, it's getting ridiculous. 
Do many people just give up??

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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on March 21, 2018, 03:43:59 pm
I think it's time to get a music teacher. Some face to face time with a teacher will do wonders.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Cas1086 on March 21, 2018, 07:16:19 pm
Is it ok to look at my fingers during the chord changes? Or should I be doing this without looking? I am much slower when I do it with my eyes closed. Should I master these first three chords and changes with my eyes closed before moving ahead in the lessons?
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on March 21, 2018, 07:48:21 pm
Personally I think the soon you quit looking the better. Others will disagree.
Learning to play music isn't about how fast you learn it's about how well you learn.

Not looking may take a little longer but you won't have to try and break the habit when
singing into a mic or to an audience. Both are hard to do when looking down at your fingers.
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: jono on March 22, 2018, 08:30:14 am
I think not looking will come with practice but yes the sooner the better.  If you are still on the first three chords I would probably recommend you look at what you are doing. The first steps of learning guitar are hard enough without adding extra challenges.

I believe that at the beginning for many it is important to get far enough along to begin to play songs before getting too fustrated with the difficulty of playing and give up.

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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Ahmad.mansour on March 22, 2018, 10:02:02 pm
I finished the beginner course  but my question is 1 mintur change was about for example:
G to C = 1
Or G to C + G to C = 1

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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on March 22, 2018, 10:25:42 pm
From Justin's web site
Quote
Count ‘1' for each change; so D–A–D–A = four changes
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Ahmad.mansour on March 23, 2018, 09:39:18 am
Ah wow cuz i finished the course in 3 months and i had 46 changes almost in each change he mentioned but im was counting g to c + g to c=1
So now i got almost 90 change per minute

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Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: Mo003 on July 10, 2018, 10:04:20 pm
Hey everyone!
I just started learning guitar yesterday! Right now I'm practicing the 3 chords A - E - D with the one minute changes.

But I have a slight problem: I have an acoustic with strings made of steel and the action is pretty high (I know it's preferable to set it up but I don't really have enough money right now to do it). When doing the A chord, I have to press REALLY hard on the first finger (The one far from the fret) otherwise It's buzzy, but it's extremely painful, so most of time I don't press hard enough and you can hear (a very slight) buzz.

What do you advice me to do? Should I just continue practicing anyway? Maybe I should do just the E -> D chords for now, until my fingers toughen?

Thank you!
Title: Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
Post by: stitch101 on July 11, 2018, 12:39:00 am
Welcom to the forum
Keep practicing and don't worry about the buzz and don't press to hard
You've just started playing, your fingers will still be soft and playing
is the only way to toughen them up.
Once the calluses have built up and your technique gets better you'll find
the buzz will go away.