Justin Guitar Community

Site Lesson Specific Questions => Justin's Beginners Guitar Course (BC) => Topic started by: justinguitar on June 03, 2009, 12:25:32 pm

Title: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: justinguitar on June 03, 2009, 12:25:32 pm
Lesson Link: http://justinguitar.com/en/BC-111-D-chord.php

Questions...
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: iherdcats on November 11, 2014, 07:05:54 pm
I feel like I'm strangling the neck of the guitar because I'm pushing so hard on the strings. I'm following all the rules (thumb around the neck, palm not touching, treating the bottom of the neck like an electric wire) but I'm squeezing my thumb against the neck really hard to get the leverage on the strings to press them down. I'm assuming its because my fingers aren't very strong yet. Is this normal, or is it a bad habit that I should keep from developing?
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: stitch101 on November 11, 2014, 07:32:12 pm
Squeezing the neck to hard is a very common thing for beginners. Thy this. Make a D chord and relax your
hand. Strum the guitar and add only enough pressure to make the strings ring out. That's all the pressure
you need. As your fingers and hand get stronger you will need even less or it will seem like less pressure.

Another thing is if your guitar has really bad action at the nut this will make it harder to play. Having
your guitar set up properly by a guitar tech can make a big difference.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: deadeye_ag on November 11, 2014, 07:37:31 pm
How long have you been playing? Struggling to press hard enough on the strings to get the notes to ring clearly is a common problem when first starting out. Still there are a couple of things you should check with your guitar.

Have a guitar tech look at your set up. Is the action too high? The action is how high the strings sit above the fretboard. If it's too high, you have to press harder to get things to ring out clearly. The tech can lower the action for you.

What kind of strings do you have? If they are heavy gauge strings then try switching to some extra light ones until your finger strength builds up. Also coated strings are gentler on the fingers,  A lot of folks like Elixirs Extra Lights with the nanoweb coating (for acoustics). There are other brands, just ask around.

You shouldn't have to "strangle the neck" but it probably feels like that at first. Without seeing pics or video it's hard to know if you are overly tensing up or doing anything technically wrong. If you have been playing for a few months and you don't seem to be getting stronger and your guitar is properly set up, then I would start looking at technique; otherwise, it's just part of starting out :)


Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Drubbing on November 11, 2014, 11:49:28 pm
You fingers are still soft. The harder you press, the more you'll just indent the string in your fingers and the notes will still not ring clear. You've just got to find a good medium til your fingertips harden up.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Tazz3 on November 12, 2014, 04:17:02 am
The d chord is a pain. I can do it,but switching to other chrods from the d is tough.
Switching chords feels weird to me but iam only playing 30 days lol
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: ClausP on December 17, 2014, 07:55:46 pm
I have the same struggle with the D chord. To me it is clearly the most difficult of the 2 chords in Stage 1. Both in terms of making it ring nicely and when doing chord changes.

I guess it is just a matter of practise - I hope..... :(
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: tobyjenner on December 17, 2014, 08:40:53 pm
Claus

See the comments above but yes its down to practice - proper practice ie being accurate. As a beginner one of the biggest problems will be soft finger tips. Bet they hurt like hell after a practice session? Over time you'll build up not only stronger fingers but calluses that hard pad of skin which will make fretting chords easier. These take time to develop but once you have them, you start to stop strangling the guitar!!

Keep at it and you'll soon have that D ringing clear 8) 
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: deadeye_ag on December 17, 2014, 10:06:53 pm
Yes, it's practice. Most if not all of us have been there. You wonder how you will EVER get a chord to work. Small progress then one day you've got it. I went through this with A, D, C, B7, Bm, G7, and of course the effing F chord. Keep at it. Form the chord, pluck each string, making sure it rings clearly. Repeat. Practice your one minutes changes...
 
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: hilts17 on December 18, 2014, 03:52:32 pm
I completely agree with the 2 comments above mine. When I started the beginner course this past July I just could not get the D chord to ring clear. I thought, "Great, the first chord and I can't even play it!" But I read loads of encouraging comments here and persevered. Before long I nailed it and as you may have heard, you wonder what the big deal was. And for sure once you get some nice calluses on your fingertips (and you will) that makes playing easier too. So just keep practising, practising, practising and you will be amazed with what you can do. I'm 55 years old, I just started stage 4 of the BC, and I can play several songs. If I can do it, anybody can.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Zebzebra on December 28, 2014, 12:10:05 am
I have been placing my thumb directly behind my index finger on the back of the neck 3/4 of the way down, and this position forces me to severely bend my wrist, so that my hand is nearly at a right angle with my inner forearm. Although I have only been playing about for a week I am already starting to develop wrist pains from this hand posture, and it doesn't feel like a strong position from which to fret chords. How should I be placing my thumb and wrist to avoid this position? Thanks :)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: shadowscott007 on December 28, 2014, 03:14:51 pm
Take a close look at Justin's hand position on the page and in the video lesson.

http://justinguitar.com/en/BC-111-D-chord.php

Specifically his thumb is up towards the top of the neck which let's him keep his wrist straighter.  The curl is in the fingers not the wrist.  Sounds like your thumb is to far around the neck. Flatten your wrist and let the thumb be where it ends up when your wrist is flatter.  Will probably require adjustments to your finger arch.

Watch the video and focus on his hand wrist thumb position.  Might help to mute the video and focus on watching his left hand.

Dhadow
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Zebzebra on December 28, 2014, 07:50:59 pm
Thanks shadowscott,

I had lowered my thumb because Justin said that as a beginner I should not put my thumb at the top of the neck. Is it alright to ignore that advice in order to keep my wrist straight?
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: shadowscott007 on December 28, 2014, 08:34:55 pm
It is a matter of degree.  If you watch the video closely, when he is demonstrating the beginners position you can still see his thumb tip peeking over the top of the neck, that is fine.  His thumb never disappears completely behind the neck.

If you look when he mentions what NOT to do as a beginner his thumb is way over and reaching around the front of the neck almost touching the low strings.  The joint of the thumb is over the top of the neck.  That is what he wants you to avoid.

You most certainly do NOT want your wrist bent anywhere close to 90 degrees.  You want to move your thumb up some so it isn't forcing your hand in that position.   I would say to rest the pad of your thumb about even with the 5th string on the back of the neck or thereabouts.

Shadow
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: ClausP on December 28, 2014, 08:49:04 pm
Well, I finally got this one nailed. Found out that I needed to have my palm more parallel to the fretboard (without touching though). This made me able to get my ring finger (3. finger) more vertical down on the 2. string really using only the tip, which solved my problem.

I couldn't do this for the first few weeks, but I'm already getting some more flexibility into my wrist, so now it works for me.

So, this was my last problem with Stage 1. Stage 2 here I come....  :)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Luvntravln on January 05, 2015, 04:37:09 pm
Hi, I really don't know where to post this question so here I am in the garbage general area. As a result of a lung disease - no I am not a smoker - I have slowed down; hence - the guitar. I travel full time, literally, so I am learning on a Martin Backpacker - small body.

Problem: D Chord!

I can transition to the A and E without a problem; with the D my 3rd finger doesn't want to go past the 2nd finger until it has touched the string.

Suggestions for training your fingers!

Thanks,
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Rossco01 on January 05, 2015, 04:49:04 pm
Thumbs up for starting to learn. Even though I'm very much a beginner it's difficult after 12 months to remember exactly how difficult some things were. D was definitely the first "hard" chord to do. In general I have to say that the rule of thumb is just to practice, practice, practice. The reality is that it can take ages for things just to be muscle memory BUT when it does you never have to think about it again.

In terms of your particular problem I've just picked up the guitar and moved from A to D. Using Justins fingering I notice my second finger just naturally moves across quite nicely to the high E, my third finger stays reasonably high and away from the strings and then comes straight down onto the G string. It doesn't come across the second string at all but comes down. I would just take it very very slowly and get the finger movements right. You'll hit more bad ones than good ones to start with but if you do the 1 min changes really really slowly to start with i.e. sub 20 min, you should start to notice an improvement.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: rocky77 on January 05, 2015, 05:03:31 pm
Have you tried watching Justin's video on the A D E changes.

http://justinguitar.com/en/BC-114-AnchorFingers.php
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: afeuti5 on January 06, 2015, 07:56:40 pm
I am having a hard time with the D chord, it seems that my third finger keeps hitting the first string and giving it a horrible buzzing noise any suggestions??
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: tobyjenner on January 06, 2015, 08:16:27 pm
Make sure your fingers are curled, specially the 3rd, and if its still catching the high E occasionally, try rolling your hand towards the ceiling, so the 3rd finger is more arched and therefore further away from the top string 8)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: deadeye_ag on January 06, 2015, 08:20:17 pm
Buzzing comes from finger placement and a lack of pressure/finger strength usually.

1) Make sure your that third finger is as close to that third fret as possible.
2) Make sure your fingers are arched and not flat
3) Press down using the tips of your fingers and not the fleshy part.

Other things not related to your experience level that can make things easier.

1) Make sure your guitar is properly setup so that the action is as low as possible. With low action you won't have to press down so hard

2) Use extra light coated or treated strings. Extra light strings are thinner and easier to press down. Coated/Treated strings are easier on the fingers until you can build up strength and callouses.
 
If I've misunderstood your problem, post a video.

Mostly it's practice!
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Skydome on January 20, 2015, 05:50:59 am
I am struggling too.

I believe I have my fingers in the correct position for the D chord, what I find I am struggling with is two things.

1- I can never really get the strings to ring out clearly, once I do get one to ring out clearly the other two are stuffed and once I get the other one or two right I've stuffed another one, I can't seem to figure out finger placement so this isn't an issue.

second; I too am finding I have to really press down on the strings, and it hurts, I'm guessing I just have to build up finger strength.

Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: hilts17 on January 20, 2015, 04:17:51 pm
I am struggling too.

I believe I have my fingers in the correct position for the D chord, what I find I am struggling with is two things.

1- I can never really get the strings to ring out clearly, once I do get one to ring out clearly the other two are stuffed and once I get the other one or two right I've stuffed another one, I can't seem to figure out finger placement so this isn't an issue.

second; I too am finding I have to really press down on the strings, and it hurts, I'm guessing I just have to build up finger strength.

See tips from deadeye in the post above yours. There are 5 tips all together. Read all 5. Plus once you build up calluses on your finger tips it will be much easier to press down on the strings.

I know what you're going thru. When I started the BC I struggled right away with the D chord and it's the very first lesson in the BC. I thought, "Great, first chord and I'm struggling already!" BUT, stick with it, keep working at it and just like me you will get it. I'm on stage 5 now but I would say after 2-3 weeks in Stage 1, I was able to make the D chord ring clear every time. You'll get it too!
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Skydome on January 21, 2015, 11:04:08 am
I'll do what deadeye said.

So the way I understand his post, is that in terms of positioning, I need to have my hands arched and push down on the strings?

I tried doing that a bit earlier on today and it felt very strange, I guess I just have to develop the muscles to hold my hands arched so that it doesn't hurt/feel weird ?
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Drubbing on January 21, 2015, 11:14:03 am
second; I too am finding I have to really press down on the strings, and it hurts, I'm guessing I just have to build up finger strength.


No, you have to develop finger technique, arched fingers, not hands. it takes hardly any strength at all to fret chords. People press too hard because their finger tips are too soft and often lying too flat, and squash them across other strings. So they press harder and…so it circles.

Apply the lightest touch possible to the top of the string, keep plucking it. Press it down gently til it only just contacts the fretboard, and it rings clear. That's probably 90% less pressure than you're using.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Skydome on January 22, 2015, 03:27:27 am
Interesting. So I only apply enough pressure so it just contacts the fret board not so it hurts my fingers?

I've started practicing the d chord with a beginners acoustic guitar I bought a bit ago which has nylon strings I believe, so I think I'll try and get the d chord done on that with softer strings than move on to my guitar.

Though I did notice today with my both my electric and acoustic guitar that I sort of got the d note, there was still some buzzing more so on my electric guitar for whatever reason than the acoustic, so I guess I must be getting somewhat close.

I'll keep practicing on both those and I'll practice with putting less pressure on the strings as well.

EDIT: Good news, I believe I finally got it to ring out, I still feel as though it is a little bit buzzy but certainly not as bad as what it was, I can at least hear an actual note rather buzzing.

