Author Topic: CS-001 • Crossroads - Eric Clapton  (Read 8045 times)

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Offline justinguitar

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CS-001 • Crossroads - Eric Clapton
« on: October 21, 2011, 02:41:24 pm »
« Last Edit: January 25, 2012, 12:32:12 am by Indigo »
"You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room." Dr. Seuss

Offline Wink

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Re: CS-001 • Crossroads - Eric Clapton
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2011, 05:13:06 pm »
Hey Justin,
You asked the rhetorical question, "was this too fast". The answer for me was fast, yes, too fast no. I'm attacking it in segments and transcribing as I go. I've finished with the first 12 bars and am half way through the second. Transcription in the second 12 is a little more difficult, you are moving a little faster and the phrasing is more complex. So, its more challenging but it should be. I admit to capturing the audio and using it in Capo to slow you down a bit and work out the timing more than the notes you are playing. For me getting the timing right is the big issue and writing that correctly is the challenge. Anyway, thanks for the lesson, its great, and it dovetails with the intro lesson you did earlier. Don.

Offline Vykintas

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Re: CS-001 • Crossroads - Eric Clapton
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2011, 09:37:23 pm »
Hello,

I have a question:
now me and some friends of mine are playing this tune and now i kinda faced myself a dillema, what should i do, should i transcribe the whole original solos and play them, or maybe it would be better to write my own solos for this song (i can easily do it)? which way would be the better thing to do in terms of becoming a better player?

Offline shadowscott007

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Re: CS-001 • Crossroads - Eric Clapton
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2011, 12:52:04 am »
Both.  Nail the solo to learn what you can from it.  Then start improvising over it yourself.

Shadow
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Offline artonsafari

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Re: CS-001 • Crossroads - Eric Clapton
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2011, 10:39:36 pm »
Lot of really nice licks and pieces of licks in there.
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Offline steveo2

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Re: CS-001 • Crossroads - Eric Clapton
« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2012, 08:45:34 pm »
Did not watch the whole lesson, but thought it was good and the pace was good.
Too be honest you could speed things along, this is close to advanced stuff here so the pace should advance as well.
I have but 2 thumb up if I had 3 this would get 3.


This was a good solo to learn some the the major and minor scales combined.
If you said the below stuff in the lesson it may help

The basic theory is too play major on the 1 or one chord, so A major then play A minor on the 4 or fourth chord back to major on the one.
The 5th or five chord play the major of that chord in this the E chord

Offline brynwashere

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Re: CS-001 • Crossroads - Eric Clapton
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2014, 08:51:53 pm »
Hi Justin,

I am a relative newbie guitarist and I'm really struggling with the relationship between scales and chords.  I have read through a few music theory booklets and I understand I IV V sequence.

In this video, from 3:00 to 5:10, you play 4 licks in A major pentatonic and A minor pentatonic.  As you are playing over the chord of A, that is understandable.

However, after 5:10, you say that the band have moved into chord D, yet you play lick 5 in A minor pentatonic, and even mention at ~5:33 that we go to the root note (A).  How does that work if the chord is D?  I am sure there must be some logic there somewhere, but I am not seeing it.

Please answer.  Very confused  :o  :'(

Offline shadowscott007

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Re: CS-001 • Crossroads - Eric Clapton
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2014, 09:11:32 pm »
In general for rock and roll, you can get away with picking a scale to play over the entire chord progession.

In this case the song is "in A" and largely a blues based tune so you can get away with playing over the entire progression with the A major/minor pentatonic scales.

Shadow
The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

Offline brynwashere

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Re: CS-001 • Crossroads - Eric Clapton
« Reply #8 on: February 15, 2014, 10:13:36 pm »
In general for rock and roll, you can get away with picking a scale to play over the entire chord progession.

In this case the song is "in A" and largely a blues based tune so you can get away with playing over the entire progression with the A major/minor pentatonic scales.

Shadow

Thanks for the reply.
So normally would you have to switch to the scale to match the chord?

Offline shadowscott007

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Re: CS-001 • Crossroads - Eric Clapton
« Reply #9 on: February 15, 2014, 11:43:29 pm »
You CAN switch the scale for a chord but you typically do not HAVE to...

As a beginner using a scale (usually the pentatonics) over the changes is the best way to get your feet wet soloing.  Then learning arpeggios to cover odd chords that show up in some progressions.

There are exceptions of course, and the better you get the more optionc open up for you.

In Jazz you typically are following the chords with the solo and may in fact be changing scales over each chord change.

Sometimes there is just a chord outta nowhere that is completely out of key and you have to chnge the scale or use an arpeggio to cover it.

Finally like the solo in question you can pop back and forth between some scales IF YOU WANT TO, in this case Aminor and Amajor pentatonic.  You could do the solo in either one of the whole way through...

Bottom line its art, if it sounds good it is good, and the "rules" are just there to help get a handle on what tends to work so you can eventually break the very rules that helped you get good enough to break the rules.

Shadow
The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.