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Site Lesson Specific Questions => Ear Training Lesson (ET) => Topic started by: justinguitar on July 14, 2008, 04:39:51 pm

Title: ET-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: justinguitar on July 14, 2008, 04:39:51 pm
Questions...

Lesson Link: http://justinguitar.com/en/ET-002-SongIntervals.php
Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: Lundis91 on October 12, 2008, 04:01:02 pm
Hey just thought you could have the Rush song "YYZ" as an example for descending tritone, it has a really characteristic intro riff :)
Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: Gplombar on August 13, 2009, 05:30:32 pm
Hi, can anyone tell what does a perfect 4Th means, or a perfect 5Th, please, I'm really confused whit this intervals thing, and also I'm not sure what does a Diminished 5Th Tritone Augmented 4Th, its so frustrating!! I just really hard for me to get it, or maybe someone can tell me where can i find more information about all this, its all this explained on the Justin's theory book? cause i really want to learn all this stuff, please if someone could help me whit this i would really appreciated.

Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: Mkkl on November 26, 2009, 09:18:54 pm
I must say, the interval ear trainer on www.musictheory.net along with the song references are a very very big help. I learned to hear all the intervals clearly except for one in like three days. Thank you Justin for the references!
Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: JustAlex on January 19, 2010, 08:40:00 am
Here's a great list of intervals and songs (with links!) to remember them by:

http://www.earmaster.com/intervalsongs/
Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: marcusmendonca on March 12, 2010, 03:54:02 am
I can't find the 5 Diminished 5th in the Primus song.  :(
But in the Yngwie Malmsteen song I'll See The Light Tonight there are 5 continuous tritones in the intro guitar riff.
Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: Endureth on June 18, 2010, 01:05:00 am
Doe, a deer, a female deer
Ray, a drop of golden sun
Me, a name I call myself
Far, a long long way to run
Sew, a needle pulling thread
La, a note to follow sew
Tea, I drink with jam and bread
That will bring us back to do...oh oh oh


Is this a scale?

I've recently begun to remember this song from when I was a kid and started thinking about what it was trying to teach me?  Is it simply intervals or is this song trying to teach me how to sing the different notes?

For example, is the first line, 'Doe, a deer, a female deer' illustrating how to sing a particular note?  Like if I hold the note at the end... dooooooooeeeeee.  Am I holding a particular note?

And then the next line, 'Ray, a drop of golden sun' teaching me how to sing a different note, like raaaaaaaayyyyyyyy.

Then if I want to sing the actual note, I just drop the first letter and I know what the note sounds like.  oooooeeeeee and aaaaayyyyy really kind of sound like distinct notes to me, I just don't know what they are.

Or

Am I way off?
Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: close2u on June 18, 2010, 05:40:04 am
this song is built on an octave run of a major scale

try playing an open shape C chord

between your third and first fingers you have an octave

C major scale = C  D  E  F  G  A  B  C

starting with the C note under your 3rd finger, try to play a major scale pattern upto the C note under your 1st finger

Do Re Mi Fa So La Ti Do

do this a few times forwards then backwards

now try to play the melody of the song ... can you find it just by using those 8 notes and your ear?

 :)
Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: SOARINGEAGLE17 on July 03, 2010, 03:10:57 am
I dont understand any of this interval stuff. What does it all mean?ß
Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: close2u on July 03, 2010, 06:42:50 am
you need to know some basic theory before looking at intervals ...

buy this (http://www.justinguitar.com/en/PR-010-RUGS1-PMT.php)
Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: steveo2 on July 03, 2010, 05:08:56 pm
 
 Hi
You need Justins book, there is no perfect 4th there is a perfect 5th
Its a good book, I had other books before which really may contain more info but you will not be able to understand it.
I don't know you but I know I have many books buy any book by Ted Green, but he is from another planet, really a spaceship just pick up his soul.
Great Man , great player but he is a advance teacher teaching advanced players .
I got some really good chord progressions from him.
You have to understand the major scale, interval basic triad so really buy the book, you horse need to be in front of your cart and Justins books will fix that.
With music theory a teacher can use really big words which will make you feel stupid, man just look at modes, sound Greek to me.
You have to start some were and justin book is the start, if there was one book that contain all theory I would want it but it would be the biggest book and you would need six people to open it.
Buy Justins book man if you hate it he will refund you but it well be the best move you made this year.
Steveo



Hi, can anyone tell what does a perfect 4Th means, or a perfect 5Th, please, I'm really confused whit this intervals thing, and also I'm not sure what does a Diminished 5Th Tritone Augmented 4Th, its so frustrating!! I just really hard for me to get it, or maybe someone can tell me where can i find more information about all this, its all this explained on the Justin's theory book? cause i really want to learn all this stuff, please if someone could help me whit this i would really appreciated.


Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: close2u on October 15, 2010, 07:05:16 pm
Here's a great list of intervals and songs (with links!) to remember them by:

http://www.earmaster.com/intervalsongs/

This is a great link ....

I have just been watching Justin's new vids on intervals .. he mentions some songs to help sing / hum / play / hear the intervals.  Here’s a few more simple quick references using the C Major scale to fit in with Justin's key ...

The two notes highlighting the interval are in bold type

Interval - Prime
C to C (the same)
Song – Happy Birthday
“Ha-ppy” (birthday to you)

Interval - Minor 2nd
C to Db
Song – White Christmas
“I’m-drea”   (ming of a white Christmas)

Interval - 2nd
C to D
Song – Happy Birthday
(Ha) “ppy-bir”       (thday to you)


Interval - minor 3rd
C to Eb
Song – Smoke On The Water
“We all”     (came down to Montreux)

[mod edit - due to this thread being discussed much later than it was originally posted, an error has been noted - this example, Smoke on the Water, is not a minor 3rd, it is a major 2nd, (sticking in key) from C to D]
The famous guitar riff moves a minor 3rd from the 1st to the 2nd pairs of notes - but that is a moving 4th dyad / double-stop, not a single-note interval.



Interval - Major 3rd
C to E
Song – Oh When The Saints
“Oh when”    (the saints, go marching in…)

Interval - 4th
C to F
Song – Wedding March
“Here comes”     (the bride…)

Interval - diminished 5th
C to Gb
Song – Maria
“Ma-ri”  (a, I once knew a girl named Maria….)

Interval - 5th
C to G
Song – Moon River
“Moon ri”   (ver, wider than a mile …)

Interval - minor 6th
Song – Love Story
(Where do) … “I be”   (gin)

Interval - Major 6th
Song  -My Bonnie
“My Bon”   (nie lies over the ocean…)

Interval - minor 7th
Song – Star Trek theme
First two notes

Interval - Major 7th
?

Interval - Octave
Song – Somewhere Over The Rainbow
“Some-where”   (over the rainbow)
Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: steveo2 on October 15, 2010, 08:32:49 pm
Doe, a deer, a female deer
Ray, a drop of golden sun
Me, a name I call myself
Far, a long long way to run
Sew, a needle pulling thread
La, a note to follow sew
Tea, I drink with jam and bread
That will bring us back to do...oh oh oh


Is this a scale?

I've recently begun to remember this song from when I was a kid and started thinking about what it was trying to teach me?  Is it simply intervals or is this song trying to teach me how to sing the different notes?

For example, is the first line, 'Doe, a deer, a female deer' illustrating how to sing a particular note?  Like if I hold the note at the end... dooooooooeeeeee.  Am I holding a particular note?

And then the next line, 'Ray, a drop of golden sun' teaching me how to sing a different note, like raaaaaaaayyyyyyyy.

Then if I want to sing the actual note, I just drop the first letter and I know what the note sounds like.  oooooeeeeee and aaaaayyyyy really kind of sound like distinct notes to me, I just don't know what they are.

Or

Am I way off?
You have found the major scale, it is the 1st thing a person should learn in my opion.
Try to find Justin's lesson about the song wonderful tonight.
I kind of like this teacher he did leave out the B miner and the F#minor 7 b 5  and I would just play a D with the F# in the bass, have thumb and it serves me well.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6RmO6fc-FdE
Hope you get this if you do then this song will be a piece of cake
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fp5X4MBIbLs&feature=related
Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: Hakan on December 04, 2010, 12:38:30 am
Hey guys!

I've been studying the interval lessons, but there are some interval references I can't grasp. For instance, a major 3rd is very hard to recognise for me. I did get them right in all 3 tests of the first two stages, but that was only because I eliminated all the other intervals it could have been. I still can't directly recognise or sing the major 3rd on its own.

I understand that many of the interval references are from childrens' songs because they are easy to recall, but I think the problem with me is that I've never sung 'When the Saints go Marching in' when I was a child.

Can anyone suggest more references for the major 3rd (ascending) interval?


Oh! Here's another thing I've discovered; When you add up different intervals you could essentially sing any note on any string when you have an open string as a reference.

So let's say someone tells you to sing a G# on the A string, you'll count the number of semi tones first, which would be 11 in this case
You could go up a 5th(7 semi-tones), and up a major 3rd(4 semi-tones) so it'd be 7+4 = 11 semi-tones up.
Depending on how accurate your voice is you could do it on any string and any number of semi-tones.