I'll keep doing the D chord for a bit today to make sure I have it down than I'll move on to the next chord next week and get that one done than revisit this one to make sure I can still do it.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Monkeyhands on February 21, 2015, 12:30:29 pm
Hi guys,

I've been playing about a month now and my problem is with the strumming rather than the fretboard end.  I find it really difficult with any cord where I don't have to strum every string. Like with this D chord I quite often catch the A string as well. Does anyone have any tips to help with that? Although I suspect the answer is just practice practice practice!  But As Justin says don't practice things wrong.

Any advice would be gratefully received.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: lunarscope on February 21, 2015, 01:17:52 pm
Hi guys,

I've been playing about a month now and my problem is with the strumming rather than the fretboard end.  I find it really difficult with any cord where I don't have to strum every string. Like with this D chord I quite often catch the A string as well. Does anyone have any tips to help with that? Although I suspect the answer is just practice practice practice!  But As Justin says don't practice things wrong.

Any advice would be gratefully received.

As a newbie myself (six weeks in and about to start Stage 3), I ensure that when practising chords (pick, strum, pick) I always start on the correct string - it's basically the string above the 'shape' your fretting fingers have formed. Now when strumming, my right hand naturally strums from the correct string. You need to create a connection between the chord shape and the strum starting position. I've been trying to explain this to my mate who is learning with me but he struggles because he started off strumming all strings for every chord and so doesn't have the connection and his chords now sound wrong.

To the OP, keep at it, suddenly you will find that it all comes together and new chords then get easier to learn. Follow Justin's practice schedule (15-20) minutes each day and you will soon notice an improvement. Have a listen to my SoundCloud recordings which show my efforts at three and a half weeks by strictly following the schedule.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: m_c on February 21, 2015, 01:59:15 pm
Monkeyhands, it's all down to practise, but I wouldn't worry too much about it just now.

It's one of these things that as your guitar skills in general develop, you'll get better at. Worrying too much about it now, I think is more likely to hold you back. Certainly play a bit slower and concentrate on not hitting the strings during chord practise, but don't spend hours at this point trying not to hit the string. You should have plenty other more contstructive things to concentrate on.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: tobyjenner on February 21, 2015, 06:46:30 pm
Monkeyhands

When you do your strum pick strum routine, start on the thickest string for each chord, the strum the remaining string. ie

E pick bass 6th string only then strum strings 5 to 1.
A pick bass 5th string only then strum strings 4 to 1.
D pick bass 4th string only then strum strings 3 to 1.

This will help your strumming hand fall naturally on the 'top' string for all chords.

BTW Stitch explained this far better, in a response to one of my post last year 8)


Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: HaverstockWill on February 22, 2015, 10:11:17 am
Hello - am still struggling with the D chord after about 6 weeks.

I found early on that the best way of making the D chord ring cleanly was to keep the 1st joint on my second finger straight, rather than bent as Justin shows in the vid.  This means that only the second knuckle is bent and the finger looks straight and rigid, but the chord generally sounds good.

While this created a clean sound it seemed to make for slow and awkward chord changes - so I tried to rework the second finger to bend at the first knuckle too.  This caused consistent buzzing on the top E again, and now I'm a bit of a no man's land as I don't have a decisive approach with this finger and any chord sequences including D are a bit of a disaster.

Should I return to my original unorthodox approach and try to build speed up or bend my 2nd finger as per the video and try and work on the accuracy?

I'm putting in plenty of time with one min changes, any combination including D (A-D, E-D, C-D, G-D) but no breakthrough as yet.  (I'd tried another course before, so have some familiarity with C and G).

Thanks in advance!
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: stitch101 on February 23, 2015, 04:37:06 pm
Monkeyhands

Practice your chords by plucking the bass note first then strum the chord.
For the D chord pluck just the D string them strum the chord if you hit the A string don't
strum the chord. Start over pluck the D string then strum the chord.

Do the same with the A chord pluck the A string them strum the chord if you hit the E
string by mistake stop and start over with the A string. Do this a few minutes a day
and in a week or so your problem will be gone.
 
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: sergeanthawk on March 07, 2015, 01:54:56 pm
Hi, I am facing the same problem as monkeyhands but I do not understand what you mean by plucking the bass notes first and then strumming. Could you explain it as which number string instead of the string's note?
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: shadowscott007 on March 07, 2015, 02:20:55 pm
Sarge,

Take a piece of paper and write down the string numbers 1 (thinnest) to 6 (thickest)

Then write down the note names next to each.

http://justinguitar.com/en/BC-133-OpenStringNotes.php

The bass note is the lowest string played in the chord.  For the D (and the A and the E) these are open strings.

Pluck the lowest note of the chord, then strum the whole chord.  You can include or exclude the low note you just plucked when you at your discretion.  Sounds a bit different each way.  Do whichever you like the sound of, or practice it each way.

Shadow

Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: sergeanthawk on March 08, 2015, 03:24:35 am

Hi, thanks for the tip. I'll do that but I do not understand how plucking the bass string will help with fixing my fingering? I pluck the string with my right hand but fret with my left hand right? How will that help with keeping my middle finger bent while fretting?
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: stitch101 on March 08, 2015, 06:00:41 am
Hi, thanks for the tip. I'll do that but I do not understand how plucking the bass string will help with fixing my fingering? I pluck the string with my right hand but fret with my left hand right? How will that help with keeping my middle finger bent while fretting?

Monkeyhand  problem was with strumming not with fretting. If your problem is with finger the chord it won't help at all
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: sergeanthawk on March 08, 2015, 07:10:27 am
Oh man, I cannot believe I quoted the wrong person. It should be the user above monkeyhands.

When I fret the D Chord, my middle finger isn't bent like how Justin does it in his video. Instead, it is straighter. This sure makes for a cleaner sound as when I bent it like Justin does in the video, my middle finger does not seem to apply enough pressure to fret the first string without it buzzing/muting.

Should I follow Justin and bend my fingers or should I stick to my style to have the sound come off clean?
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: stitch101 on March 08, 2015, 08:01:35 am
Everybodies finger are different so if you're doing something a little different and it works
for you keep doing it.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: pt3r on March 08, 2015, 09:44:44 am
Yep guitar playing is no exact science, take Justin's videos as a guideline but trying to finger the chords in exactly the same way as him will more often than not cause frustration unless you have exactly the same hands as Justin with the same flexibility and strength etc. Remember; if it it sounds good it is good.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Luvntravln on March 18, 2015, 03:59:38 am
I hear you all about practice practice.

I am 72 and spend a bit of time each day and while I can go from D to A or E or back and forth between A and E, I cannot lay down the D no matter what I try. The 3rd finger is always lagging behind the 2nd finger!

Suggestions because I really want to move forward but believe that if I can't smoothly get the first three cords I should not go to the 4th - Amin.

Thanks! :-[
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: pt3r on March 18, 2015, 08:30:23 am
Practice playing your individual D-chord nice and easy strum-pic-strum. Only when you are confident that your D-chord comes out clean should you integrate it in chord changes. Those changes should be practiced slowly in the beginning. No use rushing things. Practice does not make perfect only permanent.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: m_c on March 18, 2015, 11:55:41 pm
Luvntravln, personally I'd say don't let it hold you back from learning the next chord.

One thing I often found during the beginners course, was sometimes my progress would grind to a halt with certain things, be that a certain chord or technique, and by moving to the next stage and learning something new/a bit harder, the earlier progress would improve as the problem thing became relatively easier.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: shadowscott007 on March 19, 2015, 12:56:49 am
Seconding what m_c said.  Some things are going to lag a bit.  But the work you do with additional chords pays reverse dividends in terms of improving your overall strength dexterity and expertise that will help you with the old stuff via learning new stuff.

Its kinda weird but for me anyway a lot of my progress/improvement happens while I'm not watching.  While i'm doing something else.  All of a sudden that E/G# that was giving me coniptions in Your Song (Justin lesson and The Weight (Justin lesson) is just working for me in Spirit of Radio.  I am not saying I didn't practice it, because I did, but it seemed very much like an exercise in frustration, but the transition between not really working to working pretty good happened while I was doing other things.

So keep at it.  The D chord will continue to come up in the songs associated with the lessons and one day you will be working on the C or G chord and notice "holy crap my D chord works, when did that happen?!"

Shadow



Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: rockstardevil on April 03, 2015, 08:22:26 am
Hi i just started playing the basic chords and have been practicing. But currently i am getting a problem, my first finger tends to bend outwards, when i get a perfect tune and this has been causing me a lot of pain when i play the chords for more than 5 minutes. I tried placing the finger justin used in the video, but the finger keeps touching the above string and i am not getting a proper tune.

Please help!!!
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: tobyjenner on April 03, 2015, 02:47:27 pm
Don't worry about the fingers bending outwards a little (towards the nut) but if it touches the 4th string, try rolling your knuckles toward you. That should help the tip of the finger to hit the string more horizontally and away from the 4th.

Hope that helps

8)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Motion2082 on April 11, 2015, 04:29:21 am
Hi guys,

I have a question regarding the Chords D and A.

On your website Chord D only plays the first 4 strings.

I have purchased a Progressive Guitar Method by Gary Turner and Brenton White and they claim that the D chord is play with the 5th string A played open as well. I'm confused because a lot of their chords are different than yours.

Another one I noticed is the A Chord. You claim only 5 strings are played but this Guitar Method says 6.

I have attached the example of what I mean below.

(http://i62.tinypic.com/21e89xe.jpg)
(http://i60.tinypic.com/v2uukm.jpg)

Could you please help educate me as to which is the right one.

Cheers,
Paul
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: close2u on April 11, 2015, 10:30:04 am
@ Motion2082

A D chord played with an open A string is still a D chord.
But ... it is what is called an inversion.
D is made up of three notes: D, A, F#.
When you play a 4-string D chord you play, D, A, D, F#.
The bass note is the root note.
Add in the 5th open A string and you play: A, D, A, D, F#.
This is called an inversion.
It is still a D chord as it has only those 3 notes.
But the bass note is not the root.

Similarly with a 6-string A chord you have: E, A, E, A, C#, E (the 3 notes of an A chord and nothing else).

BUT
In the majority of situations and songs and real-life uses, you play the 4-string and 5-string versions.

That book is failing to do its job by not explaining this.

I recommend you stick to Justin's course and beginners method.

:)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: stitch101 on April 11, 2015, 09:39:18 pm
They are naming the chords. If you play any note from the chord before the rot it is slash chord .
The D would be D/A  the the A would be A/E check out Justin's lesson on slash chords.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: shadowscott007 on April 11, 2015, 11:04:46 pm
The B and Bb chords bother me, too.  Looks like they are NOT showing the 5th string root note... odd. 

I could forgive them showing all the notes that "work"; low A for the D chord, low E for the A chord, low E for the C chord and all... but not showing the 5th string root for the A-shape B chords... really?

It does say "beginner", but still... I would rather see "more" notes rather than have some missing.

Maybe when you buy book 2 you get more dots?

Shadow
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Mehrdad on July 22, 2015, 08:04:50 pm
Hi. Can you play d chord (or any other chord) the way you want like? I play d chord with my first finger barred across the second fret of the first three strings and my second finger on the third fret of the second string can I play like that? Til now I didn't have any problems with this shape but does it really matter to play with three fingers? It's really easier this way and more efficient. you can save one finger!
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: shadowscott007 on July 22, 2015, 10:59:17 pm
Yes.

But... there are reasons to learn the 3 finger version.  The D chord is perhaps the best chord to play around with suspensions.  With the standard grip you lift off the second finger letting the high e string ring, then put the second finger back down on the second fret, and then put your pinky down on the third fret.

These kinds of movements happen in tons of songs with the D chord.  If you can only play the D chord the way you describe, you will be limiting yourself.

It is rarely a good thing to do something just because it is easier.  If you can play the D in the standard grip, and choose an alternate grip great!  If you play the alternate grip because you can't play the standard grip I would have to say that is not good and you should expend the effort to learn the standard grip.

My two pennies.

Shadow
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: sylvia11361 on August 19, 2015, 10:39:44 pm
I play the chords and it keeps buzzing. :'( I press regulary and it doesnt work and if even if I press hard it keeps buzzing. My fingers hurt and im pressing hard but the sound doesnt come out. I just got this guitar 2 days ago and yesterday it sounded okay but now it buzzes too much.It couls be the formation but Im doing exactly what you're doing. I dont understand... I just started yesterday. When I play the a chord the i hear plucking sounds and buzzes. Im so confused. Is it just me? Im soo mad right now and I want to quit.... :-[
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: stitch101 on August 19, 2015, 11:38:05 pm
Try playing each note in the D chord separately using your index finger. Does it buzz and on which
string. If it buzzes it's not you, your guitar needs to be set up. If it doesn't buzz then you are doing
something wrong when you are playing the D chord.

