Author Topic: Question on Intervals.  (Read 6174 times)

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Offline Harpmaker

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Question on Intervals.
« on: June 28, 2007, 04:30:34 am »
I've made it to page 14 of RUGS and have a burning question that has caused me much consternation while doing the Intervals Worksheet. There are three answers that didn't make sense to me, and I thought I got them wrong, but after thinking about it for a while and after re-reading and re-re-reading the lesson material... I'm still a bit confused!  :lol:

So as not to spoil the lesson for others, I won't mention the specific questions, but only the answers.

The correct interval answers are:
Min 6
Dim 5
Dim 8ve

I had written them as:
Aug 5
Aug 4
Maj 7

After MUCH pondering, I've come to the conclusion that these ARE THE SAME NOTES! They are only called different names; like B# is the same as C.

My question is: why does Justin call them by the "semitone under" name?

If this makes no sense to anyone I'll repost with the worksheet questions to make things clearer and post a spoiler warning.
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Offline TB-AV

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Question on Intervals.
« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2007, 04:56:14 pm »
I think part of the problem is that when you try to determine if the top note is in the scale you have to look closely at it. Is it a # or b.

For instance let's use A to B#. The sharp tell me to count to B   A to B is Major2nd. So B# is Augmented.

Now let's try A to C   Ok, I have to count A B C#    C# is 3rd so C is a minor 3rd

B# and C are the same note.

You Diminished 8ve - I would argue with that answer. It looks like Maj 7th to me too.

The Min6 and Dim5 look right if you count up to or past the actual note. In other words to figure out what the A is you need to count out to A#.

---

My other answer is... I don't have a clue..

TB
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Offline justinguitar

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Question on Intervals.
« Reply #2 on: June 28, 2007, 09:14:11 pm »
well answered TB - it is all in the count...

C to Cb is a diminshed Octave but only in theory - you would hope never to see it :)

Good stuff harps :)

J
"You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room." Dr. Seuss

Offline Harpmaker

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Question on Intervals.
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2007, 06:43:33 am »
Thanks TB!
I get it now!
I used the "effect both" trick (people who wonder what this is - BUY RUGS part 1! :)) to get my answers; it seems one should "convert back" at the end to get the correct interval name.

J., do you still say Dim 8ve is the correct answer, not Maj 7? If so, please explain. Us lowly mortals want to know. :)
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Offline TB-AV

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Question on Intervals.
« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2007, 04:59:07 pm »
Harp, I think it was a bad question.

B# to B because B is naturally occurring as the Major 7th.

So if it were asked as B# to B#b  it would easy to see it as the diminished Octave.

Now look at Justin's answer about C to Cb. Cb is NOT a naturally occurring note in the C scale. So it's easy to see you need to count all the way through teh Octave and then drop back to the diminished.

But on B# to B you can stop at the B. If you stop at the naturally occurring B it's the Major 7th. You would have to be reading the mind of the person asking the question to know their intent of how they wanted to think about that B. did they want you to count all the way to B# and drop back one or stop counting at the Major 7th degree of B.

That's why I said you could argue with Justin's book answer on that one and not be found wrong.

You counted to the first B. Justin counted to the second B which is really a B# flatted to fit his answer.

Actually, I'll step out on a limb here. I think your answer is actually the most correct in the example of B# to B.  Major 7th

I think the example of C to Cb is correct as a Diminished Octave and would have been a better question to show that relationship.

Yep, I see how he got there but I think your answer is better and it's probably what I would have answered as well. Haven't gotten there yet though.



TB
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Offline Harpmaker

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Question on Intervals.
« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2007, 05:27:27 pm »
Thanks TB!

Great explanation, as usual!
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Offline Dimebag

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Question on Intervals.
« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2007, 07:40:22 pm »
Why do I have to know the interval distances of te intervals?
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Offline LievenDV

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Question on Intervals.
« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2007, 08:26:21 am »
another great thread on a great forum!
great info

Offline justinguitar

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Question on Intervals.
« Reply #8 on: August 14, 2007, 07:32:34 am »
Quote from: "Dimebag"
Why do I have to know the interval distances of te intervals?


to help you understand how chords are constructed! and how harmony works...

J
"You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room." Dr. Seuss

Offline wyc9085

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Intervals on the neck
« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2007, 03:55:15 pm »
Hello Justinguitar,

New to forums, but thanks for saving me time and trouble looking for a tutor at least for now.

About the two diagrams on page 22, can you explain with examples the benefits you have listed to the diagrams?  

Are these note relationships only applicable to two isolated strings for the intended purposes?


wyc9085

Offline justinguitar

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Question on Intervals.
« Reply #10 on: October 13, 2007, 10:23:17 am »
Ill do this in a separate post in this forum

http://justinguitar.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=22815#22815

J
"You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room." Dr. Seuss

Offline artonsafari

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Re: Question on Intervals.
« Reply #11 on: September 28, 2011, 07:10:37 pm »
I'm here now and am kind of getting why there can only be one instance of each note name in the key. I've always been messed up with notes and intervals having different names depending on if one's playing with bs or #s.

It's all becoming clear.



I think.  ;D


Edit: I keep getting nailed on E# to F#
That's a sneaky one.
« Last Edit: September 28, 2011, 07:39:50 pm by artonsafari »
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