Author Topic: Variations on Chord Progressions for the Major Scale  (Read 1236 times)

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Offline joerch

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Variations on Chord Progressions for the Major Scale
« on: November 11, 2011, 08:26:27 pm »
Dear all! I have pretty much mastered the major scale and wonder whether anyone has a nice input for a chord-progression variation that contains a tiny first step towards chords that don't belong to the key of G.

Offline mouser9169

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Re: Variations on Chord Progressions for the Major Scale
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2011, 10:16:29 pm »
Key of A: I-IV-V is A-D-E

Key of F: I-vi-ii-V-I is F-Dmin-G-C-F

move those two patterns around so you can play them in all 12 keys.
When you can play all the right notes, at exactly the right times, then you can begin to learn the lick-Jerry Portnoy

We don't want to strum a C chord for the whole 2 bars, because it doesn't have enough color,
and besides it sounds corny-Micky Baker

Offline joerch

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Re: Variations on Chord Progressions for the Major Scale
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2011, 07:13:53 pm »
Key of A: I-IV-V is A-D-E

Key of F: I-vi-ii-V-I is F-Dmin-G-C-F

move those two patterns around so you can play them in all 12 keys.

Thanks for your reply. Yet, I feel it's not quite what I was looking for. In order to train my ear and feel for the scales and the respective keys a little, I was looking for a chord or two that you could throw in into a key of G progression. Let's say you have a progression like this I, VIminor, V, IV (G, Em, D, C). I am now looking for a fine one or two chord cadence, that makes me leave the key of G for two measures and then come back again.

Offline shadowscott007

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Re: Variations on Chord Progressions for the Major Scale
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2011, 07:32:51 pm »
Write out the notes for any key in which you desire to play.

The first note is always the root of a Major chord.
The second a Minor chord
The third a Minor chord
The fourth a Major chord
The fifth a Major chord
The sixth a Minor chord
The seventh a half diminished chord...

Every key the same pattern. If you want the seventh chords:
First and fourth are Major seventh chords
Second third and sixth are minor seventh chords
The fifth is the seventh chord (dominant 7)
The seventh is the minor 7 flat 5 chord
The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.