Does it buzz when you play other chords?
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: 12-string_Doug on August 19, 2015, 11:49:52 pm
Stitch beat me to it, and with a simpler method than what I was going to suggest. (Trying Dsus2, Dsus4, and D6 shapes. You'll get to those chords eventually, and will probably enjoy them, too.)

So all I've got to say is don't quit; it gets better over time.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: shadowscott007 on August 20, 2015, 11:38:02 am
Also make sure your fingers are as close to the frets as possible.

Shadow
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: hilts17 on August 20, 2015, 11:57:40 am
I agree with Doug. Don't quit! It gets better.

When I first started last year I could not play a clean D chord the first few times. I thought, "Great, I can't even play the first chord I'm supposed to learn. This is going to be too hard."

BUT, within a couple days it got a whole lot better. I could play the D chord clean. Then I struggled with getting a clean sounding G chord. It was more of a struggle than D. But again, it got easier the more I practised. Heck, I'm almost finished stage 6 of the BC and can play many songs. Try not to let the frustration beat you. Watch the lessons over and over again and practise every day. The hours and hours of practise is totally worth it.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Guitar_noob on August 20, 2015, 03:08:53 pm
Play each string of the chord one at a time. You will easily notice which string buzzes. When you know which one is the problem, look at your hand. Is your finger close enough to the fret ? Is the string half muted by another finger ?

One other thing to consider : your finger tips will hurt during the first weeks. If it hurts too much, your hand will refuse on its own to press the string hard enough.

And of course, if none of the above is the reason. Consider checking your guitar settings.

Every new chord fingering takes time. Don't rush it. Don't panic. If it's not okay today, it will be better tomorrow, or the day after, or in a week. Your body / brain learns when resting.

New things get easier and easier to learn as you progress though so don't give up :). Hey, you only started 2 days ago ;).
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: SteveSR on August 21, 2015, 07:41:42 pm
BACKGROUND: I am a 67+ y.o. with short fat fingers, so this is a struggle for me. I'm right-handed. I'v been practicing for about 3 weeks about 6 days a week on a beginner Fender electric guitar. I start each session with some of Justin's finger stretching exercise as a long-term investment.  I am finally able to practice a little over 10 minutes a day w/o my fingers killing me. I am close to getting D, A, and E  chords sounding pretty good using strum-pick-strum, so, soon, I will be moving on to Justin's transition exercises. I'm determined to learn "the right way."

Q: I am concerned that I am not positioning my right arm properly on the electric guitar and not positioning my right hand properly. Justin's early lessons demonstrate positioning the right arm on an acoustic guitar, which, of course, is substantially thicker than the electric. I am concerned I am learning some bad habits positioning my right arm and hand, including how far up or down the guitar to strike the guitar strings. Does Justin have a video that focuses on these right arm/hand topics for an electric guitar? Another video on YouTube that shows proper right arm/hand technique?

Thanks much, Steve
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: shadowscott007 on August 21, 2015, 10:35:16 pm
Steve,

I assume your guitar has 3 pick ups.  You want to be striking the strings somewhere around the middle pickup.   The exact location is kinda up in the air.  Really, any where between the neck and the bridge pick ups works. 

As far as arm position goes here is a place to start.  Stand up with you arms relaxed and by your sides.  Bend your arm at the elbow at about 90 degrees fingers out as if you were about to shake hands, but keep your at your side.  Now rotate your arm so your palm touches your belly.  Some thing sorta in that area.  For me that ends up putting my hand a bit high and a bit too much toward the center line of my body (looks to be about where BB King's hand ended up.)

Anyhow now sit down with the guitar sitting on the right leg and repeat (a stool works better than a chair for this).  Stay very relaxed.  Arm to 90, rotate so palm is over the middle pick up.  Your elbow will probably move away from your body and forward a bit.  That is okay.

Don't scrunch you shoulders up like you are shrugging.  A lot of beginners do this without even realizing it.  Keep your shoulders loose.  Sit up straight avoid craning your neck too much.  Relax and breath.  A lot of beginners I have taught seem to hold their breath.

Shado




Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: SteveSR on August 22, 2015, 03:15:42 am
Shodo,

Thx for responding and for the info. You are correct: My Fender beginner electric ("Starcaster") has 3 pickups. (I bought the "Starcaster" from Amazon about 3 yrs ago and it collected dust until I recently retired.) Following Justin's theme of maintaining the guitar in roughly the same position, when I practice, I am usually sitting in a chair but wearing the strap so that, if I stand up, the guitar will be close to the same position as sitting.

Re right arm and right hand, when I am preparing to practice tomorrow, I'll re-review your post and attempt to execute.

Thx again!
Steve

PS Justin's Beginner songbook arrived in today's mail. Looking fwd to exploring it some after doing some of the D-A-E chord-transition exercises for a week or two. As I take advantage of Justin's excellent teaching, I'll be buying more of his products!

Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: SiegeFrog on August 22, 2015, 08:47:12 pm
I am finally able to practice a little over 10 minutes a day w/o my fingers killing me. I am close to getting D, A, and E  chords sounding pretty good using strum-pick-strum, so, soon, I will be moving on to Justin's transition exercises. I'm determined to learn "the right way."

I'm not sure I'm understanding your post correctly, but Justin has designed the BC to progress stage to stage. When you're in Stage 1, you should watch all the Stage 1 videos (including the last one that details the practice routine) and practice all the skills taught. He has a very detailed practice routine for each stage and milestones to reach before advancing to the next stage. You should be practicing chord changes as well as the strum-pick-strum. Also, you should be trying to play in rhythm. If your fingers haven't toughened up enough yet to do the full 20 minute routine at once, consider splitting it up and do half in the morning and half in the evening. I'm just imagining someone only doing strum-pick-strum and thinking your missing about 2/3 of your practice.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: 12-string_Doug on August 22, 2015, 09:48:25 pm
I am finally able to practice a little over 10 minutes a day w/o my fingers killing me.
  This might or might not help: I'm just wondering what the Strat has for strings (gauge). If it has .011 or heavier, maybe a set of .010 would bring less finger misery than the present ones. (As far as the effort needed for pressing down to form the chords, more so than the eventual toughening of fingertips.)
  Also, was it set up properly when you first got it? Maybe a good setup could also help reduce the effort needed to form the chords.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: hilts17 on August 22, 2015, 10:07:26 pm
I agree with Doug about getting the guitar set up properly. It was the best money I ever spent, taking mine to a good luthier. It was like night and day. He made the guitar so much easier to play because I didn't have to press the strings nearly as hard. Even made it possible for me to play the F barre chord!
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: SteveSR on August 23, 2015, 02:04:08 am
SiegeFrog, 12-string_Doug, and hilts17,

Thx for the additional responses. I appreciate the general advice, given in response to my "BACKGROUND" intro. I think that Shado addressed my question re right arm and right hand placement and where to strike the string with the pick, and at today's practice I followed his instructions. Thx again Shodo!

Perhaps I missed it, but I still don't think Justin adequately covers right arm & hand placement on an electric in his early lessons. In lesson BC-106 [starting @ 1:57], Justin discusses right arm placement on an acoustic, but he doesn't discuss an electric at all. When he finally demos an electric (starting at 3:56), it is in terms of placement of a strap, not placement of the right arm and right hand and where to strike the string with the pick. He then (starting at 6:01) discusses left hand placement, nothing about the right arm/hand.

In lessons BC-111, 112, & 113, Justin covers the D, A, and E chords, but, to the degree that the right hand is ever shown, it is using an acoustic.

Don't get me wrong: The lessons, over-all, have been excellent so far, but I suggest that there is a hole in his coverage, ie, on an electric, right arm and right hand placement and where to strike the string(s) with the pick.

SiegeFrog's advice to split up the session into 2 parts is well taken. In fact, even giving myself a 5 minute break allows me to practice significantly longer.

Be assured that I have been methodically progressing through the lessons and occasionally preview a few ahead of where I am actually practicing. Also, for fun, I occasionally roam around Justin's web site, which is how I found the finger-stretching lesson, which I see as absolutely essential to my long-term progress, especially given my aging, short, fat fingers.

12-string_Doug & hilts17, Not sure of the gauge of the strings on my Fender. They were the ones that came with it. I'm finally starting to adapt to them, so I am hesitant to mess with whatever gauge they are and the current set up. But if I get frustrated again, I'll consider taking it to a "guitar-smith." Thx for bringing this option to my attention.

Best regards, Steve
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Dr Winterbourne on August 23, 2015, 01:54:54 pm
Wíth regards to right hand on electric, once you are holding the pick correctly and comfortably, I would let my ears guide me. It is early days for you, I understand, but you will find that where you hit the string with your pick will alter the sound. And I would say hit the string at the place where it makes the sound you want for the song or lick or bit you are playing.

For example, if you pick right in front of the bridge, the tone is very brittle, very tense and trebly. Perfect for Dick Dale surf rock. The further forward you go, the less these thin trebly qualities will dominate. As an experiment, try strumming above the 12th fret - very warm, very smooth. It is not for everyday, but sometimes I'll strum there, for effect (and I usually pick there when I tune my strings.) As you develop you will discover things like harmonics at certain places on the strings, and you may want to strike or avoid these harmonic points.

In short, let your ears guide you.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: iChow on October 02, 2015, 04:54:54 am
Although I'm on stage 2 right now I was wondering if the way I position my hands to play D chord currently is okay (ie. it is not going to cause me problems later on). If I need to correct it might as well do it now. Here are some pictures: (http://i60.tinypic.com/2wg7gnb.jpg), (http://i61.tinypic.com/eg8njs.jpg).
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: close2u on October 02, 2015, 06:37:25 am
Your middle finger 1st knuckle is almost bending backwards, this is not helping your whole hand arch around and for your tips to be pressing from an optimum angle on the strings.
Your 3rd finger is coming from the side instead of above because of this.
Your index finger is also a little too straight at the 1st knuckle.
Look very carefully at the video 'still frame' and the pic on this page (http://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-111-D-chord.php) to see how the 1st finger knuckles need to bend to allow your fingers and hand to 'arch'.
Your hands and fingers seem long and large - but you must bend not keep them straight.
Hope that helps.
Good luck.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: stitch101 on October 02, 2015, 04:35:38 pm
I know Justin want you to put your thumb in the middle of the neck at the beginning to help
strengthen your hand but in your case with your long fingers I'd suggest moving your thumb
up form the center. And angle your guitar up a little more so you can bring your hand down more
(like in the link Close posted)
Look at how straight Justin's wrist is compared to yours. By moving your thumb up and rotating
your hand you will save yourself a lot of wrist pain in the future.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: suzidownunder on October 03, 2015, 11:44:01 am
When I play D, my third finger is last down  trailing about a beat. It doesn't seem to be a problem - just wondering if others experience the same?
I reached the intermediate stage and play many songs but still wander back through the beginner stages to brush up.

Sent from my SM-N915G using Tapatalk

Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: iChow on October 04, 2015, 07:28:17 am
Your middle finger 1st knuckle is almost bending backwards, this is not helping your whole hand arch around and for your tips to be pressing from an optimum angle on the strings.
Your 3rd finger is coming from the side instead of above because of this.
Your index finger is also a little too straight at the 1st knuckle.
Look very carefully at the video 'still frame' and the pic on this page (http://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-111-D-chord.php) to see how the 1st finger knuckles need to bend to allow your fingers and hand to 'arch'.
Your hands and fingers seem long and large - but you must bend not keep them straight.
Hope that helps.
Good luck.
Thanks you and stitch101 for your replies.  I was wondering if this is better? (http://i59.tinypic.com/2nu16ie.jpg)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: stitch101 on October 05, 2015, 03:50:28 am
I'd say yes . Your wrist is straight and your fingers aren't bent backwards. Both solving future pain issues.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: justinguitar on November 04, 2015, 12:05:21 pm
@SteveSR - agree that I need to put some additional material in for electric guitar. Have added in some FAQ, but will do something in video next update!

