Author Topic: JA-028 • Tritone Substitution  (Read 4398 times)

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Offline justinguitar

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JA-028 • Tritone Substitution
« on: April 21, 2010, 11:22:08 am »
« Last Edit: May 16, 2011, 05:54:06 pm by justinguitar »
"You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room." Dr. Seuss

Offline ted13

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Re: JA-028 • Tritone Substitution
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2010, 11:13:55 am »
playing a tritone substitution of G7 is basically the same as playing a G7alt since you get all the notes of the G altered scale? so apart from the brain stuff, is it really useful to play tritone substitution rather than just playing G7 altered grips?

Offline justinguitar

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Re: JA-028 • Tritone Substitution
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2010, 04:57:15 pm »
Yes it's the same notes as G7alt, but it can add movement to the bass part - and have you think in a different way.

Sometimes changing the way you think about the notes changes the sound of them. Strange but true.

Plus using "simple" unaltered chords in the "wrong" place changes the effect the sound has on the listener. The right sound in the wrong prace is different to an altered sound. That sounds like jibber=ish, but maybe it will help you get it.

Remember it's about listening - try it, think one way and then think the other... they sound different right!!
"You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room." Dr. Seuss

 

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