Author Topic: RH-023 • Funk Grooves  (Read 14236 times)

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Offline justinguitar

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RH-023 • Funk Grooves
« on: November 25, 2008, 03:03:26 pm »
« Last Edit: January 24, 2012, 11:33:14 pm by Indigo »
"You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room." Dr. Seuss

Offline Thera

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Re: RH-023 • Funk Grooves
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2009, 04:03:25 pm »
What scale types would you use to solo over the funk backing? For example when your use the e (9, 7 , 13, etc) cords.

thanks
Thera
Thera

Offline xXForget itXx

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Re: RH-023 • Funk Grooves
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2009, 03:48:11 pm »
Almost all the notes in those chords fit in E major, so I think you'd be fine soloing off with an E major scale ;)

BTW, can't wait for the next lessons :D
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Offline Thera

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Re: RH-023 • Funk Grooves
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2009, 03:33:03 pm »
does anyone know any other scale types to use besides major scales though because you dont really solo using major scales.
Thera

Offline Adlai

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Re: RH-023 • Funk Grooves
« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2009, 03:03:06 am »
Using the major scales could sound naff, as Justin says it. You can see why if you break down the funk chords.

The 7th chords Justin showed us contain either:
  • root, third, dominant seventh, octave
  • or root, fifth, dominant seventh, "tenth" (third up an octave)

The 9th chords Justin showed us contain either:
  • root, third, dominant seventh, ninth
  • or root, third, dominant seventh, ninth, "twelfth" (fifth up an octave)

The 13th chord Justin showed us contains the root, third, dominant seventh, ninth, and thirteenth.

The 11th/sus4 chord Justin showed us contains the root, fifth, dominant seventh, and eleventh.

Now, we want a scale which we can play over all these chords without running into "problem notes", notes that cause a great deal of tension, and sound bad in most situations. In other words, we want a scale where every note sounds pretty correct. Some notes might cause a slight tension, and work better as passing tones, but they won't clash as strongly.

Right away, we have to rule out the major scale, because of its Major Seventh. The chords we've looked at all contain the dominant seventh, which is a half tone flatter than the Major Seventh. Thus, playing a major scale over these funk chords could result in that unpleasant clash of two neighboring notes.

However, this problem can be corrected. There is another scale obtained by flattening the 7th of the major scale. This scale is known as the Mixolydian scale, or the Mixolydian mode (I won't go into modal derivation here, just know that if somebody says Mixolydian mode, it's this scale). The scale looks like this:
1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7b - octave.

We have all the notes from the funk chords in this scale:
1 (root) 2 (ninth) 3 (third) 4 (eleventh) 5 (fifth) 6 (thirteenth) 7b (dominant seventh) octave (root)

Some examples of the Mixolydian mode:
   Scale       1  2  3  4  5  6  7b 1
A Mixolydian:  A  B  C# D  E  F# G  A
D Mixolydian:  D  E  F# G  A  B  C  D
G Mixolydian:  G  A  B  C  D  E  F  G
C Mixolydian:  C  D  E  F  G  A  Bb C
F Mixolydian:  F  G  A  Bb C  D  Eb F
Bb Mixolydian: Bb C  D  Eb F  G  Ab Bb



Now, when you solo over a progression involving these funk chords, experiment with emphasizing the scale tones special to that chord, when you play the scale. Thus...
For the ninth, emphasize the ninth.
For the 13th, emphasize the ninth and the sixth.
For the 11th, emphasize the fourth.

The seventh chord is more of a "blank" -- the shell, without an extended tone (9th, etc). Thus, you don't need to feel obliged to emphasize the 7b when the rhythm player gets to the seventh chords.

I'm not going to bother adding a fingering chart, because it's very easy to figure out the mixolydian scale on your own. Take any major scale fingering, and drop the seventh (the note immediately before the root, and lower in pitch) one fret towards the nut. If moving to that fret is too big a stretch, play the same note, on a thicker string.

Have fun!
« Last Edit: January 07, 2009, 08:08:53 pm by Adlai »
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Offline Adlai

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Re: RH-023 • Funk Grooves
« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2009, 08:10:58 pm »
hehe  :D

Well, again, the major scale is fine, except for that one note. You just have to be careful how you use it.
"All music is folk music; I ain't never heard no horse sing a song." -- Louis Armstrong

Offline sn0wster

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Re: RH-023 • Funk Grooves
« Reply #6 on: August 09, 2009, 10:25:17 am »
Hi Justin - a couple of funky questions for you..

What pick gauge do you prefer for funk strumming - heavy or light?
Do you like to have your pickups volume set to high or low?
Do you have a preferred pickup position for funk tone - neck or bridge?

Thanks,

Offline justinguitar

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Re: RH-023 • Funk Grooves
« Reply #7 on: November 30, 2009, 11:45:11 pm »
Well answered @Adlai

@sn0wster

I use a think pick on electric (Jazz III)

Pickup volume up full and then backed off just a little.

Out of phase is good for funk (strat positions 2 and 4), both both neck and bridge sound cool too - just depends on the situation.

J
"You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room." Dr. Seuss

Offline sophiehiker

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Re: RH-023 • Funk Grooves
« Reply #8 on: March 31, 2010, 03:06:29 pm »

Here's a similar lesson from another teacher.  Sometimes it helps to have another perspective.  I don't know how long it will remain posted...

http://www.guitarworld.com/article/ross_bolton_guitar_101_column_feelin039_the_funk_may_2010

Cheers...
...where the deer and the antelope play.  Well, they're not really playing.  They're fleeing in terror.

Offline cobaltblue

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Re: RH-023 • Funk Grooves
« Reply #9 on: June 08, 2011, 06:49:18 am »
Sorry if my question was tackled already but I just want to know if I can use the Major Pentatonic Scale for soloing on funk chords? for 7th, 13th and 9th chords.  ???


Oh, and btw, what pickups should I use? The Neck or the Bridge?
« Last Edit: August 09, 2012, 07:43:21 am by close2u »