@suzidownunder - the "air changes" exercise should help, do try and get them to come down all together, especially if you've reached intermediate level!
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: JaminCat on December 02, 2015, 07:29:38 pm
Hi,

I've been playing for just over two weeks now.

I've noticed that when playing the D chord my 1st finger is muting the B string. Even though this is the case the chord rings out nicely because my 3rd finger is pressing the B string at the 3rd fret.

I know that the D6 chord is essentially the same as the D major but with the B string open. So my question is should I work on the placement of my 1st finger now? or not worry about it until I get to the D6 chord?

Thanks
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: shadowscott007 on December 02, 2015, 07:43:07 pm
Not sure you need to bother, for now.  But I would choose the D7 chord to get working rather than the D6...

It gets played a lot more commonly than the D6 shape in that shape.

It will be just a little bit easier to get working because the B string will be just a tad closer to the fret board as it passes your index finger.

Shadow
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: close2u on December 03, 2015, 08:49:58 pm
[quote author=JaminCat link=topic=16420.msg332989#msg332989 date=1449084578

I've noticed that when playing the D chord my 1st finger is muting the B string. Even though this is the case the chord rings out nicely because my 3rd finger is pressing the B string at the 3rd fret.

[/quote]

That does not make sense.
How can your 1st finger on fret 2 mute the note your 3rd finger is playing on fret 3?
You can not mute a fretted note from a position behind where it is fretted.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: shadowscott007 on December 03, 2015, 11:45:20 pm
In the big ole for what it's worth department, I interpreted it to mean "touching" as in "would be muting if" not for being fretted higher up.

Shadow
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: m_c on December 03, 2015, 11:52:12 pm
That does not make sense.
How can your 1st finger on fret 2 mute the note your 3rd finger is playing on fret 3?
You can not mute a fretted note from a position behind where it is fretted.

I suspect Jamin is aware that his 1st finger is touching the 2nd string and is worried it's a bad thing to have happen, but given the 2nd string is fretted higher up, it doesn't actually affect the chord.
It probably isn't a good thing, but as long as the chord sounds clear, I wouldn't be worried about it at this point.

As you practice and learn more chords, you'll gradually improve finger position, and be able to make the slight corrections needed to get the required strings to ring out clearly.
I know when I play a C, I have a habit of my 2nd finger catching the 5th string, but it doesn't affect what I'm playing. I probably should work on it not happening, but it's not a problem for now.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: JaminCat on December 04, 2015, 08:11:34 am
In the big ole for what it's worth department, I interpreted it to mean "touching" as in "would be muting if" not for being fretted higher up.

Shadow

I suspect Jamin is aware that his 1st finger is touching the 2nd string and is worried it's a bad thing to have happen, but given the 2nd string is fretted higher up, it doesn't actually affect the chord.
It probably isn't a good thing, but as long as the chord sounds clear, I wouldn't be worried about it at this point.

As you practice and learn more chords, you'll gradually improve finger position, and be able to make the slight corrections needed to get the required strings to ring out clearly.
I know when I play a C, I have a habit of my 2nd finger catching the 5th string, but it doesn't affect what I'm playing. I probably should work on it not happening, but it's not a problem for now.

Yes thats that I mean. I was just fiddling around placing each finger and then plucking each string around it and found that my 1st finger was muting the 2nd string.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: close2u on December 07, 2015, 06:30:02 am
Yes thats that I mean. I was just fiddling around placing each finger and then plucking each string around it and found that my 1st finger was muting the 2nd string.

BUT

When you play the D CHORD, the 2nd string rings out right?
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: JaminCat on December 07, 2015, 08:52:39 am
BUT

When you play the D CHORD, the 2nd string rings out right?

Yes it does.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Quinnicus on January 02, 2016, 09:17:23 pm
Hi all

I got my first guitar (electric) in the Amazon sales the other day.  Ive never even picked one up before and decided on a new hobby.  Anyway, yesterday i went through the theory stuff in the 'getting started' section. 

Today i have tried and tried at having a go at the next part The D Cord and i am struggling.  Its my fingers - especially my 3rd finger on the second string.  Its always touching the 1st string and...well.. Muting it.

I am a large person with kinda fat fingers and i believe this is the reason.  So the questions are:

I know ive only had this guitar for 'hours' and have had a go at the d cord for about 1 of them, but its put me on a downer at the moment.  So any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Rossco01 on January 02, 2016, 09:29:18 pm
I think it's definitely possible for you to play I'm sure others who have had similar challenges will reply soon.  Why not try - if you haven't already done so- trying A and E. E in particular should be a little easier.  Above all keep going it will take many hours and many days of practice to become competent but you can do it if you keep going.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: shadowscott007 on January 02, 2016, 10:54:48 pm
Your fingers aren't too fat.  I know it is hard to believe that, but it is true. 

Try to make sure your fingers are nicely curle; and the tip, the last joint/section is coming down square to the fingerboard.

Also realize that there is more than one spot on your finger tip that can press on the string.  So if you third finger is muting the first string move the third finger tip a bit further towards the third string.  Still keeping it as square to the fingerboard as you can with nicely arched fingers.

Shadow
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: rsophiuchi on January 03, 2016, 02:00:53 am
Hi Quinnicus,

I am a beginner and have only been playing for a few weeks. I also had particular trouble with the D chord, which I found frustrating as it seems not to be difficult for most people. I found the E chord easier so maybe try that one as Rossco01 suggested.

I kept paying particular attention to the D chord at the beginning of every practise session but then moved on to something else so I didn't get too disheartened. Finally my D chord is starting to sound OK when I play it using strum and pick, and I'm also get a much better sound when I play it in songs. Just stick with it, but also work on other areas when you can make more progress.

Susan

Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: jamiebell94 on January 04, 2016, 06:02:55 pm
Hi All

I've been playing guitar for a couple of years but recently decided to start from scratch and learn properly using the foundation courses. I'm finding the technique Justin suggested for the first few chords a little uncomfortable (i.e thumb behind the neck and palm not touching the guitar). I'm not sure if I'm doing it wrong or if I'm just not used to it. I've always brought my thumb up over the neck to mute certain strings whilst playing open chords up until this point. Should I continue using the same technique or use the one suggested in the videos? I'm not sure since from Justin's comments it appears I'll be using the former more as the course progresses.

Thanks!
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: javianser on January 05, 2016, 07:48:28 pm
Hi, everybody!

I've started practising guitar for around 10 days now and I just started with the 1-minute-change activities proposed by Justin. I'm quite happy because I'm around the 20 changes per minute. I started practising the A-D changes and I have found some problems with the D chord, specifically with the finger that presses the thinnest string (the middle finger). My fingers don't hurt anymore, but I feel pretty uncomfortable with the position of that finger, as if it was unnatural... I don't know how to explain it. Any tips to make it easier or is it just a matter of time?

Thanks a lot and sorry about my bad English. Oh, and Happy New Year! :D
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: shadowscott007 on January 05, 2016, 08:07:10 pm
@jamieb

If you are getting all the strings to ring clearly I see no reason to 'revert' to the beginner's grip.  That tends to be the finger hand posture that allow a raw beginner the best chance of getting all the strings to ring true.

@Javan

From what I remember from my beginner days, almost everything I learned felt uncomfortable and unnatural.  So without more detail or a picture I am gonna go with that...

Shadow
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: steepens on January 05, 2016, 08:15:43 pm
Javianser, using a finger in new and different ways is expected to feel different, it's par for the course. It will get much easier and feel more 'natural' the more you practice it. I found it interesting that Justin noted James Taylor's way of playing the D is different (the index/pointer and middle fingers are swapped), but doing this would prevent use of the index finger on the G string as an anchor for E to A to D chord switches. I would recommend sticking with the traditional fingering as shown. And nice job on the chord changes!
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: justinguitar on January 07, 2016, 08:38:28 am
@jamiebell94
The idea here is to build stregth in the hand so that power chords and barre chords are not as much shock - as well as helping people use fingertips correctly. So up to you, if you're getting the chords clean and you can already play barre chords you should be fine.

@javianser
everything is hard at the beginning - give it a few months to get new things feeling comfortable!

@Quinnicus
When I started teaching back in Tasmania I taught loads of farmers with massive fingers, and I was thinking they wouldn't be able to play - but they all did fine - it just takes practice! Stick at it and i'm sure you get there! :)


Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Fmaj7 on February 11, 2016, 07:40:48 am

 :) FFS: Fat Finger Syndrom[/b]  ;D

@Quinnicus
When I started teaching back in Tasmania I taught loads of farmers with massive fingers, and I was thinking they wouldn't be able to play - but they all did fine - it just takes practice! Stick at it and i'm sure you get there! :)

As I saw the fingers of Andres Segovia first - I can´t believe it, very fat fingers, but his excellent sound is great - he played on a high level classical guitar. Ok - there is a bit more space between the strings.

Or look at  the vids of Don Ross, Andy McKee on youtube - big Fingers and big music.

Imho a good shape of the Fretting-Hand is most important to manage the D chord accurate. Sometimes it helps to let the thumb comes down a bit towards the middle line of the neck, so you win a bit more space to set the fingers down in a good way.

Greets from Germany
Fmaj7

Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: effluent on March 14, 2016, 06:45:52 pm
I am having a lot of trouble with this chord. It seems to be the hardest out of the first several. Is that uncommon to think it's that hard? Justin says the G string is hard, but that one I could do right away (although still not perfect I can at least make it work).

On the D, for me to have both the middle and ring finger down, my middle finger has to be bent over so far I'm using the flat of the nail to hold down the string. Otherwise I can't bend the ring finger over far enough not to mute the bottom string.

Maybe it's because my fingers are so short and fat. I never realized I had short fingers until I started to learn to play. I measured my hand, and it's just the tiniest tick above average (for a male) at 7.5 inches (avg 7.44). But my fingers aren't as long as my palm. My middle finger is only 3.2 inches (avg 3.72) long.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Rossco01 on March 14, 2016, 07:53:00 pm
D is not an easy chord so dont worry about that. You should be muti g anything ( unless youre trying to mute the low E with your thumb... which I doubt).

1st finger should be on the g string 2nd fret, middle finger on high E string 2nd fret and third finger on b string third fret. You play the high E, b, g and d strings only ( although don't worry too much about this to start with).

Might be worth taking a picture so we can see where you are struggling.


Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: effluent on March 14, 2016, 09:22:04 pm
D is not an easy chord so dont worry about that. You should be muti g anything ( unless youre trying to mute the low E with your thumb... which I doubt).

1st finger should be on the g string 2nd fret, middle finger on high E string 2nd fret and third finger on b string third fret. You play the high E, b, g and d strings only ( although don't worry too much about this to start with).

Might be worth taking a picture so we can see where you are struggling.

Sure here's a photo. You can see how curled my middle finger is. If I straighten it I can't get the ring finger down without it flattening and muting the bottom string.

(http://i.imgur.com/tU0E6ai.jpg)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Tobsen on March 14, 2016, 10:33:16 pm
Hi effluent,

having a look at your picture I suggest to keep your wrist more straight. This will allow your fingers (especially your middle) to hit the strings in a better angle (e.g perpendicular to the fretboard). When I do the D chord my wrist is even bend into the opposite direction as yours and my thumb reaches far over the neck (which later allows you to mute the low E).
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: shadowscott007 on March 14, 2016, 10:41:30 pm
Your fingers are not bending at the palm and you are trying to make up for it with the other joints and bending your wrist.  And your palm is too close to the neck.

You want your hand shaped like you are loosely holding a grapefruit in your palm in front of you, wrist straight.

Shadow
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: effluent on March 14, 2016, 10:47:57 pm
I realize looking at that first picture that I contorted a littler more than normal due to trying to take the pic.

Here I can do it a lot better and easier but I have to really grab a hold of it-

(http://i.imgur.com/UnzlnbJ.jpg)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: joueur de guitare on March 14, 2016, 10:56:16 pm


Move your thumb behind the neck, not over the top.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: effluent on March 14, 2016, 10:58:42 pm
Move your thumb behind the neck, not over the top.

