Author Topic: Stage 4 songs.  (Read 5185 times)

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Offline dougster

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Re: Stage 4 songs.
« Reply #15 on: January 10, 2012, 06:59:39 am »
Killing Me Softly, Strumming Pattern ideas?

Any suggestions? Justin recommends the old faithful pattern of [D /D U/ U/D}, but that pattern seems maybe too... kinetic... with this song. Especially when playing along with the gentle Roberta Flack version at a ~110 tempo and having a singer accompany me.  I am trying a [D / U/ /D] pattern, but I'm not sure. Has anyone else tried some alternative strumming patterns with this?

Thanks :-)
« Last Edit: January 10, 2012, 12:17:29 pm by close2u »

Offline jacksroadhouse

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Re: Stage 4 songs.
« Reply #16 on: January 10, 2012, 08:14:32 am »
If you want to play the song in the style of Roberta Flack, you will probably need to fingerpick it. You could use a simple arpeggeiation, a pattern like R 32 123 or R 23 132 (R=Root, numbers=strings).

Other than that, the key with a song like that imho is not so much the pattern, but the strumming itself. You'd need to strum this very softly. You could try to strum D _uD _ (full measure, counted 1 _+3 _), that should work with the rhythm. I could imagine some other patterns for this, but that would mean 16th note strumming.

Offline dougster

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Re: Stage 4 songs.
« Reply #17 on: January 12, 2012, 07:06:05 pm »
I like the idea of fingerpicking Killing Me Softly, thanks! Once I get more practice with that technique, this'll be a good one to try.
I tried recording myself playing along with the song in garageband, and am realizing that it sounds more relaxed in the recording, even though I felt like I was going bananas playing it at speed. Though it also highlighted where I was falling off tempo and missing changes. Pretty cool overall.

Offline jaytorch22

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Re: Stage 4 songs.
« Reply #18 on: June 20, 2012, 08:56:32 pm »
I apologize if this question was asked already but I didn't see it.  I'm having some trouble with the "pushed" chord change for "Sitting on the Dock..."  I understand that there's a 2-bar pattern but the strumming pattern in the book looks like the chord change is in the middle of the 2-bar pattern.  So when there's a chord change, do you just play each chord for one bar? 

Thanks for your help.
Jay

Offline jacksroadhouse

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Re: Stage 4 songs.
« Reply #19 on: June 20, 2012, 09:52:04 pm »
I don't have the book, so I'm not sure what Justin wrote there. But...

Typically pushes mean that you anticipate the chord change, in a 8th note strumming/rhythm usually by one 8th. What that means is that you change the chord not on the "1", but on the "4-and" (the last 8th in the measure. With the "D du udu" strum pattern you'd change the chord on the last up-stroke, so the last up is already the new chord:

Code: [Select]
G      B7      C       A
D du uduD du uduD du uduD du udu
1 2& &4&1 2& &4&1 2& &4&1 2& &4&

For this to work you have to do the chord changes very fast. If that's too much right now, I wouldn't sweat it. The song sounds just fine without the pushes.

EDIT: unless you're talking abput the bridge here, that's a different story altogether.

Offline OzzieDave

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« Reply #20 on: May 25, 2013, 12:48:26 am »
Q1 I am right in thinking verse 1, line 1, is 2 bars of C then 2 beats each of G and Fmaj7 then 1 bar of C ?
This would be a total of 16 beats per line for the verses (and waaaay to fast for me)

Q2 If I am right with the verse then does this mean the chorus is the same ? making chorus line 2 and 3 as written really just 1 line (Am,Fmaj7,G,G) so the chorus would be 4 lines of 4 bars.

If all that is correct I am sure I will work out the Bridge just by listening a few more times :D

I have found with other songs that getting bar patterns set in my head makes it easier to start remembering chord patterns which then makes for better changes and will hopefully get me going fast enough for this song :)
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Offline OzzieDave

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« Reply #21 on: May 25, 2013, 01:13:48 am »
Confused with how many bars per line
Is it Am,Fmaj7,C,G for the first line,   Am,Fmaj7 second line  and  C,G for the third line or 2 bars per line ?

And is the chorus 1 or 2 bars per line  ???
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Offline sophiehiker

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Re: Stage 4 songs.
« Reply #22 on: May 25, 2013, 01:03:36 pm »
Haven't played it in a while, but my notes say:

One bar each chord all the way through.  One bar Am, one bar F, one bar C, and one bar G.  The F is a partial F barre with the low E and high e strings muted.  The bridge is all down strums, no hammer downs.
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