This makes me realise that once I've mastered all of the ascending and descending intervals, I could recognise and sing all notes up and down if only I have one single reference note. Wow the thought of being able to fake perfect pitch is exhilarating!
Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: steveo2 on December 06, 2010, 08:45:38 pm
Major 3rd I use mourning has broken and old song I think Cat Steven did it.
The Marines fight song is also a major 3rd.
Mitchell row your boat to shore another.
Kumbaya and Sweet hour of prayer.
You really need a song that will stick with you that's why I say find your own songs..
Justins lessons where good, not real sure why he did them in the order and the trainer at this site is great.
good luck ;D
Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: inthewind on February 14, 2011, 08:48:56 pm
I think I found a song for the Major 7th.  It's Diary by Bread.  I'm quite sure the first two notes of the song are G - F#.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=24IfD-0VUu4

OK, the jokes for knowing this song may begin ......
Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: Bootstrap on February 14, 2011, 09:43:37 pm
I don't hear that on the lyric - I hear prime, prime, descending major 3rd on the words "I found your".

I didn't get my guitar out to try it, but the intro that plays base note/chord could well be G to Gmaj7 (which would contain an F#) - anyone?

In any event - I find the major 7th interval so distinctive (both ascending & descending) that it is one of the easiest intervals to identify, so I've given up looking for a song to match.

Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: TB-AV on February 14, 2011, 10:43:30 pm
e----2------------2-----
B----3------------3-----
G O-----O--O-----------
D-----------------
A--------------
E---------------

Not really an interval but yes G and F# are there.
Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: inthewind on February 15, 2011, 01:19:59 pm
This is def the intro ...

I guess I hear G F# in my head when I hum the intro.


e----2------------2-----
B----3------------3-----
G O-----O--O-----------
D-----------------
A--------------
E---------------

Not really an interval but yes G and F# are there.
Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: JonnyKaine on March 31, 2011, 07:06:09 am
how about the chorus of "take on me" by A-ha for the major 7th: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=djV11Xbc914#t=53s
Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: steveo2 on March 31, 2011, 05:33:58 pm
how about the chorus of "take on me" by A-ha for the major 7th: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=djV11Xbc914#t=53s
Think I will stick with superman.
If I were a teenage girl then yeah the chorus of Aha works.
Faster than a speeding bullet, more powerful when combined with the minor blues scale.
If you add the major 6th is it a bird or a plane .
No it the super duper how do you love voodoo blues.

Playing this may give you super power to do many cool lick, not sure about what licks you can get from A-ha.
None that will rock for sure ;D
Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: Lunchbox on June 19, 2013, 02:46:53 am
Sounds corny (unless you're a drama geek like me), but my wife is a vocal music major, and for learning the major 7th, she suggested the song Maria from West Side Story.  Not the opening, but when he actually sings her name "Mareeee-uh".
Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: Lunchbox on June 19, 2013, 03:18:25 am
Sorry, I messed that up, not Maria, Somewhere from West Side Story.  The chorus.
Title: Re: AU-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: joshs on June 19, 2013, 03:27:56 am
Do you mean the first notes: "There's a" (place for us) as a minor 7th? Maybe there's a major 7th in there somewhere, too? Of course, as I've mentioned before in another thread, I think it's a really bad idea to use these mnemonics anyway. I've found it endlessly frustrating unlearning them.
Title: Re: ET-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: henize on July 28, 2014, 08:03:10 am
For minor 3rd interval, does anyone think that the "so long, farewell" song in the sound of music can be used as song reference as well? :)
Title: Re: ET-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: arunsaha on January 25, 2015, 05:42:57 pm
In the example of desc. min. 7th.  I DID NOT see any minor 7th jump in the 3rd bar of Take the A train. In my opinion this song's example should be removed from the chart. This chart has helped me a lot in other examples so I have a great expectations from it... this incorrect example should not confuse future learners and waste any more time of others! thanks 
Title: Re: ET-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: Meridirh on May 20, 2016, 09:15:21 am
HEy everyone,

I am currently working on Justin's ear training and was wondering, whether or not the list might need some further songs of reference. Especially for those film-maniacs I would recommend some additions to it :)
Justin mentioned there are not many songs for a 6th major. One very famous song is "Leia's Theme" from Star Wars (adding another Star Wars song might be a great addition for those who stdy them anyway).

Cheers,

Lukas
Title: Re: ET-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: nnoone on April 04, 2018, 08:37:52 pm
For the octave and the minor7th major 7th you have the first notes of elegy (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bfhzlG2nFVQ) by the Jesus Lizard.
Title: Re: ET-002 • Song References For Interval Training
Post by: roulbac on April 15, 2019, 02:23:37 pm
Hey,
I’ve been having trouble recognizig descending intervals because i couldn’t find song references until today i realized that a descending fourth sounds like an ascending fifth with the second note at a lower pitch and vice versa.
How do you remember descending intervals?