I know I'm not supposed to do that, just showing how easily I can do it that way. I've tried to treat it like it will electrocute me if I touch the bottom of the neck and what not but I end up bending my wrist all the way to be able to reach. Here is my trying to hold a grapefruit and not touch the bottom of the neck while also not trying to bend my wrist too much-

(http://i.imgur.com/iFGwq2v.jpg)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: SiegeFrog on March 15, 2016, 06:02:36 am
To me anyway, of the three pictures you posted, this one (picture 2)  looks closest to the way that I play the D chord. Your wrist is straighter and your fingers are bent at all three joints. Your 2nd finger is not fretting on the nail. True, your thumb is not where Justin suggests, but everything else looks about right. Realize that by the time you finish the BC everyone (Justin included) is going to expect you to be playing your D chord with your thumb over the top muting the low E string anyway. Maybe you'll just be there a little early.

Also, don't overstress about touching the neck with you palm. I know that when I started I heard Justin say that the palm shouldn't touch the neck. Somehow, I understood that to mean the palm should be as far away from the neck as possible. You seem to be thinking the same. Exaggerating the distance between the palm and neck leads to an extreme wrist angle and possible injury. You're better off keeping your wrist straight and getting your hand closer to the neck. Think as close as you need to without touching; not as far away as possible.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Shaolindelt on March 15, 2016, 10:38:29 pm
+1 on the palm not being a big point.  I had some issues originally in muting the E string, but i got it sorted by pulling the palm back a bit.  But if the strings are ringing out ok I wouldn't worry about the palm.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: wukong on April 06, 2016, 09:09:32 pm
Hi,

I am new to this forum and I have a question on how to play D chord correctly.

To stretch 3rd finger enough, I find it is easier with the sequence 1st, 3rd and 2nd finger. Wonder whether it is fine or it will cause trouble in the future ...
Thanks
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: close2u on April 07, 2016, 08:48:14 am
@ wukong
Hello & welcome
 :)

Do you mean

e --- 1
B --- 3
G --- 2
D --- O
A --- x
E --- x

If so, un-learn that, it is going to make it more difficult for chord changes when you learn more chords.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: suzidownunder on April 07, 2016, 12:30:32 pm
Agree with Close2u your way sounds awkward...

Sent from my SM-N915G using Tapatalk

Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: tobyjenner on April 07, 2016, 01:19:52 pm
As Close says your fingering will make life harder. Index finger on the G/3rd string is come to both A and E for example and therefore stays put when changing from D to these chords or to D from them. If your playing D as Close depicts you'd have to lift all your fingers to change.  8)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: joueur de guitare on April 07, 2016, 01:57:22 pm
There's a very good reason you should play the chord the orthodox way.

Justin made a video ;)

http://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-114-AnchorFingers.php (http://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-114-AnchorFingers.php)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: wukong on April 07, 2016, 07:11:08 pm
@ wukong
Hello & welcome
 :)

Do you mean

e --- 1
B --- 3
G --- 2
D --- O
A --- x
E --- x

If so, un-learn that, it is going to make it more difficult for chord changes when you learn more chords.

Thanks for help.
No, I do not change the fingers position. It is still
e --- 2
B --- 3
G --- 1
D --- O
A --- x
E --- x

As Justin showed in the video, he put 1st finger on string G, then 2nd finger on string e, then 3rd finger on string B. But it is easier for me to put 1st finger on string G, then 3rd finger on string B, then 2nd finger on string e. In this way, I can stretch my 3rd finger enough close to the fret. Wonder if it matters ...

Sorry for my poor English, and hopefully I make it clear. Thanks

Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: joueur de guitare on April 07, 2016, 07:23:29 pm


As Justin showed in the video, he put 1st finger on string G, then 2nd finger on string e, then 3rd finger on string B. But it is easier for me to put 1st finger on string G, then 3rd finger on string B, then 2nd finger on string e. In this way, I can stretch my 3rd finger enough close to the fret. Wonder if it matters ...

Sorry for my poor English, and hopefully I make it clear. Thanks

Yeah, that's clear enough  :)

The order that you put your fingers down doesn't matter too much

Eventually you'll be aiming to put all your fingers down at once. See here

http://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-153-AirChanges.php (http://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-153-AirChanges.php)

But don't worry about that at the moment, it's way ahead of where you are now. Concentrate more on getting the changes smooth and clean
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Nocturnal1961 on April 11, 2016, 08:36:58 pm
Ok been trying to do D chord on Classical I have and BF is also letting me use his Shekter but we are looking for me a practice amp. I do have sore fingers so strumming has not gone for no 5 minutes. I will not move to next chord till I can do this but have a feeling I won't master it for 5 minutes till my finger tips get toughen up. As long as I try this several times a day and for as long as I can stand it it may add up to 5 or more minutes of practice but not 5 minutes continuously.  I won't give up yet.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Rossco01 on April 11, 2016, 10:14:00 pm
Well done and dont give up. 10-15 mins a day is all you need to start with.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: tobyjenner on April 11, 2016, 11:37:59 pm
Hey Nocturnal told you there'd be hope !

Now you've got that D shape and are building your fingers up, start looking at the fingering for the A chord as well. Shouldn't take long to pick that up. Then once your happy with the positions for D and A try the E.
Doesn't matter if its just a few minutes on each, just learn those new shape and progress onto those one minute changes. Before you know it you'll be playing those songs.  :) :)

Toby
 8)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: wukong on April 12, 2016, 02:22:39 am
Yeah, that's clear enough  :)

The order that you put your fingers down doesn't matter too much


Thank you very much!
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Zedd on May 06, 2016, 04:16:21 am
My noob question is about the strum, do I strum BACK starting at the smallest string or is every strum started on the first open string in the D chord, so strum downwards lift back up w/o touching the strings then strum downward again?
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: joueur de guitare on May 06, 2016, 05:29:29 am
My noob question is about the strum, do I strum BACK starting at the smallest string or is every strum started on the first open string in the D chord, so strum downwards lift back up w/o touching the strings then strum downward again?

All down strums

The first strumming pattern Justin teaches is RUST 1 - four down strums to the bar

See Lesson BC-116  http://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-116-Basic44time.php (http://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-116-Basic44time.php) Ignore the chord he's actually playing, it's a E, but the captioning calls it a D ;)

Later patterns introduce up strums, but you don't need to worry about them right now :)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Zedd on May 07, 2016, 01:20:30 am
All down strums, got it thanks!
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: nmego12345 on June 17, 2016, 05:07:37 pm
I played the D chord very easily at first, but I had to study for the exams so I took a rest for a month or two.
Now I can't play the D chord at all, no matter how hard I try, no matter how slow I play.
I get my fingers as close to the frets as possible without touching them.

I can't press hard on my three fingers  and not touch the E string with my third finger at the same time.
No matter how hard I try I can't do this, I can only concentrate on two fingers at once.

If I don't press the hardest, the strings give a bad sound.

I'm arranging my fingers like this: 1st finger on the third string (from below), 2nd finger on the first string (from below) (E), 3rd finger on the second string

Replacing the 1st and the second finger is easier for me, Can I do this? Or It will make switching chords later harder?

I don't know what to do on the D chord, I never do it right, the strings are simply too hard, I don't want to practise things wrong, what should I do?

Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Rossco01 on June 17, 2016, 06:00:01 pm
Sounds like your holding your fingers too flat. Try curving your hand over more and arching your fingers.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: nmego12345 on June 26, 2016, 06:56:30 pm
@Rossco Well that helped a lot, I finally managed to pull it off
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: auburntsts on June 29, 2016, 01:13:13 am
So I'm on day 2 trying to get my fingers to cooperate and apparently my fretting hand is made from a single block of wood. ;)  It seemed no matter what I did my ring finger kept muting the high E.  My wrist started hurting and I realized posture wise I was doing everything Justin says not to like tilting the guitar and leaning over the neck to try and see my fingers.  I was just about to call it a session, resigned to slog it out with the realization that it was going to take time.  Then I remembered the advice in one of Justin's videos (don't recall which one) and also posted here in the forum: get a mirror.  I wasn't optimistic that watching myself would really do any good.  I couldn't have been more wrong.  In 30 seconds I had my D chord ringing out clear!  I was able to relax my wrist, curl my fingers and get proper placement on the fretboard all while maintaining good posture -- simply because I could clearly see my freak'n fingers!! While a mirror is by no means a panacea, if you're having trouble and  haven't tried it, give it shot.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Ytfcwomble on July 18, 2016, 10:00:41 am
I am struggling big time with the D chord.
I read somewhere that the Dsus chord is just as good for begginers . Is this true ?
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Drubbing on July 18, 2016, 10:07:26 am
D sus what 2 or 4?

Longer answer, no. D is one of the most basic first chords. You have to learn the basic chords and not versions of them that can't replace them.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: hilts17 on July 18, 2016, 11:34:09 am
I agree with Drubbing. Learn the D chord. Are you in Stage 1 of Justin's Beginner Course? When I started, I too struggled right away with the D chord. I was discouraged but guess what? I stuck with it and got it. Just like I have with every chord. It takes practice and I mean, regular, every day practice. Tons of songs use a D chord. You will need it, so learn it.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: hilts17 on July 18, 2016, 11:36:33 am
I read somewhere that the Dsus was just as good
To use for begginers i am also struggling with this one

No it is not. I responded to your same question in your other thread but will do so again here.

When I started, I too struggled right away with the D chord. I was discouraged but guess what? I stuck with it and got it. Just like I have with every chord. It takes practice and I mean, regular, every day practice. Tons of songs use a D chord. You will need it, so learn it.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Andrea on July 18, 2016, 04:30:39 pm
Its normal to struggle in the beginning. Keep going. Pay attention to what Justin says about how to manipulate your fingers and your hand. Look at pictures of guitar players hands holding the D chord then make sure you are doing the same. You will become more aware of the details as you progress and just keep following his practice routine as outlined. Its a great routine that pays great dividends. You may not get it all right instantly but you will get it all right in the end if you persist on a daily basis for just a few minutes.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Joerfe on July 18, 2016, 05:37:18 pm
No excuses for not learning any of the chords in the beginners course. They will all feel hard to do because you are developing new motor skills.
But all the chords are relevant so just hang in there and get them well programmed in your fingers.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: 12-string_Doug on July 18, 2016, 07:44:19 pm
I read somewhere that the Dsus was just as good
To use for begginers
  "D is D, and Dsus is Dsus."  ;)
  And to expand on what Hilts wrote, remember there's a Dsus2 and Dsus4, both fingered differently. They also sound enough different from a "standard D" that either or sometimes both chords might get used in certain songs. (E.g., some versions of Dylan's "Mr. Tambourine Man." Some parts of it have all three, and you can hear the difference.)
  Stick with it, and some day it'll be "second nature" to you.  :)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: ajc24 on July 18, 2016, 10:09:24 pm
I read somewhere that the Dsus was just as good
To use for begginers i am also struggling with this one
Please don't listen to that advice :)

Even as a Stage 2 Beginners Course player - I, too, struggled horribly with the D chord in my early days. It took me ages and ages to get it right. So much so that I actually quit over it a few years back (mentally, I wasn't in a good place and just got too frustrated with trying it). I'm back at it now again (in a much happier place, too, I might add) and, after just 2 weeks practice with 1 minute changes and picking chord sequences / songs that especially included those trickier changes with the D that I couldn't get before (along with a metronome at 60bpm), I finally got it good enough in all cases that I could move on to Stage 2.

Slow yourself down. Get your metronome out to maintain your consistency with your strumming. Take it easy. Relax. Practice to Justins Stage 1 schedule. The D chord will come.

Honestly, it will.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: tobyjenner on July 18, 2016, 10:25:57 pm
No it is not. I responded to your same question in your other thread but will do so again here.

When I started, I too struggled right away with the D chord. I was discouraged but guess what? I stuck with it and got it. Just like I have with every chord. It takes practice and I mean, regular, every day practice. Tons of songs use a D chord. You will need it, so learn it.

Hilts is spot on, you will certainly need this chord AND its associated sus chords. Yes its hard to start with but there are never any shortcuts on this journey, only practice practice and then more practice for anything and everything you will learn, so stick with it.  8)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: tobyjenner on July 18, 2016, 10:30:24 pm
Mmm deja vu but +1 to the above three comments. Practice slow and carefully it will come. But it would be helpful if you could elaborate on the problems you are having with the D, then folks maybe able to see why you're struggling.  8)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Laila on July 19, 2016, 07:08:20 am
I struggle a bit with the D and Dm too, and figured out that I have trouble controlling my ring finger separately from the middle finger. I think that's normal, in everyday life you never need to. It's easier if I place the ring finger first, hold it still, then place the others. At some point I'll have to be able to put them all down at once, but it takes time to develop dexterity and in the meantime this helps.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: ajc24 on July 19, 2016, 08:46:54 am
I struggle a bit with the D and Dm too, and figured out that I have trouble controlling my ring finger separately from the middle finger.
This is definitely something I can agree with when it comes to D and Dm. I've already posted elsewhere about my difficulties with changing between Dm and A - because the ring finger is used as an anchor finger and slides from the 2nd string on the 2nd fret to the same string on the 3rd fret. And it's just an immovable and/or clumsy object at the moment. It won't slide nice and easily as I simply haven't developed the muscle control that I need to have with it yet.

As with everything else (it seems), practice practice and more practice!  ;D
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Rossco01 on July 19, 2016, 01:09:10 pm
Lots and lots and lots of practice! wait until you start using your little finger then the fun really begins.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: joueur de guitare on July 19, 2016, 03:30:56 pm
This is definitely something I can agree with when it comes to D and Dm. I've already posted elsewhere about my difficulties with changing between Dm and A - because the ring finger is used as an anchor finger and slides from the 2nd string on the 2nd fret to the same string on the 3rd fret. And it's just an immovable and/or clumsy object at the moment. It won't slide nice and easily as I simply haven't developed the muscle control that I need to have with it yet.

As with everything else (it seems), practice practice and more practice!  ;D

And patience, patience, patience.

Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Mphs-Mike on August 06, 2016, 11:39:27 pm
From reading other posts, I'm having the same common beginner issues with the D chord as others have had and look forward to the day when it consistently rings correctly.  Practice, Practice, Practice.

Should I continue to practice the D chord while moving on to the next lesson, or should I wait until I feel comfortable that I've got the D chord mastered before moving on?

Thanks
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: rusty0412 on December 15, 2016, 05:31:06 pm
From reading other posts, I'm having the same common beginner issues with the D chord as others have had and look forward to the day when it consistently rings correctly.  Practice, Practice, Practice.

Should I continue to practice the D chord while moving on to the next lesson, or should I wait until I feel comfortable that I've got the D chord mastered before moving on?

Thanks

I am also wondering how good should I be at the D chord before moving on? Should I be able to play it perfectly 100% of the time? Should I be able to play it without looking at the fret board and my fingers before moving on?
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: joueur de guitare on December 15, 2016, 05:48:48 pm
I am also wondering how good should I be at the D chord before moving on? Should I be able to play it perfectly 100% of the time? Should I be able to play it without looking at the fret board and my fingers before moving on?

Justin says.

Quote
• You should know all the chords from this stage, D, A and E, from memory.
• You should have them sounding good (if not perfect), with most of the notes sounding out most of the time.
• You should have your One-Minute changes to at least 40 changes in a minute (20 x the pair of changes).
• You should be able to play one or two of the songs from the songbook, even if you have to start and stop a little bit here and there.

http://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-119-PRACTICEstage1.php (http://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-119-PRACTICEstage1.php)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: UmnyeniKH on December 29, 2016, 12:55:13 pm
So I am on my second day of practicing the D chord doing roughly 15-20 minutes of practice a day per guidance. I've gotten it to sound solid a few times but my biggest problem comes with the 5th string (B). It still too often sounds like a dud. I've watched the video a few times and my finger isn't high on the fret nor from what I can tell is any other finger touching it. It's possible my index finger is laying on it but from my viewpoint, it doesn't seem so.

Any other common mistakes it sounds like I am making?

Thank you.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: close2u on December 29, 2016, 01:00:58 pm
@ UmnyeniKH
Hello and welcome to the Beginners Course and forum too.  :)

my biggest problem comes with the 5th string (B).

Usually, thick E is called 6th, A is called 5th etc so the B string is called 2nd and the thin E is called 1st.

Quote
It still too often sounds like a dud ... It's possible my index finger is laying on it but from my viewpoint, it doesn't seem so.

If your index finger is touching the B string it should not be affecting the sound as your index finger is behind (further away from the guitar body) the third finger at fret 3 of the B string.
Have you tried playing the single B string on its own with your finger in position ... no other fingers on the fretboard?
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: UmnyeniKH on December 29, 2016, 01:08:43 pm
Thank you for the welcome!

Ah, yes. I thought I noticed Justin say that in the D chord video. The first string is the bottom and the sixth is the top? I'll have to reverse my labels! :)

I have tried to single it out and it sounded fine. Well, what my untrained ears perceived to sound fine. It rang out like I believe that it should.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: joueur de guitare on December 29, 2016, 01:13:28 pm
@ UmnyeniKH

Needs more practice. You're only 2 days in :)

Make sure your finger is close to the fret, and is fairly upright. Your index finger fretting the 3rd string is behind your ring finger which is fretting the 2nd string so shouldn't make any difference. It's good practice to keep your fingers clear of other strings though.


(https://www.justinguitar.com/images/BC_images/Justin_Chord_Photos/D.jpg)



Are you practising all three chords in Stage 1? And the 1 minute changes?

This schedule below is what you should be doing with your 20 minutes, not playing just the one chord.

https://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-119-PRACTICEstage1.php (https://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-119-PRACTICEstage1.php)

The B string is usually referred to as the second string BTW. Count up, not down.  ;)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: GeraltDieSocke on January 06, 2017, 04:09:14 pm
Hi guys,

there was a time 1 year ago where I took that beginner course and rushed too it way to fast and stopped at barree. So I could play the chords but not in a good sounding way.

Now 1 year later I have decided to go all over it again but then just go to next stage when the learned chords are perfectly playable and I can change through them at least once per second perfectly.

I have no problems with E and A whatsoever but I'm sturgglin with the D Chord. When I strum, pick, strum it it's always perfect. But the change from E or from A are not that perfect.
The problem is that I switch to D with the index and then put middle finger and then ring finger on it. That costs time.
On A and E I slide with the index finger and put down middle and ring at the same time.

I practiced it now for 1 and a half week or so for 1 hour a day but it seems that it gets worse then better with the D chord. I remember that I head the same problem with D 1 year ago.

Also I don't know how to place the thumb correctly on the back of the guitar. On A and E the thumb looks over the guitar neck so it's easier to hold it otherwise muscle hurts very much. But to bring the D to sound good I have to completely change thumb position for it. That also costs time and in my feeling precision.
I know it's hard to see what I mean but maybe I could come up with a little video if you want. I have the feeling that I'm doing it wrong.

I also practice the as following since 3 days:

I play a perfect D chord. Then lift of the hand holding the position for D chord. Rest it for a few secs on my foot and then put it on so all fingers hit the sites at once. Maybe that will help me to get D faster. I'm also do the 1 minute changes A to D and E to D. I can make 60 changes a min but it's everything other then good sounding and perfect. Also the fact that I have to be focused that I just hit 4 sites for D. So much little things where I have to focus on :D

I just want to play this 3 chords perfectly before I move on to Am, Em and Dm.

Thank you guys. I'm just afraid to learn something bad and it gets burned into my brain.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: jakecool23 on January 06, 2017, 06:16:52 pm
i had the same problem when I started 2 weeks ago but a guy sent me this video and the next day I was able to play the D chord good.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=TSrfB7JIzxY
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: batwoman on January 06, 2017, 10:46:15 pm
Thanks Jake, this is really useful. Your first good vibe to you  8)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: justinguitar on January 07, 2017, 12:27:14 pm
Interesting, not seen this vid before - will check with my mrs about this, she's an Osteopath and should give me some good tips on how to best stretch out the hand! :)

Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: sdd56 on January 07, 2017, 03:02:59 pm
I found that stretching video a few months ago, just after I first started. It certainly seems to have helped me - initially there was no way I could stretch to a C chord. Now it's quite comfortable.

If I splay both hands out, the spread of my left hand is now significantly wider than the right, especially between fingers 2 & 3.

But I don't think it will help the OP with the D chord as it's not a big stretch. I think the answer to that is just more practise!
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: simon3142 on January 07, 2017, 04:07:27 pm
You say you have to completely change you thumb position when changing to the D chord suggests a possible issue you may have.

In order form chords cleanly you need to be able get your fingers down straight onto the stings, to do this you need to be able to flex the distal joints of you fingers. I wonder if you are not doing this so when you go from A or E to D you have to move your thumb to a completely new position in order to make the chord clean.


Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: SiegeFrog on January 07, 2017, 04:41:00 pm
I'm reticent to respond as I'm neither a doctor or physical therapist, but I'm weary of some of the stretches in Carl Brown's video. When I first started a couple of years ago I found that video and installed the stretches into my practice routine. A year into my journey, I developed trigger finger and wrist pain that sent me to the doctor. During my treatment, I showed these stretches to my PT. She was very concerned about any of the stretches that extended a joint past its normal range of motion. She instructed me to stop doing them. She did not say that the exercises caused my problems, just that they could be hazardous to the joints in general.


Sent from my iPhone using JustinGuitar Community mobile app (http://r.tapatalk.com/byo?rid=93296)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Laila on January 07, 2017, 06:01:33 pm
I found the video very interesting, thanks Jake. I recognise some of the all-finger stretches from climbing. They are very useful, but have to be used with care, as it's easy to pull too hard. I like the idea of gentle stretching as part of a warm-up routine, to get the fingers warm and agile.

Sent fra min C6903 via Tapatalk

Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Dr Winterbourne on January 07, 2017, 08:47:34 pm
At stage one, part of the idea is to exercise the mound of Venus area, between thumb and first finger. As OP noted, this area is painful for him, so he avoids using his thumb on the back of the neck. I love a saucy thumb, looped over the top to mute the bass strings,  but stage one isn't about learning all the useful tricks - part of it is readying your hand for what comes later. OP, slow down, rewatching the videos, and do the chords as suggested. Your hand hurts because it is being forced to exercise a muscle that has not been exercised enough. Keep!the thumb on the neck and just follow the lessons. I reckon.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: GeraltDieSocke on January 07, 2017, 10:20:06 pm
Thank you for all your help.
I watched the video and I don't know if that is something I want to spend my time on. But the problem with the D is not the stretching, it's because I put my index finger on and then the middle finger and then the ring finger. It should go all fingers at once like I can do it with A and E.

How shoul I place my thumb correctly? I watched the videos but I still don't know how exactly. The most comfortable way is to have the thumb look over the neck a bit but the chord change is easier when the thumb is behind the neck but it hurts. So it's just a thing of more practice to train the muscle? It will get better?

Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: MCosta84 on January 08, 2017, 03:29:58 am
I am 5 months in and on stage 5 and my D chord still does not go down all at once. It's one of the longer ones to train. To me your progress sounds normal.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: jakecool23 on January 08, 2017, 06:15:33 am
SiegeFrog
in the video he does say that it can be bad if done wrong u know I'd just slowly do it just remember in the video he said he has been doing it for a long time so he has got use to doing the exercises.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: simon3142 on January 08, 2017, 12:17:19 pm
This is a bit confusing as the thread had been inserted into another thread but replying to the OP who had  to completely alter their had position  when changing from E or A to D.

You seem to like playing the E and A with the thumb hanging off the neck. You should be able to play the D with the thumb there as well.

Try this: Form an E chord, then keep the hand and thumb where they are and take all the finger right off the fret board. Then without moving the thumb or hand, put the tip of the second finger the second fret of the high E string where it needs to be for the D chord.

You should find that you have to curl the finger quite sharply to do this. then put fingers 1 and 3 down in position for the D chord. The base of your fingers will be very close to the side of the neck.

The image shows the thumb peeping round the neck and the second finger quite tightly curled up
https://www.justinguitar.com/images/BC_images/Justin_Chord_Photos/D.jpg (https://www.justinguitar.com/images/BC_images/Justin_Chord_Photos/D.jpg)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Tom Marinan on January 01, 2018, 05:58:07 pm
I have been playing the guitar very badly for many years but have not made much progress so decided to start from scratch. When doing the D chord I have always used a bar across the 4th and 6th string instead of using 1st and 3rd finger. Is this acceptable or is it going to cause problems as I can still use the anchor method to change to A a
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: stitch101 on January 01, 2018, 06:17:51 pm
Welcome to the forum.
It will cause problems when playing the Dsus2. A very common embellishment is D, Dsus2, D sus4.
On the other hand playing the D with a mini barre handy when playing the blues. So both have they're
place learn both.
Also this is a lesson specific question and should be posted in that lessons sub form.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: ajc24 on January 28, 2018, 09:59:13 pm
I am 5 months in and on stage 5 and my D chord still does not go down all at once. It's one of the longer ones to train. To me your progress sounds normal.

I'm somewhat relieved to hear of others who have the same issues as I do with D. It's one of the first chords just about every beginners course will tell you to learn (including Justin) and, for me, it has proven to be one of the hardest.

I've kept practicing it over and over and over again and still can't quite grasp it (but am getting really close). What I found helped me immensely was to practice changing to it from chords with no anchor fingers (Em to D and Am to D, for example). By doing this I got used to having to create the shape and put down my fingers quickly enough pretty much from scratch each time.

Reaping the rewards of that now (even if it has taken 6 weeks of solid practice to get it "reasonable" and still not "perfect"). I'm now gaining confidence in my changes to D instead of them being ultra slow and very clunky.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: WillCornwall on February 07, 2018, 01:34:05 pm
I'm beginning and just about got the D, A & E cords right but I have a question specifically about finding the finger positions when the guitar is first picked-up.

I am trying to hold the guitar as advised and also not look at the frets to get the fingering positions.  Is there a way to learn how to get the corre ct positions for example chord D without looking or does it just come with practice (eventually)?.
Bill.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: joueur de guitare on February 07, 2018, 01:45:51 pm
I'm beginning and just about got the D, A & E cords right but I have a question specifically about finding the finger positions when the guitar is first picked-up.

I am trying to hold the guitar as advised and also not look at the frets to get the fingering positions.  Is there a way to learn how to get the corre ct positions for example chord D without looking or does it just come with practice (eventually)?.
Bill.

Hello and welcome.

You're a beginner, you can't shape chords without looking. You're trying to move your fingers into unnatural shapes, and so it's not intuitive.

Do the chord practice - pick the strings/strum/pick the strings. Read the lesson, don't just watch the vid. https://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-111-D-chord.php (https://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-111-D-chord.php) . Do the one minute changes. Do that every day. Play songs - Three Little Birds. Start slow.

Saying that, watch your posture, and try not to look over the fret board. Don't angle the fret board towards the ceiling either though.

Eventually you'll do it without looking, but that will take time, and practice :)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: WillCornwall on February 07, 2018, 02:15:28 pm
Many thanks.  I guess with practice my fingers will gradually find the correct position and shape with less initial looking.
Bill.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: hilts17 on February 07, 2018, 02:25:43 pm
Many thanks.  I guess with practice my fingers will gradually find the correct position and shape with less initial looking.
Bill.

I guarantee that will be case indeed. Practice and patience are key.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: zedhead on February 07, 2018, 08:16:38 pm
I had trouble with both the D and the C chord in that my fingers wouldn't go down as one unit. The C chord was the worst as I couldn't stop "walking my fingers" . It was driving me mad but I then started to do extra air changes and the results were incredible. Still not perfect all the time but much better, unfortunately its just practice, practice, practice.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Daddio on March 23, 2018, 05:08:39 pm
It seems more comfortable to reverse fingers 1 and 2 when forming a D chord.  Is this okay, or should I force myself to form a D chord using the fingering in the lesson?  I'm just worried that doing it differently may cause a problem later.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: close2u on March 23, 2018, 09:27:50 pm
It will cause a problem later so train them fingers  8)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Johno1979uk on June 29, 2018, 01:07:07 pm
Oh man!!! My fingers!! Only been playing three days so a total beginner. Late starter at 39. I'd say I'm hitting the D chord 10% of the time. The rest is buzzy and clinky. AARRRGGHH. My ring finger seems to want to do it's own thing.

Good to see I am not the only one on here having the same problems. This will take years I think. But years I have!!
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: DavidP on June 29, 2018, 01:20:35 pm
Oh man!!! My fingers!! Only been playing three days so a total beginner. Late starter at 39. I'd say I'm hitting the D chord 10% of the time. The rest is buzzy and clinky. AARRRGGHH. My ring finger seems to want to do it's own thing.

Good to see I am not the only one on here having the same problems. This will take years I think. But years I have!!
Welcome to the Community, Johno.

Those first few days and weeks are the same for everybody ... so much to learn and act upon.  The knowledge about the guitar and how to make chords. The need to develop the manual dexterity to put the fingers in the correct place.  The need to toughen up those finger-tips.

If you find that it takes a lot of force to hold down the strings to get a clean chord then maybe your guitar needs to be setup.  It takes some force but often learners press much harder than necessary.  Sure Justin talks about using just enough pressure. 

But the good news is that with a short and regular attention, you should make good progress reasonably quickly.  10-15 mins/day and very quickly you'll have suitably calloused finger-tips.

Enjoy the journey !!
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: davidison#02 on July 05, 2018, 07:49:54 pm
Hi everyone, hope you all enjoying the or evening.

I'm a beginner and finding this guitar thing really hard at the moment.

mostly holding the cords but im on the  A cord at the moment. Which im really finding it hard to  hold, the show must go on as they say .

soon I'm going to stick with it.

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Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: jono on July 05, 2018, 10:43:24 pm
It does seem almost impossible when first starting.  Acoustic or electric?


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Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: KevinH on July 12, 2018, 06:05:19 pm
Been playing for about 3 weeks.

When I change to the D chord, I can't move my 2 and 3 fingers simultaneously. I have to place 2 first and then 3, no matter how many time I try. With A and E chord changes, I can place all three fingers at once (well, 1 is already there, since it's the anchor, but I can press the strings with my 2 and 3 fingers simultaneously) but need two steps to get a D chord.

This makes my chord changes to D much slower than to A or E.

I'm assuming it's because the 2 and 3 finger positions are kinda swapped for D. Meaning that for A and E, the 2 finger is above the 3 finger but for D, 3 is above 2.

Any advice for getting better changing to D other than keep doing one-minute chord changes until I go all Bryan Adams (i.e. fingers bleeding)?
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: joueur de guitare on July 12, 2018, 06:13:25 pm

Any advice?

Patience.

You'll get there. :)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Caulfield on August 19, 2018, 12:21:11 am
I'm really struggling to apply enough pressure with my second finger on the first string. The guy at the shop said the guitar had a low enough action for beginners.

I've got my finger close to the fret, and my third finger isn't touching the first string. I trimmed my fingernails. I guess maybe it's a strength thing, but is there a way I can adjust the angle of my grip or something?
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: stitch101 on August 19, 2018, 01:57:29 am
Put a capo on the first fret and then try to play a D chord in relation to the capo.
If it is a lot easier to play the D the your nut may be to high. If it's just a little
easier the you need to work on your finger strength.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Caulfield on August 19, 2018, 08:03:26 pm
I don't have a capo, but if I keep struggling I'll get one and try that test, thanks.

I felt like I was getting it late last night and early this morning, then when I sat down for my 30 minutes of practice today, it was like starting over and I felt like I made no progress.

I feel like one finger a half a millimeter off ruins everything, and I don't know how guitar players do it, even with muscle memory. Do the calluses that form help with playing, as well as preventing soreness?
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: KevinH on August 19, 2018, 09:27:21 pm
I don't have a capo, but if I keep struggling I'll get one and try that test, thanks.

I felt like I was getting it late last night and early this morning, then when I sat down for my 30 minutes of practice today, it was like starting over and I felt like I made no progress.

I feel like one finger a half a millimeter off ruins everything, and I don't know how guitar players do it, even with muscle memory. Do the calluses that form help with playing, as well as preventing soreness?

I'm about a month ahead of you and will tell you that it absolutely gets better and easier.

A month ago, I couldn't play an open A chord.  I struggled with D as well.  Today, I can nail them consistently and even play songs like Three Little Birds without missing a chord.  A, D, and E are my go-to chords now and I'm fairly good at switching between them with the beat. 

Yes, the calluses that form help a TON.  5 min of practice used to be as much as I can handle.  Now, I can play for 30 min + easily.

I've recently progressed to the C and G.  THOSE were frustrating.  In fact, I posted in the G Chord message board a week ago that I can't even get close to playing it correctly.  A week later and, not only am I playing it correctly, but I'm up to 40 C-to-G chord changes a minute and playing Hey Joe (C, G, A, D, and Emin chords) well enough that it's somewhat recognizable.

Keep at it.  What seems impossible today will be second nature eventually.   

EDITED:  Last thing:  Follow Justin's practice routine!  I didn't want to do my 1-minute chord changes but I did them...and they work.  Justin knows what he's doing.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: wajeeh on December 02, 2018, 08:42:49 am
Is it okay to do like one minute practice in the beginning rather than the 5 minute continuous thing mention by Justin? My fingers kind of really hurt
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: close2u on December 02, 2018, 09:32:57 am
@ wajeeh

Yes. Do 1 minute. Take a break. Repeat after a short time.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: alien51 on December 16, 2018, 09:07:06 pm
Is not pressing the high e hard enough a common thing? I can play it properly at times but, after a bit of pressing down my finger starts to indent and hurt then it starts to sounds like a buzz until I can press it the right way.
This is only my second day practicing.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: stitch101 on December 16, 2018, 09:36:19 pm
Your fingertips are still soft so will get dents in them when playing.
Keep at it your fingers will get calluses. 
Another thing that will help is having your guitar set up properly.
Are you playing an electric or acoustic?
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: noobfromtheinternet on December 17, 2018, 08:56:13 am
Is not pressing the high e hard enough a common thing? I can play it properly at times but, after a bit of pressing down my finger starts to indent and hurt then it starts to sounds like a buzz until I can press it the right way.
This is only my second day practicing.
Short answer, yes. Until your fingers toughen up that high E string will feel like razor wire.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: alien51 on December 19, 2018, 01:18:39 am
Your fingertips are still soft so will get dents in them when playing.
Keep at it your fingers will get calluses. 
Another thing that will help is having your guitar set up properly.
Are you playing an electric or acoustic?

It's an electric guitar. It hasn't been setup when I bought it. Though, it says it has been by the shot sometime around July.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: AChris30 on December 27, 2018, 09:57:55 am
Hello,
I am far beyond stage 1 and found out that I maybe got myself into a bad habit because I tend to play D like this

https://imgur.com/a/UDSZBom

I guess I got into this because it allowed me to get finger 1 closer to the fret and required less power in finger 1 at the beginning. Now in stage 4 I think I am struggeling because it is to slow to get out of it and into the next chord.
What should I do?
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: tobyjenner on December 27, 2018, 10:07:07 am
Chris

Refer to my response to your App v Website post. You're fingering looks ok to me unless I'm missing something. As often said practice make permanent, so at Stage 4 its not too late to correct any bad habits you may have developed and it will pay dividends in the future.

Again hope this helps.

Toby
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: DavidP on December 27, 2018, 10:19:39 am
Chris, I agree with Toby ie D fingering looks standard. How are you going with One Minute Changes? If changes involving D are slow then concentrate OMC drills like C-D, G-D. Relax, persevere and changes will become more fluent then increase in speed over time. Speaking of time, as a matter of interest, how long since you started up?
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: AChris30 on December 27, 2018, 11:57:20 am
Hi Toby and David,
so you don't think my finger 1 and 2 should be curved like in Justins videos and it is ok that they are straight? I'm on at least 30 on every one minute change and on over 40 on most of them. D is not so special on one minute changes but I have problems on songs where there is an upstrum on the last count and I have to change away from D to some other chord in time for the next downstrum on 1.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: DavidP on December 27, 2018, 01:46:04 pm
Hi Toby and David,
so you don't think my finger 1 and 2 should be curved like in Justins videos and it is ok that they are straight? I'm on at least 30 on every one minute change and on over 40 on most of them. D is not so special on one minute changes but I have problems on songs where there is an upstrum on the last count and I have to change away from D to some other chord in time for the next downstrum on 1.

Chris, if I use Justin's learning structure as a guide then stage 3 is when an upstrum is added and it is on beat 3.  A second pattern with upstrums is introduced in stage 4, which adds up strums on the & in beat 3 and 4.  So in theory by the time you start having to deal with an upstrum as you are changing chords you would have done a little more practice, more changes, some new chords.

The other thing is that in that lesson I am sure Justin points out that often the up strum on the & of beat 4 catches open strings as the change to the next chord is already in progress.  This may sound odd when playing at a low tempo but once the tempo picks up you won't notice it at all.

So I wouldn't worry too much at this stage.  All sounds quite reasonable.  While you are working on those new chords in stage 4 I suggest you continue to work on learning songs from stages 1-3, getting it smooth at low tempos and working up speed.  And as you do this you'll inevitably get faster, build those OMC counts up towards 60 when changing between chords from the first 3 stages.  And the feel for making changes with an upstrum on the & of beat 4 will come.  It's hard to explain ... keep plugging away and in due course what feels mechanical and stiff will suddenly start to sound fluent and relaxed.

Maybe also post some videos of you playing (can't recall seeing posts from you) ... you'll get feedback and encouragement that way.  Invaluable IMHO

Keep rocking and rolling ...
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: AChris30 on December 30, 2018, 11:07:56 am
Chris, if I use Justin's learning structure as a guide then stage 3 is when an upstrum is added and it is on beat 3.  A second pattern with upstrums is introduced in stage 4, which adds up strums on the & in beat 3 and 4.  So in theory by the time you start having to deal with an upstrum as you are changing chords you would have done a little more practice, more changes, some new chords.

The other thing is that in that lesson I am sure Justin points out that often the up strum on the & of beat 4 catches open strings as the change to the next chord is already in progress.  This may sound odd when playing at a low tempo but once the tempo picks up you won't notice it at all.

I am in fact at the end of stage 4 now but my problem mostly happens when I have to change from D to another chord so I put it here because I wondered if my hand position on D is wrong. The open upstrum didn't go into my brain right now and as you wrote, it is odd when you practise it slowly (and you shouldn't do that I think). I'll try to train D to anything for a while and hope it gets better.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: DavidP on December 30, 2018, 01:01:22 pm
I am in fact at the end of stage 4 now but my problem mostly happens when I have to change from D to another chord so I put it here because I wondered if my hand position on D is wrong. The open upstrum didn't go into my brain right now and as you wrote, it is odd when you practise it slowly (and you shouldn't do that I think). I'll try to train D to anything for a while and hope it gets better.

I'm sure it will Chris.  Just keep working those OMCs with a D and it will get better.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: tdewald on January 29, 2019, 06:32:15 pm
I'm having a really hard time with my fretting fingers touching the other strings.  I know this is common, but I seem to be having more trouble than most.  My brother-in-law is a long time guitar player, and when he handled my guitar he told me that he's not surprised because the neck is unusually narrow.

I got this guitar for free from a friend about 10 years ago.  It's a Fender Squire electric.  I have relatively large hands and fingers...  should I look into getting a new guitar, or would replacing the nut with a wider one be a realistic option?  It does look like the nut could be spaced a bit wider without causing issues, though the neck is pretty darn narrow, so the gains would not be much.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: turtleDonkey on February 04, 2019, 12:59:10 pm
The best thing to do is probably to go to a guitar shop and try a few other guitars to see how they feel and if you run into the same problem.
If you only have this issue with your guitar you could ask the guitar tech to check if there is anything wrong with it.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Holymoly on March 12, 2019, 09:46:21 am
Is there any reason why I shouldn't play an open D chord by barring the first to third strings then playing the second string with my second finger? It has always seemed a viable option for the larger fingered man.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Rossco01 on March 12, 2019, 10:34:04 am
Strictly speaking no reason not to do it like that (it'll sound the same) however probably easier to learn that shape at this point as it helps with other chords later on. It feels like a real pain when you start but soon gets easier after a few weeks.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: stitch101 on March 12, 2019, 03:30:16 pm
Is there any reason why I shouldn't play an open D chord by barring the first to third strings then playing the second string with my second finger? It has always seemed a viable option for the larger fingered man.

Yes there is. You won't  be able to play a Dsus2 one of the most used embellishments
used with the open D.
On the other hand it makes it easier to play D/F# with the F# on the D string.
Eventually you'll use both methods but the 3 finger D is more important when you're
starting out.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: close2u on March 12, 2019, 08:36:08 pm
Don't take that short cut as you'll lose out.
As already mentioned above … plus playing a D/F# with the F# on the low E string will be super difficult too.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: DaafdeRaaf on March 28, 2019, 01:13:25 pm
Lesson Link: http://justinguitar.com/en/BC-111-D-chord.php

Questions...
Hi Justin and the community!

Thank you, Justin, for all your great work on the site. I am a guitar rookie and I bought an electronic guitar a few days ago and received it yesterday. It's a Fazley E100 SB. I am currently at this section of your beginners course: D chord.

I am picking up fine, and I think I have the right group, but when I play the D chord, it sounds off... I have tuned my guitar with an electronic tuning device which gave green light on all strings, but it sounds weird nonetheless.

I made a video where you can hear it: https://youtu.be/AsFBAUfu2Uc

I also tried the following chord course, the A chord, and that one sounds fine.

I am hoping you or one of the community can help me out.

Kind regards,

D

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Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: DaafdeRaaf on March 28, 2019, 01:16:13 pm
*group = grip

Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: DaafdeRaaf on March 28, 2019, 02:14:33 pm
Hmmmm I just retried tuning again and now I noticed my tuner displays the wrong notes.... (E is shown as D for example). Googling around I see more people with the same issue. I am currently calling the shop where I bought everything, see if they an help.

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Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: KeepingAwake on March 28, 2019, 03:01:03 pm
DaafdeRaaf,

We can't see your video because you're too new to the forum to post links yet.

The tuner can only tell you what note the string is playing. It doesn't know what note you want it to be.  My guess would be that the guitar was quite out of tune and you didn't realize it. So you got the notes to green, but they're the wrong notes in some cases.

From the thickest string to the thinnest, the notes should be EADGBE. Hope that helps!
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: DaafdeRaaf on March 28, 2019, 05:24:23 pm
Yup, that was the issue! I fixed it now. Haha I got sweaty hands turning the strings tighter, afraid one would break. By now I know better. Learned a lot today which is great!

I made another video. The link is: https://youtu.be/RItpqzr7KRs which I hope you can see now or maybe another user can turn it into a direct video inside a post.

Thanks again for your reply.

Kind regards,

D

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Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: DaafdeRaaf on March 28, 2019, 05:26:03 pm

https://youtu.be/RItpqzr7KRs (https://youtu.be/RItpqzr7KRs). Testing this now.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: stitch101 on March 28, 2019, 05:46:27 pm
Your G string is still out of tune.
If your tuner says it in tone you may be pressing to hard and putting it out.
A big rookie mistake is to press way to hard on the strings.
You only need enough pressure to make the note ring out.

Music is the best you can give yourself.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: brianlarsen on March 28, 2019, 06:34:01 pm
Music is the best you can give yourself.
Amen!  ;D
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: stitch101 on March 28, 2019, 06:55:17 pm
Amen!  ;D

Just reread what I wrote and see I left out the word gift.
It was supposed to say
Music is the best gift you can give yourself  :)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: DaafdeRaaf on April 01, 2019, 07:38:50 am
Your G string is still out of tune.
If your tuner says it in tone you may be pressing to hard and putting it out.
A big rookie mistake is to press way to hard on the strings.
You only need enough pressure to make the note ring out.

Music is the best you can give yourself.
Thanks again! I retuned my guitar and it sounds better now!

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Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: arpitdjosh on April 10, 2019, 12:32:01 pm
Hi all,

Its been over a week now with the D chord ( never picked a guitar before) . While playing the chord I have to look down at the fingers, adjust a bit and then play. The adjustment time has certainly reduced but I cant  place the fingers at correct position as first go.
My question is when can I move onto the A chord. Should I be able to play the D chord without looking at the fingers ? And should I be able to place my fingers at correct location in one go ?
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: stitch101 on April 10, 2019, 04:26:53 pm
Welcome to the forum
You should learn all three chords together for a few reasons.
1 If you only play one chord you'll develop grooves in you fingers when your calluses
start forming.
2 You can get cramping in you finger repeating the same chord for to long.
3 You'll never learn chord changes with one chord.

What you experiencing is normal and not having to look at your fingers takes
a long time. Placing your fingers down all at once also comes with time.
Justin has a lesson later on called Air Changes that help.

Remember to have fun
Music is the best gift you can give yourself.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: arpitdjosh on April 12, 2019, 11:33:59 am
Oh thanks, so I should probably move on to the next chord then, that is , the A-chord.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: 95yj on April 21, 2019, 10:07:16 pm
I'm kind of stuck on the first lesson group because I cannot change to the D chord without mucking about.  I've been practicing for three weeks now on acoustic.  My issue is that I cannot form the D chord without placing my index finger on the G string, rotating to get my middle finger on the high E and then extending my ring finger onto the B string and this takes way too long.  I can get almost 50 changes in on A-D but E-D is down around 40 and the D chord starts falling apart and stops ringing out after a while.  If I slow down to make good D chords, then I'm down around 30.  Also, I cannot play along with any song because it takes too long to change to the D chord

The is no way for me to get my middle finger to the high E string if my index and ring finger are already on the G and B nor can I get my middle finger behind the ring finger if I try to make the chord shape without a guitar.  I took my middle finger to a 90 degree angle at the second joint about 20 years ago in a volleyball tournament; I don't know if this has anything to do with it.

Does anyone know any exercises that I can do without the guitar to get more flexibility in my middle finger so that I can do them all day instead of the 30-60 minutes of practice each day?

On another note, that might be the most annoying Captcha ever.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: ur3kMazino on April 21, 2019, 10:43:42 pm
Hmmmm I just retried tuning again and now I noticed my tuner displays the wrong notes.... (E is shown as D for example). Googling around I see more people with the same issue. I am currently calling the shop where I bought everything, see if they an help.

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Hmm sometimes when a string is tuned too high it will register as a higher note (ex: the E string was tuned too high it will register on a headstock tuner as a low tuned A string or sometimes a low tuned D string.)so if your E string registers as a higher string on your tuner try lowering the tune down until it registers as a correct string on the display.



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Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Tronome on August 19, 2019, 11:17:09 pm
Hi, at 6:37 it is mentioned that there is supposed to be a little gap between the index finger and the fret board. I would like to know the reasoning behind this and why it could be beneficial down the road.

I am sorry in case this question has been asked before, but a quick forum search didn't provide the answer I was looking for.
Thank you :)
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: stitch101 on August 20, 2019, 02:24:07 am
Welcome to the forum Tronome
The reason to keep the gap is so as a beginner you don't  mute the e string when
learning new chords.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Tronome on August 20, 2019, 10:09:42 am
Thanks. :) So if I am able to play every open chord without muting the e string, it is a non-issue.
Title: Fingering
Post by: Sapna on August 22, 2019, 11:17:05 pm
Try as much as I want, I just can't seem to play the D chord with the my ring finger. I've tried every contortion possible and the high E is always dead. HOWEVER, if I use my pinky instead of my ring finger, I can get a beautiful D chord.

Is there a disadvantage to playing the D chord with the pinky instead of the ring finger? With my pre-basic knowledge, I can't think why it would be problem since I have my anchoring finger right.

Thanks for your help
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: stitch101 on August 23, 2019, 02:29:15 am
You stated in your first post you'd like to play fingerstyle.
You will nee your pinky to play sus chords and to do hammer ons and pull offs
to play melodies when playing fingerstyle.

Make sure you're not muting the string with the meaty part of your finger.
Make sure you're using the tip of your finger.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Sapna on August 23, 2019, 04:42:52 am
Thanks - that's helpful to know.

I've tried contorting my hand and can't seem to not mute the high E with my ring finger. I'm trying to use my tip, but it's still spreading out. I'll keep at it.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: stitch101 on August 23, 2019, 04:53:11 am
You may have to develop calises so your finger tip doesn't flatten out.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: close2u on August 23, 2019, 08:35:03 am
Hi Sapna.
You really do, 100%, need to learn to play the D chord in the standard fingering.
For chord changes later down the line.
For playing additional embellishments around the D chord as stitch mentions ... Dsus4 etc.
You want your fingers to be standing slightly upright rather than laying flat.
It seems silly but I say to beginners make your fingers touch the neck like an alert or startled spider - standing up. Not like a hiding spider, pressed flat, laying down against a wall.
And callouses will help when your finger ends harden more they will splay out less and so interfere with adjacent strings less.
Title: Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
Post by: Fetch on August 23, 2019, 04:08:36 pm
Sapna,

You might also double check your middle finger positioning. It might be that while you're focused on your ring finger your middle finger is rolling over or sliding up to be on top of the fret rather than just behind it. This can sound like muting too.

If you have the opportunity, a picture can be helpful in this kind of situation so folks here can see your hand position and give more specific feedback.

Keep at it. You will get there.

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